Joe Belfiore back at Microsoft


Recommended Posts

Dot Matrix
Quote

 

Grow the Microsoft Edge browser, expand Windows 10 and keep building cool devices. That’s was Microsoft’s Joe Belfiore’s job before he stepped away from Microsoft in October of 2015, and that’s pretty much his job today, with a few crucial enhancements. The difference, though, is what Belfiore learned during his months-long sabbatical.

 

Belfiore being attached to the same goals makes sense since Windows, Edge and devices remain central to the Microsoft success story. Windows 10, now two years in market, has 400 million installs and is generally well-regarded. As of Tuesday, we were on our second major update (Windows Creators Update). Microsoft Edge gets a significant refresh in this version of Windows 10, but, according to NetMarketShare, it has just 5% of the desktop browser market, trailing behind the browser it ostensibly replaced, Internet Explorer 11, and Google Chrome, which has almost 40%. 

Belfiore has his work cut out for him.

 

 

More: http://mashable.com/2017/04/11/belfiore-on-his-return-to-microsoft/?utm_cid=hp-n-1#V75vMKlydsqb

 

 

Welcome back, Joe! Here's hoping you can rescue Edge, and bring back Windows Phone/Lumia from the brink!

Link to post
Share on other sites
FloatingFatMan

There's no rescuing Edge from being behind Internet Explorer... That's beyond dead, that is! :p

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
+warwagon
12 hours ago, FloatingFatMan said:

There's no rescuing Edge from being behind Internet Explorer... That's beyond dead, that is! :p

 

 
 
 

They were even dumb enough to make the icon an E ...I think confusion runs in their blood. It's a support nightmare... Click on the E ..err the other E .... the solid blue E is not Internet Explorer it's EDGE ... it's completely different and the other blue E is internet explorer

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Gotenks98
8 minutes ago, warwagon said:

They were even dumb enough to make the icon an E ...I think confusion runs in their blood. It's a support nightmare... Click on the E ..err the other E .... the solid blue E is not Internet Explorer it's EDGE ... it's completely different and the other blue E is internet explorer

Couldn't agree more. Edge was dead on arrival due to 2 things. One is no ad-blocking addons at launch and the fact that the icon is an "e". They should have been doing everything in their power to distance themselves from IE by calling it something else. Hell they could have kept its code name Spartan and made the icon an S. It would be doing significantly better right now. What they essentially did by calling it Edge and keeping the icon an "e" is like calling Windows 10 Vista II or something else with Vista in the name (for the record I had zero issues with Vista).

Link to post
Share on other sites
Dot Matrix
42 minutes ago, warwagon said:

They were even dumb enough to make the icon an E ...I think confusion runs in their blood. It's a support nightmare... Click on the E ..err the other E .... the solid blue E is not Internet Explorer it's EDGE ... it's completely different and the other blue E is internet explorer

Why would they need to drastically alter the icon? To many, the blue 'e' means the Internet.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+warwagon
3 minutes ago, Dot Matrix said:

Why would they need to drastically alter the icon? To many, the blue 'e' means the Internet.

 
 
 
 
 

To most, a blue E means Internet Explorer. A lot of people think "They are using Internet Explorer" when in fact they are using Edge because they clicked the blue E. Which is ok, unless you have to give them phone support and them telling you they are in Internet explorer when they are actually in edge, conflicts with the instructions you are giving them. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Yogurth
12 hours ago, warwagon said:

To most, a blue E means Internet Explorer. A lot of people think "They are using Internet Explorer" when in fact they are using Edge because they clicked the blue E. Which is ok, unless you have to give them phone support and them telling you they are in Internet explorer when they are actually in edge, conflicts with the instructions you are giving them. 

 
 

indeed, even I received few phone calls that Internet Explorer is not working on few sites that it worked before. When I asked which OS they were using, it was Windows 10 and Edge was the culprit. had to explain how to find iexplore.exe and pin to taskbar.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+warwagon
2 hours ago, Yogurth said:

indeed, even I received few phone calls that Internet Explorer is not working on few sites that it worked before. When I asked which OS they were using, it was Windows 10 and Edge was the culprit. had to explain how to find iexplore.exe and pin to taskbar.

 
 

Or search for "Internet Explorer" in the start menu ;) ... then right click " to taskbar"

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
TPreston

Goup Policy, Security Zones, Addon Whitelisting please.

Link to post
Share on other sites
margrave

group policy to increase icon size, and weight on desktop please.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Abhay V
      Microsoft details the new Web Capture feature in Edge, now live in Canary and Dev builds
      by Abhay Venkatesh

      Earlier this month, a limited number of users began seeing a new ‘Web Capture’ feature in Edge Canary. As the name suggests, the feature lets users capture a screenshot of a web page on the browser and copy the image to a clipboard or save it. It partially mimics the capability that was present in legacy Edge that let users capture and annotate on the web.

      Today, Microsoft has officially detailed the feature as it makes its way to the Canary and Dev channel builds. The tool sits in the Settings menu accessed from the ellipsis icon (…) on the top right and can also be pinned to the toolbar. Selecting the icon automatically switches the screen to capture mode, where users can easily drag around to choose exactly what they want to capture.

      Interestingly, the feature also supports scroll capture. Users can drag the selection tool to the bottom of the webpage, which causes the page to scroll, allowing for capturing more than just the current view of the website. The tool can also be accessed using the Ctrl+Shift+S keyboard shortcut.

      The Redmond giant says that it is working to add more features such as the ability to ink on the screenshots, highlight sections, capture the entire webpage, and even annotate while scrolling through screenshots. For now, though, the only two options available on the selection tool include the ‘Copy’ and ‘Preview’ commands. The preview screen further provides options to save, share, or copy the image.

      While the firm did not mention any specific build numbers that are required for enabling the feature, Edge Dev and Canary users should begin seeing it in the current builds. The addition of this tool and the upcoming capabilities will be a welcome addition for those that leveraged this feature in Edge legacy and those that rely on taking quick notes from webpages.

    • By Rich Woods
      Eric Raymond thinks Microsoft is ready to swap out the Windows kernel for Linux
      by Rich Woods



      According to a blog post penned by open-source advocate Eric Raymond, Microsoft is finally ready to give up on that old relic it called Windows, which doesn't even generate enough revenue anymore to be more than a "sideshow" at the company. Raymond says that now that Azure makes so much more money than Windows does, the firm is set to replace Windows with Linux, which will run an emulation layer in order to maintain compatibility with legacy apps.

      The only problem is that none of that is true. Despite stagnant growth, Windows revenue is still among the most profitable pieces of Microsoft. Azure is set to surpass that someday, but that day is not today. Nevertheless, Raymond thinks that the more that this happens, the less Windows will be as a priority for Microsoft, and eventually, Windows development simply won't make sense.

      The speculation that Microsoft cares less about Windows than it once did (it's not even really speculation) isn't new, and it stands to reason that the firm will care even less down the line. But Raymond not only looks at Microsoft's finances as evidence; he looks at clues that are right in front of us. Those clues are, you guessed it, the Windows Subsystem for Linux and Microsoft's Edge browser coming to Linux.

      The latter is actually pretty easily explained, since it took such little work to bring Edge to Linux. Edge is based on Chromium now, and so it supports all of the platforms supported by Chromium. What probably should have been more notable is that Microsoft built Edge from Chromium in the first place, rather than continuing to develop its own in-house browser. The story with how Edge was rebuilt is quite similar to what Raymond is saying will happen with Windows.

      Windows does ship with a Linux kernel now with the latest Windows Subsystem for Linux, and as noted in the blog post, Microsoft does contribute to Linux in an effort to make WSL better.

      All of this adds up to, in Raymond's opinion, Microsoft rebuilding Windows from a Linux kernel, with a Windows emulation layer on top. Developers will be able to compile their apps to run natively if they wish, which is what Microsoft is already doing with Edge.

      While he does create a compelling argument for Microsoft wanting to do this, he doesn't account for whether or not Microsoft can do this. The Redmond firm is notoriously bad at getting app developers on board for something that it wants them to do; you can use Windows Phone or Windows on ARM as examples here. It's also not shown that it's great at emulation, with 32-bit emulation not being great on ARM PCs and 64-bit emulation not even here yet.

      What do you think? Is the year of desktop Linux finally on the way? Let us know in the comments!

    • By Namerah S
      Yakuza: Like a Dragon moved up to November 10 on consoles and PC, PS5 on March 2
      by Namerah Saud Fatmi

      A few days ago, Sega announced the release date for the latest Yakuza title on current-gen consoles and PC. Up until today, Yakuza: Like a Dragon was slated to arrive on said platforms on November 13, 2020, with no specific dates for next-gen consoles. Today Sega-owned video game developer RGG Studio moved up the previous launch of November 13 to November 10 for the PS4, Xbox One and PC.

      A release date for next-gen consoles was also unveiled today, with the newest entrant to the Yakuza series slated for November 10 on the Xbox Series X/S, and March 2, 2021, on the PlayStation 5.

      As is fast becoming the usual industry practice, current-gen console owners who purchase Yakuza: Like a Dragon will be able to upgrade to the next-gen version free of charge. PlayStation users will have to upgrade through the PS Store while Xbox users will be upgraded automatically via Smart Delivery.

      Apart from unveiling new release dates, today Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio also teased some gameplay footage of the upcoming installment in the Yakuza franchise on the PS5. The video is a little over a minute in length and showcases one of the enemies to be faced by players in the game. Those interested in watching it can find it on RGG Studio's official Twitter handle.

    • By Abhay V
      Microsoft's 12.5-inch Surface might be called the Laptop Go, reportedly launching this week
      by Abhay Venkatesh

      Surface Laptop 3 Rumors began making the rounds earlier this month about a more affordable, mid-range Surface laptop – codenamed Sparti – being in the works. The device is expected to house a 12.5-inch display, and cost around $699 for the lowest tier. That device, along with the refreshed Surface Pro X running the Microsoft SQ2 processor, is said to debut at an event as early as this week.

      Now, a new report suggests that the new mid-ranger and the Pro X 2 could be unveiled on October 1. The new 12.5-inch device is reportedly being referred to as the Surface Laptop Go by retailers, but the actual branding of the laptop is still unknown. The report also states that the entire line-up could be offered with a 10th-gen Core i5-1035G1, which is a 10nm chip without Iris Plus graphics. This move is supposedly being made to keep the components uniform to achieve lower costs. The firm could also be ditching the Windows Hello camera, moving to a power button mounted fingerprint sensor, for biometric authentication.

      Additionally, the Redmond giant is also said to be preparing an SKU of the device geared towards education customers that sports 4GB of RAM and 64GB of flash memory. The report also states that all storage configurations might come with cheaper flash memory modules – including the 256GB variant – instead of SSDs. The lowest-tier version might run Windows 10 Home in S Mode, with the more expensive SKUs being offered with Windows 10 Pro. Connectivity features include support for Wi-Fi 6 and Bluetooth 5.

      With the rumored launch not too far away, it will be interesting to see what the company has in store for this fall. However, for those looking for a refresh of the Pro or the Laptop, that might not be happening this year, so it’s best not to hold your breath for any major announcements.

      Source: WinFuture (German)

    • By anmol112
      Microsoft rolling out custom themes support for the new tab page on Edge
      by Anmol Mehrotra



      Back in 2018, Microsoft ditched EdgeHTML and adopted Google's Chromium framework for its web browser. Since then the company has been working alongside Google to improve the Chromium framework as well as Chromium-based Microsoft Edge.

      Now, Microsoft has added another feature to the Edge browser that allows users to download custom themes from the third-party stores and apply it to the new tab page (via Techdows). Earlier this year, the firm added support for themes from the Chrome Web Store, but these themes did not extend to the new tab page. Edge users can now follow the steps below to apply themes to the new tab page as well:

      Open Microsoft Edge and click on the gear icon on the top right side of the new tab page Click on 'Custom' and select 'Custom theme' under the 'Background' section This will apply the custom theme to the new tab page. If you haven't selected a theme, you can head to the 'Chrome Web Store' and add themes to Microsoft Edge.

      Do note that Microsoft is still rolling out the custom themes feature to Edge Beta and Stable users. If you encounter an error while installing a theme then you will need to enable the 'Allow installation of external store themes' flag. Once enabled, you will be able to install custom themes and you will be able to manage installed themes from Settings > Appearance > Custom themes.

      Along with custom themes, Microsoft has also added 'Preload the new tab page for a faster experience' option to Edge Canary and Dev. This allows the browser to pre-load the new tab page in the background to reduce the loading times. This option is currently limited to the Canary and Dev channel versions and can be managed from Settings > New tab page.