SpaceX Mars presentation: IAC 2017


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DocM

A single thread to collect the info as it comes in.

 

Quote

This week at the International Astronautical Congress (IAC) in Adelaide, Australia, SpaceX CEO and Lead Designer Elon Musk will provide an update to his 2016 presentation regarding the long-term technical challenges that need to be solved to support the creation of a permanent, self-sustaining human presence on Mars.

 

Times

 

Thursday 2130 PDT
Friday 0030 EDT
Friday 0430 UTC
Friday 1400 ACST

 

Streaming

 

http://www.spacex.com/webcast
 

https://www.australiascience.tv/theme/iac-2017/

 

 

 

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DocM

"Finer" aspect ratio.
Same height, but 9m wide 
4 smaller legs
Winglets
Split main window
Engine bells more retracted
Crane in action 
(Tesla?) Space truck

They said smaller, but it ain't that small!

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Unobscured Vision

T-17:45. :yes: Got my snacks and I'm all cozied up.

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Unobscured Vision

Chill music. :woot:

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DocM

Somewhere,  James O'Hanlon and Robert A Heinlein have  meter wide grins.

 

(Screenwriters for Destination Moon)

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DocM

It'll replace Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy

1200s on Raptor

40s burns to date, limted by the tank

 

40s is what's needed for Mars

200 bar pressure, heading to 300

Land on launch mount 

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Unobscured Vision

He seems nervous. Dunno why, he's playing to a friendly audience. :D 

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Unobscured Vision

Ooooh, 31 Raptors. Hmm. 

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DocM

150t to LEO
9 meters
31 engines 
4500t vehicle 

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DocM

 

40 cabins

825 m3 volume, larger than A380

860t O2

240 CH4

4 RaptorVAC

2 S/L Raptors, only 1 needed

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Unobscured Vision

1,700kN ASL

 

1,900 kN VAC.

 

Now we've got official stats.

 

[EDIT] Wow, kinda lowballing the stats a bit, Elon? :o

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DocM

Tanker and ship mate tail to tail using launch attachments. Ullage thrusters transfer the props.

ALLIGATOR FAIRING ON THE CARGO SHIP!! HE IS A BOND VILLAIN!! 

 

Land and return from Moon without refueling.

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Unobscured Vision

2022!!!!

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DocM

Production of first ship starts in about nine months.

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Unobscured Vision

:yes: 

SUBORBITAL HOPS!!  :D:yes: 

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Unobscured Vision

Well, that was a ride, no pun intended.

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DocM

Jesus H. Christ, they actually start building that spaceship in Q2 of next year? OMG...

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FloatingFatMan
22 minutes ago, Unobscured Vision said:

2022!!!!

 

2 minutes ago, DocM said:

Jesus H. Christ, they actually start building that spaceship in Q2 of next year? OMG...

The space buff in me is cheering. The loud mouthed jerk cynic in me is saying "Yeah yeah, build it and we'll see."

 

 

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DocM

 Payload dispenser ship

post-10859-0-53311000-1506669535.jpg

post-10859-0-73583700-1506669720.jpg

 

Propellant transfer using ullage thrusters

 

post-10859-0-59154200-1506670228.jpg

 

post-10859-0-54497400-1506670266.jpg

 

post-10859-0-86945300-1506670308.jpg

 

post-10859-0-51999500-1506670363.jpg

 

post-10859-0-68479000-1506670405.jpg

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