• Sign in to Neowin Faster!

    Create an account on Neowin to contribute and support the site.

Sign in to follow this  

NTFS or FAT32?

Recommended Posts

baphomet_irl    0

I would like to know what ppl think is the best or fastest file format - and which they use.

Is it true that FAT32 is slightly faster?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mortensen    0

I use NTFS. "I" find it runs faster and makes Win2k and XP a lot more stable. It also has a lot better security than FAT32.

-mortensenj

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
configure    1

NTFS is the encrypted fs, unlike FAT32, which is not. I'm not sure about this but, I was told that NTFS can't be manage using fdisk? Is that true?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Toxicfume    7

NTFS is faster and i have heard it performs a little better in benchmarks.

Apart from that NTFS can encrypt and compress files :china: ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
xibit    0

Hi...

If I want to convert my system disk from fat32 - ntfs without loosing any data can i do this from command prompt: convert c: /fs:ntfs ?? :s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
doom    0

i like ntfs way better than fat32

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Steven P.    13,804
Originally posted by xibit  

Hi...

If I want to convert my system disk from fat32 - ntfs without loosing any data can i do this from command prompt: convert c: /fs:ntfs   ??  :s

Yes you can, but do not interrupt the conversion! that will result in data loss, sometimes it takes a long time to do (depending on the size of the partition and data on it)

Remember also that you will not be able to boot up to dos disk and see your file system afterwards.

I only ever use a dosdisk for PM and Bios updates, which work fine with a NTFS partition. (Bios does not need file system to flash)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aco    0

Open up a command prompt and type the following..

convert driveletter: /fs:ntfs

Please remember that you'll need a certain amount of free space on the volume to convert it. (A place for the clusters to be stored while they a being reorganised)

Also remember that you cannot reverse the process.

If you are trying to convert the system partition it will not work without rebooting. The conversion will happen during the reboot.

NOT SURE ABOUT BELOW:

clustersize, I think it is set to 512byte with ntfs. You can set it to what you like with this:

convert drive: /fs:ntfs /a:clustersize

...a bit :s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
me101    0

NTFS is better, has better management of small files due to it's actual structure, and has loads of advantages over FAT32 that are way too numerous to mention. And I have always found it to be more reliable than FAT32.

If you desire to read NTFS from Win98 etc, all is not lost, there is actually a neat util, from those oh so clever guys over at sysinternals.com

NTFS for Windows 98 is a NTFS file system driver for Windows 95 and Windows 98. Once installed, any NTFS drives present on your system will be fully accessible as native Windows 98 volumes. This free version provides read-only capabilities. A read/write version is for sale at Winternals Software. To access NTFS drives from DOS for read/write access, see NTFSDOS Professional.

And if you have a linux varient, there is even a ntfs read only mountable extension that allows you to have the same access as above, only now in linux, neat :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
baphomet_irl    0

thx for all the info guys

:p

eheh

me101 - u couldnt list off some of the other advantages for me, could u?

would formatting my XP partition to NTFS botch up my FAT32 partition (where I have 98SE)?

And does the system crash less using NTFS?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+Tikimotel    23

xp doesn't automatically reboot after scandisk has been completed :(

restart function in windows itself does work however and so does shutdown, what wrong? (bug)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
baphomet_irl    0

toxicfume - when u say that NTFS can encrypt - do u mean that it auto-compresses like 'Drivespace' did? - because that was horrible :/

or do u mean that u can choose to have certain folders encrypted and locked - and if so - what size is the compression like relative to say .rar or .zip?

soz about all the questions - it's just im considering converting to NTFS - but I jus wanna b sure

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Baigley    2

Hey guys...

I agree that NTFS is better than Fat32..

But is there a way to view NTFS in DOS?

Im running Fat32 right now w/ XP 2600.. (Final)

And was wondering if there is any way at all to

view my files on NTFS from DOS... Thanx alot

-=- SCUBA -=-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DWZ    0
Originally posted by scuba  

And was wondering if there is any way at all to  

view my files on NTFS from DOS...  

You need to make XP boot disks. In Win 2000 Pro there was a program on the CD which did it for you, but I don?t know how to do it in XP...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mortensen    0

I don't know any way of accessing NTFS partitions from DOS [though I've heard if can be done]. FDisk can be used for REMOVE NTFS [by deleting the partition] and recognises NTFS without problem.

-mortensenj

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jon    5

Keep in mind, if you do convert to NTFS, you then have the extra chore of managing access rights , permisions etc.

Can be great for locking down a system, but can also be a pain in the arse.

NTFS is faster, especially if you run the indexing service, which will keep an up to date list of regestered file types, for quick searches etc. Whether you will ever go start>search> *.doc etc I dont know.

NTFS also has better recovery options, a more thorough chkdsk implementation.

EFS needs NTFS, but why would you really need to use EFS on a home pc? (If your computer is stolen, its quite easy to obtain the adminsitrators recovery key, and access the data, thats nothing new).

Personally, I run NTFS, at work, and at home.

If you use any combination of Windows 2000 , NT or XP , use NTFS.

Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
me101    0

Ok, this is off the top of my head, so some details may be flakey... :)

Each user has a seperate recycle bin under NTFS unlike fat partitions where a single recycye bin is active, regardless of the current logon account.

NTFS offers, file/directory/share level permissions controls, you can make it so that only certain users or groups of users see or act on specific files or folders or shares.

Better integrity checking for status of faulty drives, with the ability to "hot fix" any storage devices. I also think there is a log taken of all activity to the file system so that changes may be undone or reapplied if a problem is found, like a system failure or power outage causes damage.

Compression to a specific dir can be done automatically, and encrpytion of the same criteria, it's even recommended in a secure environment to use efs on the windows temp dir!

Disk quotas can be utilised, using third party tools (not sure if XP has some rudementary controls thou... not at an XP box at the mo...)

NTFS is a "proper" file system with some advanced controls, links can be created, both hard and soft much like linux based file systems, this is really a neat feature, which I use on a daily basis.

NTFS also has streams, a really neat concept, allowing one file to have many sub parts.

The cluster size in NT can be very useful, as the file system can actually store small files, inside the cluster that contains the actual file directory information, thus saving on valuable drive space! Believe me this has it's advantages when you have loads of files in one dir, all small!

NTFS can support really really large drives...think it's up to 2tb but I could be wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jon    5

If you're usign EFS on the windows temp area, you better be dam sure the application writing the temp file can actually handly efs files, some older apps will read it as jargon.

As for disk quotas, Windows 2000 has a basic quota system, so XP will. Its very basic, and certainly not scalable to a large business's needs. (OT, but same goes for win2k's remote storage (HSM) app, its great for one fileserver, crap if u have any more than that)

Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
baphomet_irl    0

thx man

:D

I spose I should really go and read a FAQ somewhere, cos it is obviously a VERY detailed subject....

jus two quik questions thou.. (soz)

does the efs/compression thing slow down disk access?

and in continuation from that question - does all of this service and indexing stuff in NTFS not make it slower than FAT32?

as usual any help would be much appreciated

:bandit:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jon    5

You shouldnt need EFS.

It only encrypts files on the local system, it will decrypt them when u send them over the net etc. And yeah, I should imagine it grabs a fair few cpu cycles too (not tried to that extent though).

Indexing Service, hm, well i've not noticed a big slow down, but i've also not noticed any benifits, I dont often search for docs or whatever. (It is disabled by default).

Personally I recommend you go with a default NTFS, and maybe look into securing your file system with permisions a little.

I would ignore EFS,compression and indexing to be honest.

Hope that helps!

Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
me101    0

I would go with the recommendations that Jon has mentioned, and can agree, that the I've not really seen a big increase in performance with it, although I've not got that many documents for it to be a great benefit.

As to compression, it's actually not bad, don't seen to see any lag on my old system when using it, but then again, with hard disks at an all time low, storage has never been this cost effective.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dslava    0

i've used "convert" command to convert old FAT32 to NTFS partition. now, when i check NTFS version (i use Partition magic 7 for this), program say, that i have "NTFS version 3.1", but i've heard that WinXP use 5.1 version. i think that this is a PM7 bug, but how can i be sure about NTFS version i have?

thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tesseract    0

NTFS 1.0 was used in Windows NT 3.1, NTFS 2.0 was used in

NT 4, NTFS 3.0 was used in Win 2000 (NT 5), and thus NTFS 3.1 is used in Win XP (NT 5.1).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dslava    0

2 codyg11

thank you very much

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
baphomet_irl    0

another question eheh

I triboot 98SE/2000/XP 2600

If i convert 2000 and XP to NTFS, would I be able to save something in the 98 partition (even thou it's FAT32)?

And in the event of the two NT os's dying (i konw its unlikey) - how would I retrieve my data?

thx again for any help

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.