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Falcon 9: Dragon CRS-12 mission thread

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DocM    16,580

Remember when they talked about using a high AoA (angle of attack) to get more lift on the returning stages, basically to extend their glide range? 

 

Little did we know :woot:

 

CRS-12_AoA-full.thumb.jpg.051b8fc38fbb3ecfb36818ebafa52831.jpg

 

Enhanced....WOW!! Almost a test of the ITS side-entry control technique just before vertical rotation.

 

CRS-12_AoA.thumb.jpg.b0154421f33f3c906d4f921cacba0eb4.jpg

Edited by DocM
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Unobscured Vision    2,676

The Post-Launch Conference was VERY interesting from a "items of interest" standpoint.

 

- Looking at a decision for reused Boosters for CRS Missions by the end of September (I think they'll approve of using them)

- Hans believes that they're "96% ready" with Dragon 2, still in qualification testing on some hardware

- NASA wants a "high cadence" capability by mid-to-late FY2019 in Commercial Crew

- They'll select the four (!!!) Astronaut Teams in a month

 

AWww yeah. :yes: 

 

 

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DocM    16,580

Press conference transcript. Interesting tidbits,

 

NASA hopes to make a decision on using Flight Proven™ boosters by the end of September. 

 

Dragon 2 cargo missions could commence earlier than CRS Round 2 contract start to get extra experience flying the new  airframe.

 

SpaceX plans on picking up where they left off WRT the fast launch cadence.

 

https://gist.github.com/theinternetftw/c628dbb6ce20e7e2b7bde76f650c5e53

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Unobscured Vision    2,676

I think SpaceX is still getting the hang of building Dragon 2's. I'm sure that tightening up workflow and procedures is gonna be on the short list very, very soon if they aren't already figuring it out. At the rate they'll be flying them, it wouldn't surprise me at all if the production target is one a month by this time next year.

 

They'll get it sorted. :yes: 

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DocM    16,580

 

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DocM    16,580

Coming home,

 

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/us-cargo-ship-set-to-depart-from-international-space-station

 

After delivering more than 6,400 pounds of cargo, a SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft will depart the International Space Station on Sunday, Sept. 17. NASA Television and the agencys website will provide live coverage of Dragon's departure beginning at 4:30 a.m. EDT.



Flight controllers will use the space stations Canadarm2 robotic arm to detach Dragon, which arrived Aug. 16, from the Earth-facing side of the station's Harmony module. After Dragon is maneuvered into place, the spacecraft will be released by Expedition 53 Flight Engineer Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency) with the assistance of station Commander Randy Bresnik of NASA at 4:47 a.m.

Dragons thrusters will be fired to move the spacecraft a safe distance from the station before SpaceX flight controllers in Hawthorne, California, command its deorbit burn. The spacecraft will splash down at about 10:16 a.m. in the Pacific Ocean, where recovery forces will retrieve Dragon and approximately 3,800 pounds of cargo. This will include science samples from human and animal research, biology and biotechnology studies, physical science investigations and education activities. The deorbit burn and splashdown will not be broadcast on NASA TV.

NASA and the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), the nonprofit organization that manages research aboard the U.S. national laboratory portion of the space station, will receive time-sensitive samples and begin working with researchers to process and distribute them within 48 hours of splashdown.

In the event of adverse weather conditions in the Pacific, the backup departure and splashdown date is Sept. 20.

Dragon, the only space station resupply spacecraft currently able to return to Earth intact, launched Aug. 14 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, for the companys 12th NASA-contracted commercial resupply mission to the station.

Keep up with the International Space Station, and its research and crew, at:

https://www.nasa.gov/station

-end-

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DocM    16,580

 

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DocM    16,580

And this completes the original 12 launch Commercial Resupply Services contract.

 

With CRS -13, SpaceX  begins the 8 extra missions which NASA purchased separately.

 

@SpaceX
Good splashdown of Dragon confirmed, completing its 12th mission to and from the @Space_Station.

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