General Space Discussion (Thread 1)


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Draggendrop

SpaceX needs to really ramp this up now....today ticked me off with NASA...and I'm trying to be polite.

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DocM

 

Say: ear-tish

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DocM

https://spacenews.com/advisory-committee-seeks-to-enhance-commercial-space-activities/

 

Quote

Advisory committee seeks to enhance commercial space activities

 

WASHINGTON — A new advisory committee has proposed a set of recommendations to NASA in areas ranging from export control to advertising to enhance commercial activities in space.

 

The Regulatory and Policy Committee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC) met for the first time Nov. 16 at NASA Headquarters here. The committee, announced at the council’s last meeting in August and comprised primarily of representatives of space companies, is tasked with examining issues associated with commercialization of NASA activities and the agency's support for commercial space.

"This is a big change for the NAC," said Mike Gold of Maxar Technologies, chairman of the committee. "For a while I was the only industry representative on the NAC, and now we have a committee full of industry representatives. I think that is representative of the shifts occurring in industry, and I greatly appreciate NASA being willing to go in this direction."

Over the course of the three-hour inaugural meeting, the committee approved a series of observations, findings and recommendations on several topics. Among them was a perennial area of concern for the space industry, export controls. "Second only to gravity, the ITAR had the greatest chance of keeping our spacecraft on the ground," said Gold, referring to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, which for many years covered satellites and related components.
>

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Draggendrop
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TDIH. On the photo: The memorial in Nakhabino in honor of the launch of the first Soviet liquid-propellant rockets - GIRD-09 and GIRD-X. Sergei Korolev in 1933. #SpaceHistory

https://twitter.com/katlinegrey/status/1066715642890457088

 

Ds28OV9X4AA9E1a.thumb.jpg.f4436526222dcde8e42181084ed7df52.jpg

 

Ds28OPUXcAAlrPw.thumb.jpg.16a07264a8e77fa40ee45ae5f981f8ec.jpg

 

This is neat...forgotten history...to most...

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Draggendrop

I have been harping on this for years....finally going to be taken seriously...

 

 

A mother ship as comm central...and unleash the little ones....

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Draggendrop

 

Astra maybe....Vector has been talking about a launch test soon as well.

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Unobscured Vision

Ooooh ...

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Draggendrop
18 hours ago, Draggendrop said:

 

Astra maybe....Vector has been talking about a launch test soon as well.

update...

 

 

It appears that the odds are good that the launcher is from Astra.

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Draggendrop

 

Thank you to Stephen...he's always on the hunt...

 

 

 

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Draggendrop

busy day...

 

 

any idea's...

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Unobscured Vision

Hmmm ....

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DocM

Whatever it is Maricopa will spend a ton of money and be sited at Launch Complex 20, a former Titan I/III pad near the North end of ICBM Road.

 

Rumors: Firefly or Relativity Space

 

Concept pic 

325086939_Maricopa-SpaceFlorida.thumb.jpg.9767b6d6b914109ec7d07e11dff0243b.jpg

 

Edited by DocM
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Unobscured Vision

Not far from where Gemini launches took place (LC-16). :yes: 

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DocM

Speaking of Relativity Space, last Sunday night CBS's 60 Minutes newsmagazine did a story on them and their tech.

 

Relativity's innovation is a gigantic 3D printer which can not only print engine parts but entire rocket propellant tanks and structure,

 

 

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Unobscured Vision

Makes me wonder if SpaceX is going to employ FSW to fab the Al tank shells on Starship. It'd make them drastically stronger (lighter and thinner) and avoid the issues that have plagued SLS dev.

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Draggendrop

 

Experience will help here...

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DocM

He's also done much to promote commercial space activities at the Cape.

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Draggendrop

Have you guys noticed the number of mistakes being released by NASA media lately...every week it seems that there is a "facepalm" event.

 

This weeks...

 

 Vikings were RTG's....doh....

 

--------------------------------------------

 

 

But then again, the SLS is one "bull cookie" event after another....great source of entertainment.

 

//

 

NASA really needs to consider having a "historian" review a lot of their media releases.

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DocM

And Keith didn't use the latest image of BFR. The 2017 design was 106 meters.  It's now 118 meters.

 

 

Edited by DocM
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Jim K

Dang... 4.5k watt hours ... just on solar.  Impressive.

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Draggendrop

SpaceNews Awards 2018

https://spacenews.com/awards/awards-18/

 

Breakthrough of the year.....Falcon Heavy

 

Company of the year......Iridium

 

Startup of the year....Rocket Lab

 

Unsung hero of the year...Tom Mueller

 

Check out the rest and the writeups at the above link...

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Draggendrop

 

Took long enough...but this is great...support small sat launch...use the extra money for science.

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Unobscured Vision

Ooooh ... all of us had high hopes for it. :yes: Sweet!

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