F9: Dragon CRS-11 - ISS resupply (mission thread)


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DocM

This will be the first Flight Proven™ Dragon mission, its first mission being Dragon CRS-4. 

 

Pad: LC-39A

Orbit: ISS logistics

Date: NET June 1

Time:   1755 Eastern, 2155 GMT

Stage landing: LZ-1

 

Major payloads

 

MUSES (Multi-User System for Earth Sensing) 

 

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/1282.html

 

Teledyne Brown is developing the Multiple User System for Earth Sensing (MUSES), an Earth imaging platform, as part of the company’s new commercial space-based digital imaging business. MUSES hosts earth-viewing instruments (Hosted Payloads), such as high-resolution digital cameras, hyperspectral imagers, and provides precision pointing and other accommodations. It hosts up to four instruments at the same time, and offers the ability to change, upgrade, and robotically service those instruments.

 

ROSA unrolled

2_dss_solar_array-1-1024x683.jpg

 

 

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Unobscured Vision

Niiiiice ... -er. :D 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Unobscured Vision

Next up on the manifest is this beauty ... lots of goodies on the menu here. :yes:(Y) No rest for SpaceX, but that's how they like it.

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DocM

And June 1 appears to be holding, so 17 days?

 

This cadence is getting nuts.

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Unobscured Vision

And they want to keep it up or even amp it up to 14 days? Yeah ... 

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DocM

Wait'll LC-40 and Boca Chica come online.

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Beittil
5 hours ago, DocM said:

And June 1 appears to be holding, so 17 days?

 

This cadence is getting nuts.

About frackin time too that the cadence is going nuts :D THIS is what they have been shooting for basically for the last two years and the past month is for the first time that actually managed to stick to it! 

 

Pew pew...

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DocM

They certainly have been trying, save for the issues of others. Before this it was once a month after Amos-6 RTF, then depending on whose list you use for June on.......

March 16: EchoStar 23
March 30: SES-10

gap due to Cygnus priority, the Atlas V oil leak and NROL-76 payload issues

May 1: NROL-76
May 15: Inmarsat-5 F4

Now 3 upcoming NET's in June,

June 1: CRS-11 (Flight Proven™ reuse of the CRS-4 Dragon)
June 15: BulgariaSat-1 (Flight Proven™ core)
June 29: Iridium NEXT #2 (Vandy)

 

and 3 undated launches in July,

SES-11
Koreasat 5A
FormoSat-5 (Vandy)

 

Sometime this summer LC-40 returns and LC-39A closes for 45-60 days for the final Commercial Crew and Falcon Heavy upgrades (4 new hold downs, the crew arm etc.), then it's a sprint to Dec 31 with 3 pads shooting. 

 

Then comes Boca Chica in 2018.

 

:woot:

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DocM

Falcon 9 Super Sport?

 

If F9 Super Sport isn't a version name it damned well should be given how it jumped off the pad with a 6 tonne satellite on board.

 

 

 

Edited by DocM
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Unobscured Vision

:huh::shifty::woot: Oh those clever ... 

 

*cough* 

 

Well well well ... looks like we've seen the debut of something that we weren't expecting ...

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DocM

CRS-11 shipment party

 

CRS-11_shipment_party.thumb.jpg.c7af657ee61bc12c2b922773b2fb142f.jpg

 

ISS completed missions tag. All it needs is nose art :)

 

CRS-11_mission_tag.thumb.jpg.16d59768ed196292fe24e37f034e11d0.jpg

 

 

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DocM

The run-up to CRS-11 is going so smooth the static fire has moved left  a day :woot:

 

Old static fire: Saturday, May 27

New static fire: Friday, May 26 

 

Launch: Thursday, June 1

Launch time: 1755 EDT (2155 GMT)

Stage Landing: LZ-1

 

Quote

 

MEDIA ADVISORY M17-063


NASA to Air Launch of Next International Space Station Resupply Mission

NASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting its eleventh commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station for 5:55 p.m. EDT Thursday, June 1. Launch coverage will begin on NASA Television and the agency’s website at 5:15 p.m., followed by the post-launch news conference at 7:30 p.m.

The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft will liftoff on the company's Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying almost 6,000 pounds of science research, crew supplies and hardware to the orbiting laboratory in support of Expedition 52 and 53 crew members. The unpressurized trunk of the spacecraft also will transport solar panels, tools for Earth-observation and equipment to study neutron stars.

About 10 minutes after launch, Dragon will reach its preliminary orbit. It then will deploy its solar arrays and begin a carefully choreographed series of thruster firings to reach the space station. When it arrives to the space station, Expedition 52 Flight Engineers Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson of NASA will grapple Dragon.

Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture will begin at 8:30 a.m. Sunday, June 4, on NASA TV, with installation coverage set to begin at 11:30 a.m. If the launch does not occur on June 1, the next launch opportunity is 5:07 p.m. Saturday, June 3, with NASA TV coverage starting at 4:30 p.m.

The Dragon spacecraft will remain at the space station until approximately July 2, when it will return to Earth with research and return cargo in a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of Baja California.

Media at Kennedy will have the opportunity to participate in special tours and briefings May 31 and June 1, as well as view the launch. The deadline for media to apply for accreditation for this launch has passed, but for more information about media accreditation, contact Jennifer Horner at 321-867-6598 or jennifer.p.horner@nasa.gov.

This will be the 100th launch, and sixth SpaceX launch, from this pad. Previous launches include 11 Apollo flights, the launch of the unmanned Skylab in 1973, 82 shuttle flights and five SpaceX launches.

For an updated schedule of prelaunch briefings, events and NASA TV coverage, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/spacex-crs-11-briefings-and-events

Learn more about the SpaceX CRS-11 mission at:

https://www.nasa.gov/spacex

-end-

 

 

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Unobscured Vision

Busy June, so yeah they're trying to move ahead with the technical work. Get the CRS up on the Falcon-9 ASAP so that they can get the next one going. Time saved is .. well, time saved. :D:yes: 

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DocM

Today's Static Fire window is 1600-2000 Eastern

 

Also: StarTrackCom reports that when CRS-11 arrives at ISS, USA-276 (pka NROL-76) will be nearby. I suggest reading the entire blog post.

 

https://sattrackcam.blogspot.nl/2017/05/observing-usa-276-odd-nrol-76-payload.html

 

Observers in Europe might see the three objects close together in their evening twilight of June 3, with USA 276 some 15 degrees distant from the ISS.

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DocM

/sigh

 

Static fire moved back to Saturday. 

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DocM

MEDIA ADVISORY M11-17

 

SpaceX CRS-11 Briefings and Events

 

NASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting its eleventh commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station for 5:55 p.m. EDT Thursday, June 1. Launch coverage will begin on NASA Television and the agency’s website at 5:15 p.m., followed by the post-launch news conference at 7:30 p.m.

 

The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft will liftoff on the company's Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying almost 6,000 pounds of science research, crew supplies and hardware to the orbiting laboratory in support of the Expedition 52 and 53 crew members. The unpressurized trunk of the spacecraft also will transport solar panels, tools for Earth-observation and equipment to study neutron stars.

About 10 minutes after launch, Dragon will reach its preliminary orbit. It then will deploy its solar arrays and begin a carefully choreographed series of thruster firings to reach the space station. When it arrives to the space station, Expedition 52 Flight Engineers Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson of NASA will grapple Dragon.

 

Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture will begin at 8:30 a.m. Sunday, June 4, on NASA TV, with installation coverage set to begin at 11:30 a.m. If the launch does not occur on June 1, the next launch opportunity is 5:07 p.m. Saturday, June 3, with NASA TV coverage starting at 4:30 p.m.

 

The Dragon spacecraft will remain at the space station until approximately July 2, when it will return to Earth with research and return cargo in a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of Baja California.

 

Media at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida will have the opportunity to participate in special tours and briefings May 31 and June 1, as well as view the launch. The deadline for media to apply for accreditation for this launch has passed. For more information about media accreditation, contact Jennifer Horner at 321-867-6598 or jennifer.p.horner@nasa.gov.

 

Media badges will be issued at the Astronaut Training Experience building located on State Road 405, Titusville.

This will be the 100th launch, and sixth SpaceX launch, from this pad. Previous launches include 11 Apollo flights, the launch of the unmanned Skylab in 1973, 82 shuttle flights and five SpaceX launches.

 

L-1 Day

 

Press Site Hours of Operation: 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Badging Hours of Operation: 7 – 8:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., and 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. (Media badges will be issued at the Astronaut Training Experience)

 

Media participating in the morning tour will need to be at the press site no later than 9 a.m. Interested media must RSVP to ksc-media-accreditat@mail.nasa.gov no later than 4 p.m. on May 29.

 

Space Farming

 

Several NASA researchers will discuss their work to grow food for human deep-space exploration missions. They will discuss the Advanced Plant Habitat as well as other long-duration food production research currently underway.

Media participating in the morning tour will return to the press site at noon.  

 

Commercial Crew Program Update

 

The NASA Commercial Crew Program has partnered with American industry on the next generation of spacecraft and rockets that will launch astronauts to and from the International Space Station. At 1 p.m. in the Press Site, Commercial Crew Program management will provide an update to media on the progress being made to resume human spaceflight in the United States.

 

“What’s on Board” Science Briefing on NASA TV

 

A science, research and technology briefing will air live at 1 p.m. on NASA Television and the agency’s website, at http://www.nasa.gov/ntv. This briefing is for NASA Social participants.

 

One-on-One Interview Opportunities

 

Media will have the opportunity to interview mission experts at the Press Site from 2:30 – 4 p.m.

 

Prelaunch News Conference on NASA TV 

 

A prelaunch status briefing will be held at Kennedy’s Press Site TV Auditorium at 4 p.m. and air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

 

L-0 Day

 

Press Site Hours of Operation: 6 a.m. – 9 p.m.

 

Badging Hours of Operation: 5 – 6:15 a.m., and 3 - 4 p.m. (Media badges will be issued at the Astronaut Training Experience)

 

Media participating in the morning event will need to be at the press site no later than 6:45 a.m.  

 

Remote Camera Setup and Photo Opportunity 

 

A limited number of news media will be able to establish sound-activated remote cameras to capture the liftoff from inside Launch Complex 39A. Interested media must RSVP to ksc-media-accreditat@mail.nasa.gov no later than 4 p.m. on May 29.

 

Following launch, remote camera pickup for inside the launch complex will be Friday, June 2 at 8 a.m.

 

All other remote camera photographers will be able to set up cameras outside of the pad perimeter. This also will be the location of the photo opportunity. Interested media must RSVP to ksc-media-accreditat@mail.nasa.gov no later than 4 p.m. on May 29.

 

Following launch, remote camera pickup for outside the launch complex will be 8:30 p.m.

 

Media participating in the morning event will return to the press site at 9:30 a.m.  

 

Launch Viewing 

 

News media wanting to view the launch from the NASA Causeway will depart the Press Site by bus at 4:30 p.m. Interested media must RSVP to ksc-media-accreditat@mail.nasa.gov no later than 4 p.m. on May 29.

 

Media desiring to photograph the launch from the roof of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) must RSVP to ksc-media-accreditat@mail.nasa.gov no later than 4 p.m. on May 29. Space is limited for this activity. At 4:45 p.m., selected media will depart the Press Site for the VAB.

 

NASA TV Launch Coverage

 

NASA TV live coverage will begin at 5:15 p.m. For NASA TV downlink information, schedules and links to streaming video, visit:

 

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

 

Audio only of the news conferences and launch coverage will be carried on the NASA “V” circuits, which may be accessed by dialing 321-867-1220, -1240, -1260 or -7135. On launch day, "mission audio," the launch conductor’s countdown activities without NASA TV launch commentary, will be carried on 321-867-7135. Launch also will be available on local amateur VHF radio frequency 146.940 MHz heard within Brevard County on the Space Coast.

 

NASA Web Prelaunch and Launch Coverage 

 

Prelaunch and launch day coverage of the SpaceX CRS-11 flight will be available on the NASA website. Coverage will include live streaming and blog updates beginning at 5:15 p.m. as the countdown milestones occur. On-demand streaming video, podcast and photos of the launch will be available shortly after liftoff. For questions about countdown coverage, contact the newsroom at 321-867-2468. You can follow countdown coverage on our launch blog at:

 

http://blogs.nasa.gov/spacex

 

Post-launch News Conference on NASA TV 

 

A post-launch news conference will occur at about 7:30 p.m. in Kennedy’s Press Site TV Auditorium and air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Learn more about the SpaceX CRS-11 mission by going to the mission home page at:

 

http://www.nasa.gov/spacex

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FloatingFatMan
19 hours ago, DocM said:

/sigh

 

Static fire moved back to Saturday. 

You put your left leg in, your left leg out, in out, in out, you shake it all about...

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DocM

Static fire now Sunday.

 

Problem with a quick disconnect fitting.

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Unobscured Vision

Oh. So it wasn't a problem with them, it's a mechanical problem that needed fixing. Okay then. That kind of thing happens sometimes.

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DocM

Rolled out for the static fire.

 

Windows have been 1200-1800 Eastern +/-

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DocM

That didn't take long

 

 

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DocM

NASA's patch references the recycled Flight Proven™ Cargo Dragon,  the Roll Out Solar Array (ROSA) testbed, and the totally cool Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) instrument in its Trunk.

 

'SPX-7' is the NASA paperwork designation for this mission, but CRS-7 is the most commonly used.

spacex_crs11_nasapatch01-lg.jpg

More about NICER 

 

 

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DocM

Rolled out, preparing to go vertical.

 

Payloads presser

 

 

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DocM

 

post-10859-0-27446500-1496273402.jpg

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