Clonezilla failing on new systems with 7th generation Intel processors


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sks447

Hi guys, Clonezilla is failing to create an image of any laptop or desktop that has a new 7th generation Intel processor. Any ideas? It works on anything else I throw at it. It appears to be an issue with how the partitions are setup on these new systems. Thanks.

 

 

 

 

20170912_103847.jpg

Edited by sks447
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farmeunit

Not sure what the processor has to do with the partitions....

 

Only thing I see is this and it's related to graphics card, so appears different that your issue.

https://sourceforge.net/p/clonezilla/discussion/Clonezilla_live/thread/05295651/?limit=25

 

Have you tried fresh format and reinstall using one format.  GPT or MBR.

 

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sks447
1 minute ago, farmeunit said:

Not sure what the processor has to do with the partitions....

 

Only thing I see is this and it's related to graphics card, so appears different that your issue.

https://sourceforge.net/p/clonezilla/discussion/Clonezilla_live/thread/05295651/?limit=25

 

Have you tried fresh format and reinstall using one format.  GPT or MBR.

 

The part where I get the error is the very last step before it grabs the image. The user in the graphics thread wasn't even able to boot to clonezilla. The partition error just happens to only appear on systems with the newer processors. I have tried an newly formatted hard drive and the error is the same. Somehow Clonezilla reads MBR and GPT and it gets messed up. Very odd issue. Thanks for the reply.

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Unobscured Vision

I've seen that with UEFI's that were doing funky things with disk handling. I was left with more questions than answers. :no: 

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farmeunit

We disable UEFI and use Legacy boot for all our imaging right now.  I want to start using UEFI, but haven't had time to work on it.  If you disable Secure Boot and UEFI, what happens?

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sks447
8 hours ago, farmeunit said:

We disable UEFI and use Legacy boot for all our imaging right now.  I want to start using UEFI, but haven't had time to work on it.  If you disable Secure Boot and UEFI, what happens?

Same thing, you have to disable UEFI just to get into Clonezilla.

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goretsky

Hello,

 

Are you using the i686 or amd64 build of Clonezilla?

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

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sks447
20 hours ago, goretsky said:

Hello,

 

Are you using the i686 or amd64 build of Clonezilla?

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

Hi, I am using the i386/686 version.

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goretsky

Hello,

You might want to try using the amd64 version, as those 7th generation Intel processors and chipsets may be doing something that the compiler used to make those i386/686 builds does not like, at a guess.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

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sks447
7 hours ago, goretsky said:

Hello,

You might want to try using the amd64 version, as those 7th generation Intel processors and chipsets may be doing something that the compiler used to make those i386/686 builds does not like, at a guess.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

Great idea, i'll check it out. Thanks!

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sks447
On 9/20/2017 at 6:31 AM, sks447 said:

 

No luck with the AMD version. Its the dang partition issue.

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