U.N. Security Council votes to step up sanctions on North Korea

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techbeck    4,965

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United Nations Security Council unanimously stepped up sanctions against North Korea on Monday over the country’s sixth and most powerful nuclear test on Sept. 3, imposing a ban on the country’s textile exports and capping imports of crude oil.

 

It was the ninth sanctions resolution unanimously adopted by the 15-member council since 2006 over North Korea’s ballistic missile and nuclear programs. The United States watered down an initial tougher draft resolution to win the support of Pyongyang ally China and Russia.

 

A week ago, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley called for the “strongest possible” sanctions on North Korea and had sought an oil embargo on Pyongyang.

 

On Monday, Haley said the United States was not looking for war with North Korea and that Pyongyang had “not yet passed the point of no return.”

 

“If it agrees to stop its nuclear program, it can reclaim its future. If it proves it can live in peace, the world will live in peace with it,” she told the Security Council after the council adopted the new sanctions.

 

More....

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-northkorea-missiles/u-n-security-council-votes-to-step-up-sanctions-on-north-korea-idUSKCN1BL12S

 

China said recently they were going to support/push for more sanctions.   I really doubt more sanctions is going to do a lick of good.  Should just kidnap both Trump and Un and lock them in a room together.  The one still standing after an 30 minutes, wins.

 

And please keep the discussion, if any, civil and on topic.

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+E.worm Jimmy    9,923

Unless the USA and South Korea stop waiving their ducks around the North Korea will try to react.

 

Sanction have no meaning to them. Did they not say they will stop if the military exercises close to their borders are stopped?

 

They might lie... But were they ever given a chance?

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techbeck    4,965
51 minutes ago, E.worm Jimmy said:

Did they not say they will stop if the military exercises close to their borders are stopped?

 

They might lie... But were they ever given a chance?

 

I really don't think NK will stop if the US stops their military exercises.  IMO, they will make more demands after.  Stopping exercises in the area, US presence will still be there and unchanged.  So what have they really done at this point?  Stopping military exercises he is threaten by while keeping the same amount of US presence in the area.  He has done little to nothing at this point  Plus, Un is all about control and power.  Stopping his weapons program will make him look weak in front of his people.   Un just wants the US out of the area and this is how he is trying to do it and it is not going to happen.  And say if the US does agree to stop military exercises.  Think NK would open up to investigators to make sure their nuclear weapons program has been dismantled?  UN is going to want proof here and I don't see Un letting them in.

 

I say, stop exercises in the area and see what happens.  Move them to the US shores.  IF NK stops their weapons program and are able to prove they have done so, great.  If not...then they better be prepared for the consequences.

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techbeck    4,965
+ctebah    2,744
1 hour ago, E.worm Jimmy said:

Unless the USA and South Korea stop waiving their ducks around the North Korea will try to react.

 

Sanction have no meaning to them. Did they not say they will stop if the military exercises close to their borders are stopped?

 

They might lie... But were they ever given a chance?

What a lot of people don't realize is that it was the US who broke promises years ago when it came to North Korea.

 

Yet there are people out there saying that "we are not sure if we can trust North Korea."  

 

It's laughable.

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300z    228

It really baffles me that after the catastrophe that was Iraq, the Wikileaks and Snowden revelations people still buy into the US government narrative. Lie after lie, broken promise after broken promise, how the hell people still put so much trust into that government?

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+ctebah    2,744
Just now, 300z said:

It really baffles me that after the catastrophe that was Iraq, the Wikileaks and Snowden revelations people still buy into the US government narrative. Lie after lie, broken promise after broken promise, how the hell people still put so much trust into that government?

Certain parts of the population are so brainwashed, it would make Goebbels proud.

 

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+FloatingFatMan    13,133
9 hours ago, ctebah said:

What a lot of people don't realize is that it was the US who broke promises years ago when it came to North Korea.

 

Yet there are people out there saying that "we are not sure if we can trust North Korea."  

 

It's laughable.

Which ones, exactly?

 

Note: I'm not doubting you, just asking for clarification.

 

Also, I trust America about as far as I can throw it...

 

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techbeck    4,965

This is about NK sanctions that were imposed and agreed on by multiple countries including China and Russia.    Not a blame/bash US thread.

 

And if posting/claiming anything, include source links please.

 

Anyway, nothing is going to get resolved unless all parties involved sit down and discuss/talk.  Right now, the lines of communication are closed.  Which will do no good.

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+ctebah    2,744
2 hours ago, FloatingFatMan said:

Which ones, exactly?

 

Note: I'm not doubting you, just asking for clarification.

 

Also, I trust America about as far as I can throw it...

 

Every single promise under the 1994 framework was broken.  The US didn’t hold true to a single thing it signed.  

 



The light-water reactors were never built. The US-led consortium tasked with constructing them was in severe debt; senators accused Clinton of understating their cost while overstating how much US allies would contribute to funding them. Hawkish Republicans in Congress derided the framework for supposedly rewarding aggressive behaviour.

Heavy fuel shipments were often delayed. Rust Deming, assistant secretary of state, told Congress that “to be frank, we have in past years not always met the fuel year deadline”. Meanwhile, Robert Gallucci, a diplomat who had negotiated the framework, warned that it could failunless the US did “what it said it would do, which is to take responsibility for the delivery of the heavy fuel oil”.

North Korea was not removed from the state department’s list of state sponsors of terrorism until 2008, though it had long met the criteria for removal. A limited number of US sanctions were eased, but not until 2000 – six years later than pledged in the agreed framework. According to Gallucci, Congressional scepticism about the deal led to “the minimum interpretation of sanctions lifting”. As he told a congressional committee: “the North Koreans have always been disappointed that more has not been done by the US.”

Most importantly, no action was taken to formally end the Korean War – which was never technically ended – by replacing the 1953 ceasefire with a peace treaty. The “formal assurances” that the US would not attack North Korea were not provided until six years after the framework was signed. In the meantime, the Clinton administration unhelpfully persisted in labelling North Korea a “backlash” or “rogue” state, and throughout the 1990s, US military planning was based on the concept of fighting a simultaneous two-front war against Iraq and North Korea.

This only worsened under Washington’s next regime: in 2002, the Bush administration’s nuclear posture review listed North Korea as one country the US might have to use nuclear weapons against, while its 2002 national security strategy listed the north as a “rogue” regime against which the US should be prepared to use force. To this day, the US has 28,500 troops stationed across 11 US military bases in South Korea, and the two countries continue with their joint annual military exercisesoff the coast of the Korean Peninsula.

 

And this is on top of bringing nukes to the peninsula after promising not to do so.  Then North Korea got to watch Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya get destroyed. 

 

And then, like I already stated, uneducated people say “but we can’t trust North Korea.”  It’s the US that can’t be trusted, North Korea has shown its more than interested in negotiating.  

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techbeck    4,965

If anyone is looking for a source link since apparently it is hard for some people to post links....

http://theconversation.com/why-the-uss-1994-deal-with-north-korea-failed-and-what-trump-can-learn-from-it-80578

 

And keep the insults out of the convo please.  No need to call people brainwashed or uneducated because some may disagree with what you say.

 

Thanks

3 hours ago, FloatingFatMan said:

Which ones, exactly?

 

Note: I'm not doubting you, just asking for clarification.

 

Also, I trust America about as far as I can throw it...

 

Since a source was not posted, see my link above.

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techbeck    4,965

And an educated person would realize that this is not just the US wanting NK to stop .  A lot of other countries want them to stop as well and all this is not just coming from the US.  UN sanctions were voted unanimously by the UN council including Russia and China.  Everyone is on board here.

 

But anyway....more empty NK threats

 

 

North Korea lashes out over ‘vicious’ U.N. sanctions 

 

SEOUL — North Korea on Tuesday condemned the U.N. Security Council’s decision to impose tougher sanctions and doubled down on its warning that the United States would “suffer the greatest pain” it has ever experienced for leading the effort to ratchet up economic pressures on the reclusive nation.

 

The United Nations on Monday unanimously agreed on its toughest sanctions against North Korea, setting limits on its oil imports and banning its textile exports. The United States and its allies had pushed for new sanctions to increase pressure on North Korea to agree to negotiations.

 

“My delegation condemns in the strongest terms and categorically rejects the latest illegal and unlawful U.N. Security Council resolution,” North Korean Ambassador Han Tae Song told the U.N.-sponsored Conference on Disarmament in Geneva, according to Reuters.

 

Han said North Korea is “ready to use a form of ultimate means” but did not elaborate, the news agency reported.

 

More....

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/north-korea-lashes-out-over-vicious-un-sanctions/2017/09/12/88be9caa-97b9-11e7-af6a-6555caaeb8dc_story.html?utm_term=.b96d17d31f15

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Andrew    2,678

Topic cleaned

 

It is time that members stop insulting people, directly or indirectly, while trying to discuss these political topics. If you preface your argument that anyone who disagrees with you is uneducated or brainwashed, then you need to stop typing and walk away from the topic. Facts can be disputed and it is not anyone's place to insult a member when they do so.

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techbeck    4,965

^

TY

 

Japan warns of 'last chance' on North Korea with calls for tighter Australian sanctions

 

A senior Japanese official has warned the world faces its "last chance" to rein in North Korea's nuclear program and said it is "very helpful" for countries including Australia to tighten the sanctions noose by targeting firms around the world that help Pyongyang dodge United Nations penalties.

 

The official was speaking shortly before the UN Security Council voted in favour of imposing tighter sanctions on the rogue regime but stopped well short of what Washington and its allies wanted, with China and Russia threatening to veto tougher measures.

 

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop welcomed the UN vote but pointedly noted the "special responsibility" of veto-wielding powers that continue to do business with North Korea – a veiled reference to China in particular.

 

The US and Japan have led the way on so-called "secondary sanctions" that target third-country businesses that surreptitiously deal with North Korea in breach of the UN rules, including Chinese banks and companies.

 

But Australia has some autonomous sanctions of its own that target individuals in third countries including China, Taiwan and Vietnam.

 

The Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs official, in a briefing to Fairfax Media this week, said such secondary sanctions had to be tightened to "maximise pressure" on the regime of Kim Jong-un.

 

"It is very helpful," he said. "There is always some way to escape the sanction measures, so that's why autonomous measures by each country is important. For example, if a company of a third country violates the Security Council resolution, then we must freeze assets of those companies," he said.

 

The Australian measures were "very helpful in convincing other countries across the world that they must do the same", he said.

 

"They are always trying to find leeway in the sanctions. We must put an end to this."

 

Japan is a key player in the North Korean crisis because it is one of the countries most immediately in the firing line but also because of its tight security treaty with the US as well as Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's apparently close relationship with US President Donald Trump.

 

More...

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/japan-warns-of-last-chance-on-north-korea-with-calls-for-tighter-australian-sanctions-20170912-gyfv1a.html

 

 

Out of any country, Japan knows first hand what these weapons can do.

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300z    228

 

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300z    228

 

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Rippleman    2,670

Sanctions won't work, they will go around it. Words won't work, they will ignore it.

 

Only 2 things will change North Korea.

 

1) The REAL threat of regime change (which should trigger #2)

2) Regime direction change.

 

Although just my own opinion, I hope he continues on this stupid defiance show and is simply removed by China (china being forced to do so by not wanting USA/Japan/SK to remove him.)

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+ctebah    2,744
22 minutes ago, 300z said:

 

Heavily watered down sanctions due to Russian and Chinese interference.  Nevertheless, they will not accomplish anything.  The only way out of this is diplomacy but we already know that the US is not interested in sitting down as their favorite card is regime changes.  

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techbeck    4,965
4 hours ago, Rippleman said:

Sanctions won't work, they will go around it. Words won't work, they will ignore it.

 

Only 2 things will change North Korea.

 

1) The REAL threat of regime change (which should trigger #2)

2) Regime direction change.

 

Although just my own opinion, I hope he continues on this stupid defiance show and is simply removed by China (china being forced to do so by not wanting USA/Japan/SK to remove him.)

(Y)

 

Not sure what will happen since both sides are not interested in talking right now. China does have to power to do something tho

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+ctebah    2,744
16 minutes ago, techbeck said:

(Y)

 

Not sure what will happen since both sides are not interested in talking right now. 

Please stop spreading misinformation.  North Korea has signaled, on many occasions, that its willing to sit and negotiate.

 

And here's a question.  Since we know, for a fact, that last time North Korea negotiated an end to it's nuclear program, and got rid of it, the United States did not keep it's end of the bargain, why should we trust United States to negotiate again?

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techbeck    4,965

This is not just a US thing.  Several other countries are on NK about their actions as well.   And that is all I am blaming in your blame the US for everything game.   So, have fun....

 

And now back on topic...

 

Trump says tougher steps needed on North Korea after new U.N. sanctions

 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump said on Tuesday the U.N. sanctions on North Korea agreed this week were a small step and nothing compared to what would have to happen to deal with the country’s nuclear program.

 

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin warned China, North Korea’s main ally and trading partner, that if it did not follow through on the new measures, Washington would “put additional sanctions on them and prevent them from accessing the U.S. and international dollar system.”

 

Another senior administration official told Reuters any such “secondary sanctions” on Chinese banks and other companies were on hold for now to give time for China to show it was prepared to fully enforce the latest and previous rounds of sanctions.

 

The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously to boost sanctions on North Korea on Monday, banning its textile exports and capping fuel supplies, drawing from Pyongyang a threat of retaliation against the United States.

 

The U.N. action was triggered by North Korea’s sixth and largest nuclear test this month. It was the ninth Security Council sanctions resolution over North Korea’s ballistic missile and nuclear programs since 2006.

 

More...

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-northkorea-missiles/trump-says-tougher-steps-needed-on-north-korea-after-new-u-n-sanctions-idUSKCN1BL12S

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+ctebah    2,744
5 minutes ago, techbeck said:

This is not just a US thing.  Several other countries are on NK about their actions as well.   And that is all I am blaming in your blame the US for everything game.   So, have fun....

I never stated otherwise.  I simply pointed you spreading misinformation by saying that neither side is willing to negotiate when it's a fact that North Korea has signaled, on many occasions, that it's willing to negotiate.

 

And then I asked why would they want to negotiate, again, when last time the US and it's allies DID NOT hold up a single thing in their agreement. 

 

These are facts, like it or not.

 

Also, in regards to what Trump is saying nowadays.  This is him in 1999:

 

Quote

“I would negotiate like crazy and I’d make sure that we tried to get the best deal possible,” he added. “If a man walks up to you in the street…and puts a gun to your head and says, ‘Give me your money,’ wouldn’t you rather know where he’s coming from before he had the gun in his hand?”

Perhaps now some will realize that it's not really what Trump says/wants, but what the warmongers want.

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techbeck    4,965

People need to stop living 30 years ago.  Lots have changed since then.  Some for the good, some not.  If NK does not trust the US, then talking it worthless no matter who wanted it.  If NK wont trust the US, then them willing to talk is an empty statement.  Talking is doing jack.  Sanctions are doing jack and going to end up hurting the NK people more than they already are.  This will not be solved with either real action, or a 3rd party stepping in.  Hell, China seems ot have all the answers are real power here since NK trade is mostly with them. Why done they step in.  Instead....

 

Swiss ready to mediate in North Korea crisis

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-northkorea-missiles-swiss/swiss-ready-to-mediate-in-north-korea-crisis-idUSKCN1BF157?il=0

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+ctebah    2,744
3 minutes ago, techbeck said:

Talking is doing jack.

How?  Years ago when they negotiated, the world got everything it wanted from North Korea.  Instead, the North Korea got screwed.  

 

Negotiations can accomplish a lot if the parties hold up to their ends of the agreement.  Last time we know that North Korea held up their deal but they were failed by the United States and it's allies.

 

This entire situation would be diffused is the United States took all it's military from the Korean peninsula.  That's all it would take.  So, rather than spreading misinformation, maybe you should work on changing the way your government behaves?

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