International Space Station - Mission Status and Updates (Thread 2)


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Draggendrop

 

 

 

 

 

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Unobscured Vision

No problem for the Soyuz. That section gets jettisoned before reentry. Shouldn't affect ops.

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Draggendrop

They will probably close the bulkhead as a precaution against leakage though.

 

Once the section has separation...back to normal.

 

Should be fine...but the "optics" take a hit...

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Draggendrop

Expedition 57

 

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Wednesday, Dec. 19, 4:45 p.m.: Expedition 57 crew farewell at International Space Station and Soyuz spacecraft hatch closure. Hatch closure is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. EST.

 

Wednesday, Dec. 19, 7:45 p.m.: Undocking of the Soyuz spacecraft with the International Space Station Expedition 57 crew. Undocking is scheduled at 8:42 p.m. EST.

 

Wednesday, Dec. 19, 10:45 p.m.: Coverage of Soyuz deorbit burn and landing with the Expedition 57 crew. Deorbit burn scheduled at 11:09 p.m. EST with landing scheduled at 12:03 a.m. EST, Dec. 20.

NASA youtube channel...at the link...

https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

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Draggendrop

ISS reboost...

 

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On December 27 at 06:05 CET the planned correction of the orbit of the International Space Station was carried out – https://www.roscosmos.ru/25895/

 

 

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Draggendrop

Dragon Departing Station Next Week; Crew Studies Biology

 

blog_iss058e001781.jpg

The SpaceX Dragon cargo craft is pictured attached to the International Space Station almost 257 miles above Quebec on New Year’s Eve.

 

 

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The SpaceX Dragon cargo craft is in its final week attached to the International Space Station’s Harmony module. Meanwhile, robotics experts on the ground and the crew aboard the lab are working a wide variety of science activities today.

 

The Dragon space freighter has nearly completed its cargo mission to replenish the orbital laboratory after delivering over 5,600 pounds of science and supplies Dec. 8. Dragon will return to Earth Jan. 10 for retrieval in the Pacific Ocean loaded with completed science experiments and used hardware for analysis.

 

New space exposure experiments are being remotely installed outside the station today using a specialized robotic hand known as Dextre. Also, astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques collected biological samples today for stowage and later analysis. The duo then split up for more science work including testing crew brain function and removing science hardware that explores stem cells and other biological processes.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/04/dragon-departing-station-next-week-crew-studies-biology/

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Draggendrop

Just in....

 

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Roscskus waits for official explanations of NASA's position on the organization of the return visit of the Russian delegation in the USA in accordance with the previously received invitation.

 

 

 

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Preparation of the negotiating position of the State corporation on Cooperation of the Parties on the program of the International Space Station and distant space is not yet suspended.

 

 

NASA admin and Congress will have to explain this one...for official capacities....politics will mess this up good.

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DocM

Putin likely appointed Rogozin to Roskosmos to force this kind of reaction so he could use it  politically. Now our politicos, both sides, are playing right into Putin's strategy.

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Unobscured Vision

As much as I dislike this line of thinking regarding Space ... yeah. That's the real issue here.

 

This frontier has been, sadly, used as a political tool before and while it has expanded the technologies far earlier and more broadly than otherwise it's a nasty practice. Humanity should and must be better than that. It's beneath us to stoop to such levels. Response, counter-response. Jab, counter, uppercut.

 

:no: Sure says a lot about us as a species if this is our focus based upon politics and one-upping the other. 

 

I believe the ISS should end, considering the political climate on both sides. Repurpose Commercial Crew for other uses.

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Jim K
34 minutes ago, Unobscured Vision said:

I believe the ISS should end, considering the political climate on both sides. Repurpose Commercial Crew for other uses.

I disagree. The ISS is a venue showing that people from all over the world can work together and discover scientific/medical/etc. breakthroughs. 

 

Long live the ISS and international cooperation (as long as the ISS continues to be structurally safe/financially viable).

 

Besides, this was a NASA screw up.

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SteveL
On 1/7/2019 at 9:36 PM, Jim K said:

I disagree. The ISS is a venue showing that people from all over the world can work together and discover scientific/medical/etc. breakthroughs. 

 

Long live the ISS and international cooperation (as long as the ISS continues to be structurally safe/financially viable).

 

Besides, this was a NASA screw up.

I agree with you, but there is something that bothers me. Why not invite China? (Let's forget India for now) If this is truly a mankind asset to share between people from every human race then there is no reason to not have China onboard.

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DocM
5 hours ago, slear said:

I agree with you, but there is something that bothers me. Why not invite China? (Let's forget India for now) If this is truly a mankind asset to share between people from every human race then there is no reason to not have China onboard.

 

3 words: the Wolf Amendment. It was dropped into a 2011 spending bill by Rep. Frank Wolf (R-Va) because of Chinese industrial espionage,

 

https://www.chron.com/news/nation-world/space/article/Ever-wonder-why-you-ve-never-seen-a-Chinese-12631096.php

 

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 "China is spying against us, and every U.S. government agency has been hit by cyber-attacks. They are stealing technology from every major U.S. company. They have taken technology from NASA, and they have hit the [National Science Foundation] computers . . . . You name the company, and the Chinese are trying to get its secrets."

 

In the broad sense he's not wrong, this behavior has been ongoing since the 1990's and is a major part of the US-China trade tiff and talks, but in the case of NASA data it's misdirected; almost all of what they accessed was on public servers.

 

We can quibble if the NASA data  should have been so easy to  access, but that it was is on the US not China.

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Unobscured Vision

Yep. If China would just play by the rules they'd already be a partner on the ISS and be allowed to fly joint missions with us. As @DocM pointed out, it's been going on since the 1990's.

 

In contrast, India has been doing everything on their own and doing it correctly. Watch -- in 10 years they'll be doing CDR on their manned programme and other audits on their standards & practices for participation in upcoming Cislunar and even Lunar Village & Mars. :yes: 

 

China is concerned with quantity, India is focused on quality.

 

(Of course, SpaceX is changing the whole industry entirely, so expect a paradigm shift in that direction.)

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DocM

 

Rogozin must have squeezed out a brick over Russians riding US "trampolines"

 

😁

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DocM

New ISS module progressing,

 

"The multifunctional Laboratory Module (MLM ISS) ' Nauka ' [Science] will leave the shops of the Khrunichev Center in August this year and be transported to RSC Energia for pre-flight tests. This decision was made today at the meeting in Korolev with participation of the general designers."

 

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