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Thoughts on the Canon PowerShot SX60 HS as a first camera?

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compl3x    6,290

What do people think of this as a first camera for someone? Also, I am wondering how this camera holds up against the Nikon Coolpix P900?

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Draconian Guppy    13,037

at $500ish  (i Found one at $450) MSRP I find it a bit steep, since entry level dSLRS can be had for that amount.  

 

According to spec reviewer snapsort

 

http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon-PowerShot-SX60-HS-vs-Nikon-Coolpix-P900

 

 

IMO, both way too pricey for what they offer and a dSLR will offer more value in the long run. I too was at this same point years ago, considering spending a whole lot on a bridge camera (eg, decent built in lens, not point and shoot, not dSLR ), after much research, went dSLR.

 

 

Edit: examples for canon and nikon, from a quick amazon search:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Nikon-Digital-Focus-S-18-55mm-3-5-5-6G/dp/B00HQ4W1QE/ref=sr_1_3?s=photo&ie=UTF8&qid=1481724505&sr=1-3&keywords=nikon+d3300

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Canon-Rebel-Digital-18-55mm-Lens/dp/B00BW6LY2Y/ref=sr_1_5?s=photo&ie=UTF8&qid=1481724532&sr=1-5&keywords=canon+entry+level+dslr

 

 

 

Couple of questions to better answer

 

What is your budget?

What are you main interests in photography? Eg. landscape, portrait, street, etc

Any specific requirement? eg. weather sealing, portability (size)

 

 

 

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Skiver    1,947

Pretty much nailed it above, the only thing I would add is to actually try them out in a shop in terms of holding them, the difference in weight, balance etc can make a big difference between cameras.

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Draconian Guppy    13,037
2 minutes ago, Skiver said:

Pretty much nailed it above, the only thing I would add is to actually try them out in a shop in terms of holding them, the difference in weight, balance etc can make a big difference between cameras.

Ahhh pretty good advice I left out, ergonomics and feel!

 

Quick tid bit on this.   my SO, loves to takes photos, but complains that my old nikon d5000 which I passed down to her, is too big and heavy for her to carry around and because of that, relies mostly on her smartphone for photos.

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compl3x    6,290
1 hour ago, Draconian Guppy said:

 

 

Couple of questions to better answer

 

What is your budget?

What are you main interests in photography? Eg. landscape, portrait, street, etc

Any specific requirement? eg. weather sealing, portability (size)

 

 

 

 

Hi Guppy. Thanks for the reply.

 

I am thinking about $600AUD as a budget. I came across this Nikon D3400 camera which seems to have pretty good reviews as an entry-level dSLR.

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Draconian Guppy    13,037
15 minutes ago, compl3x said:

 

Hi Guppy. Thanks for the reply.

 

I am thinking about $600AUD as a budget. I came across this Nikon D3400 camera which seems to have pretty good reviews as an entry-level dSLR.

compared to a same price canon in that web page:  (well $100aud difference)

 

http://thenewcamera.com/nikon-d3400-vs-canon-1300d-2/

 

 

 

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Skiver    1,947

Looks to be a pretty decent camera however I would refer back to one of Guppys comments above - Why do you want to spend $600 AUD on a camera? 

 

If you think spending more money has a direct correlation in getting those amazing shots you'll waste your money. That with a stock 18-55mm style lens will not give you much above a $200 camera if you leave them both in auto mode. 

 

I'm no pro, but to get the most out of my D5100 I know it takes time and patience when you don't understand the direct correlation on things like Exposure and shutter speed and you'll probably need to throw a bit of tweaking in photo editing suites too rather than relying on default post processing of a camera.

 

I also learnt pretty quickly that in order to get THAT shot I wanted I needed to buy something else so be prepared to spend more if you're going to get properly into it. Want to take one of those amazing light trail shots, you'll need a tripod, want to take an awesome long exposure of the milkyway? Yeah you'll probably want a remote, wildlife? Probably going to need a zoom lens. Architecture, probably a wide angle.... the list goes on!

 

I'm not trying to put you off or anything, but I've been frustrated before by people who see a fairly expensive camera and automatically assume that any good shot I produce is because of that camera and not because of the time I took to capture it and the work that went in afterwards on the processing.

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Draconian Guppy    13,037
3 minutes ago, Skiver said:

Looks to be a pretty decent camera however I would refer back to one of Guppys comments above - Why do you want to spend $600 AUD on a camera? 

 

1.If you think spending more money has a direct correlation in getting those amazing shots you'll waste your money. That with a stock 18-55mm style lens will not give you much above a $200 camera if you leave them both in auto mode. 

 

I'm no pro, but to get the most out of my D5100 I know it takes time and patience when you don't understand the direct correlation on things like Exposure and shutter speed and you'll probably need to throw a bit of tweaking in photo editing suites too rather than relying on default post processing of a camera.

 

I also learnt pretty quickly that in order to get THAT shot I wanted I needed to buy something else so be prepared to spend more if you're going to get properly into it. Want to take one of those amazing light trail shots, you'll need a tripod, want to take an awesome long exposure of the milkyway? Yeah you'll probably want a remote, wildlife? Probably going to need a zoom lens. Architecture, probably a wide angle.... the list goes on!

 

I'm not trying to put you off or anything, but I've been frustrated before by people who see a fairly expensive camera and automatically assume that any good shot I produce is because of that camera and not because of the time I took to capture it and the work that went in afterwards on the processing.

Agreed, perhaps if the op stated was his photograhic intentions are, a better recommendation on Body/lens can be made perhaps a 18-200mm would be a decent alround.

AND      being prepared for the learning curve to get OFF auto is the best advice.

 

I actually have 3 exact same scenarios from people close to me, who got an entry level dSLR and while their photography is pretty bad, IT  has made them slightly better than a point and shoot, just because of that learning curve.

 

 

 

 

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Skiver    1,947
1 minute ago, Draconian Guppy said:

Agreed, perhaps if the op stated was his photograhic intentions are, a better recommendation on Body/lens can be made perhaps a 18-200mm would be a decent alround.

AND      being prepared for the learning curve to get OFF auto is the best advice.

 

I actually have 3 exact same scenarios from people close to me, who got an entry level dSLR and while their photography is pretty bad, IT  has made them slightly better than a point and shoot, just because of that learning curve.

 

 

 

 

 

Without meaning to go too off topic, a friend got me into it. So from the start I had an idea as I got to play around with his camera.

 

As I was deciding what to buy I signed up to a photography forum and read and I read all the topics, they had some pretty good starter guides around the depth of field, rule of three's etc. So when I finally got my dSLR I set my camera to manual and tried to never use any of the auto modes. The misses hated me for it because I'd be taking 5 pictures of one thing, making small adjustments each time to work out what was the best setting but when I was using it I felt I was getting OK at it. 

 

My problem now is motivation, it's been so long that the last time I got my camera out I felt completely out of it and had to settle for one of the auto settings to get me through :(

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Draconian Guppy    13,037
2 minutes ago, Skiver said:

Without meaning to go too off topic, a friend got me into it. So from the start I had an idea as I got to play around with his camera.

 

As I was deciding what to buy I signed up to a photography forum and read and I read all the topics, they had some pretty good starter guides around the depth of field, rule of three's etc. So when I finally got my dSLR I set my camera to manual and tried to never use any of the auto modes. The misses hated me for it because I'd be taking 5 pictures of one thing, making small adjustments each time to work out what was the best setting but when I was using it I felt I was getting OK at it. 

 

My problem now is motivation, it's been so long that the last time I got my camera out I felt completely out of it and had to settle for one of the auto settings to get me through :(

This is actually good advice

 

@compl3x do you have a friend who could let you fiddle/take photos with his/her dSLR?

 

 

also on the 5 photo bits, I take over 20 :laugh: the more you know, the more you fiddle if you ask me.

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