Coal Fire, Not Just Iceberg, Doomed the Titanic, a Journalist Claims


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Coal Fire, Not Just Iceberg, Doomed the Titanic, a Journalist Claims

 

04Titanic-master768.jpg

The Titanic leaving Southampton, England, on its ill-fated voyage on April 10, 1912.

 

LONDON — Maybe it wasn’t just the iceberg.

 

Ever since the Titanic sank more than 104 years ago, killing more than 1,500 men, women and children, mystery has swirled around the tragedy.

 

No one doubts that the ship collided at high speed with an iceberg off the coast of Newfoundland.

 

But a new documentary posits that the sinking of the ship — hailed at the time as the largest ever built, and praised for its professed unsinkability — may have been accelerated by a giant coal fire in its hull that appeared to have started as long as three weeks before it set off on its fateful journey to New York from Southampton, England.

 

In the documentary, which was broadcast on Channel 4 in Britain on New Year’s Day, Senan Molony, an Irish journalist who has spent more than 30 years researching the Titanic, contends that the fire, in a three-story-high bunker next to one of the ship’s boiler rooms, damaged its hull, helping to seal its fate long before it slammed into the iceberg.

 

“It’s a perfect storm of extraordinary factors coming together: fire, ice and criminal negligence,” he argues in the documentary, “Titanic: The New Evidence.” “The fire was known about, but it was played down. She should never have been put to sea.”

 

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Hum

I'm so glad I missed the boat

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Rigby

Nonsense, it was sunk by aliens. The ship was getting to close to their secret undersea base.

 

(That's how this section of the forum works, right?)

Edited by Rigby
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Jim K

hmmm...wonder if this Journalist/expert took notes from the GSA, particularly Mr. Essenhigh who presented his own evidence for this (in 2004) ...

 

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The Titanic sank as the result of hitting an iceberg when steaming at full speed in the middle of the night through an iceberg field, in spite of radio warnings. Unanswered is: Why was the ship at full speed under those conditions? It was not trying to set a cross-Atlantic speed record.; the ship was designed for luxury, not speed. The answer may be a smoldering fire in coal bunker # 6. Spontaneous ignition of coal in seams, culm banks, and bunkers is well-known with a long history. At the time of the Titanic sailing, it was known as a chronic, but not an acute problem. The most effective containment solution involved sailing at full speed to drawdown the coal in the bunker until the smoldering coal could be extracted and fed into the boiler. This may be why the Titanic proceeded at full throttle through the ice field. Bunker fires being a chronic problem, fire control teams were common in port and on many ships, including the Titanic. The Titanic fire was under attention by Port fire control teams at Southampton before sailing, and at the stop in Cherbourg, with continuing control actions during the voyage; but full speed steaming was evidently not sufficient for adequate draw-down in the ship. Using data supplied by Harland and Wolf, the builders in Belfast, the bunker was evidently only partly filled with about 800 tons of coal and with the fire probably in the top half of the bunker. From this capacity, the maximum rate of drawdown is estimated to have been ~2 in. per hour, in agreement with an estimate from firing densities and grate areas, boiler thermal efficiencies, and engine HP. By comparison, minimum rates of upward flame spread at �-in/hr for small particles were measured in laboratory experiments at Sheffield University in the 1950�s which extrapolate to � to 1 in/hour for particles of the size onboard the Titanic. At full speed, the bunker fire would have had a net drawdown rate of the order of 1-in/hr. At this rate, a fire that originated in the top half of the bunker would still have been in the bunker at the time of collision. Two dimensional computer models for the initiation of fires in coal piles are used show a possible behavior pattern relevant to the Titanic bunker fire.

 

Titanic: "The New Evidence" ... hardly.

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Pishaw
30 minutes ago, jjkusaf said:

The Titanic sank as the result of hitting an iceberg when steaming at full speed in the middle of the night through an iceberg field, in spite of radio warnings. Unanswered is: Why was the ship at full speed under those conditions? It was not trying to set a cross-Atlantic speed record.; the ship was designed for luxury, not speed.

Luxury AND speed. The ship was designed to travel as fast or faster than other ships of the type. It hit an iceberg. It sank.

 

The End.

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Buttus
1 hour ago, Rigby said:

Nonsense, it was sunk by aliens. The ship was getting to close to their secret undersea base.

 

(That's how this section of the forum works, right?)

the aliens set the fire to see what would happen.

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JustGeorge

Well, the families can finally rest now.

 

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