Router/AP Set Up And Hardware

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Mindovermaster    987

My mother is building a new house for us. Every house we looked at didn't have everything. So a friend suggested to build our own. We do not have finals on the house's design, but we are very sure on a specific design. I do not know where the cables will go to, but the realtor said that It will be in every room. But we would not need this.

 

This is my assumption:

 

oX9WosS.jpg

 

Top left is going to be my bedroom. Bottom bedroom will be guest room and parent's computer room.

 

I'm thinking we need Ethernet connectors in both rooms. Ethernet in living room can easily power the two APs noted above. Cable Modem and Router can live in the basement.

 

I don't think I'll need a switch. I thought of getting into networking, but I'll stay away from that until I get a little more money and experience in networking. And I don't really need VLANS and whatever Budman has to say about that. :p Unless there is a good reason for one.

 

Right now, I have a cable Arris modem, connected to an ASUS RT-N66R, connected to computers, wired and wireless.

 

Edit: If I need to replace any of this, I will, but I want to keep this cheap, but not a POC...

 

Anything I didn't touch on base, let me know... (kinda a noob into this)

Edited by Mindovermaster

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Mindovermaster    987

24 hours, no reply?

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Buttus    981

they usually run cat-5 (or maybe even cat-6 now?) to every room of the house instead of telephone line, so every room should have a ethernet port.

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adrynalyne    8,570
3 minutes ago, Buttus said:

they usually run cat-5 (or maybe even cat-6 now?) to every room of the house instead of telephone line, so every room should have a ethernet port.

What you said doesn’t mean what you think it does. Even if they are using cat5 for phone, doesn’t mean every room will have an Ethernet port. You also don’t want to be sharing your Ethernet cable with phone. 

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theefool    5

Unless they are using VOIP, then they can share.

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sc302    1,456

ON the cheap???

 

Put your arris and router in place, see where your dead zones are and put ap's in the area...or get mesh.   No need for networking, just plug and play/follow the bouncing ball type of instructions.

https://allpowermoves.com/best-mesh-router/

 

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Mindovermaster    987

Maybe I forgot to add this. We bought our own modem awhile ago. Few years. Now since we updated to the phone/TV/Internet plan, we have a separate phone modem too. So, you still need telephone wire TO your phone. At least to the base.

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adrynalyne    8,570
35 minutes ago, theefool said:

Unless they are using VOIP, then they can share.

Builders don’t run cat5 as telephone for voip though. ;)

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Matthew S.    253
15 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

Maybe I forgot to add this. We bought our own modem awhile ago. Few years. Now since we updated to the phone/TV/Internet plan, we have a separate phone modem too. So, you still need telephone wire TO your phone. At least to the base.

Even if you have two cat 6 runs to each room, you could just patch that into the phone modem instead of a switch...

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Mindovermaster    987
1 minute ago, Matthew S. said:

Even if you have two cat 6 runs to each room, you could just patch that into the phone modem instead of a switch...

Well, the phone modem is not CAT 5/6. We get everything through our cable. I think it would be VOIP then.

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Matthew S.    253

RJ45 (Ethernet) jacks are backwards compatible with RJ11 (telephone)...

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sc302    1,456
Well, the phone modem is not CAT 5/6. We get everything through our cable. I think it would be VOIP then.

It could. But let me tell you a little secret about cat 5/6. You can use your phone over those lines. Instead of 2pair phone they are 4 pair. You get a reducer/converter and you can use those lines. Or you can run 2 pair. Or you can run your phone through Ethernet.

Rj45 to rj11
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Mindovermaster    987

 

6 minutes ago, sc302 said:


It could. But let me tell you a little secret about cat 5/6. You can use your phone over those lines. Instead of 2pair phone they are 4 pair. You get a reducer/converter and you can use those lines. Or you can run 2 pair. Or you can run your phone through Ethernet.

Rj45 to rj11

You have a link to said "conerter"? I never heard of this. Does it convert one way, or...

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sc302    1,456

google is your friend

 

Rj45 to rj11

 

 

https://www.neweggbusiness.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIV0KK6GZ2640&nm_mc=KNC-GoogleBizMKPL-PC&cm_mmc=KNC-GoogleBizMKPL-PC-_-pla-_-Telephony+Accessories-_-9SIV0KK6GZ2640&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI5aT4lrGK2AIVQVcNCh1h8wtgEAQYBSABEgKsmfD_BwE

 

https://www.amazon.com/URBEST-Female-Telephone-Ethernet-Adapter/dp/B00RX8I0PY

 

 

lots of different ways

 

search terms, just copy and paste into a google search

 

RJ45 Male to RJ11 female

RJ45 Female to RJ11 Male

 

RJ45 Male to RJ11 Male

 

 

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farmeunit    491

I would get a cheap switch with enough ports for each room, and then install a small punch-down block for the telephone lines, also.  Everything would run to one room, or in your basement.  Easy access for technicians, and if you swapping out equipment or changing companies.

 

I don't know about the converters, but even if you ran one RJ11 and one CAT6 to each room, it's MUCH easier and cheaper to do when building, versus having someone come in later and do it.

 

They do have "splitters" where you use one cable, but two ethernet jacks/ports, but I wouldn't tie a phone line into those.  It would be a minimal savings, though.

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Mindovermaster    987
48 minutes ago, sc302 said:

google is your friend

 

 

 

Rj45 to rj11

 

<snip>


Just want to make sure I'm getting the right thing, that's all. ;)

 

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Matthew S.    253

or you could just, you know, plug the rj11 directly into the rj45 keystone  :rolleyes:

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sc302    1,456
or you could just, you know, plug the rj11 directly into the rj45 keystone  [emoji57]

Yes but it is loose. Rj11 fits into rj12 jack but has connectivity issues in a rj45. It is too wide.  How do I know? I used to sell adapters to people like you who “know”, complaining that it either falls out or drops connections because it wiggles around.

 

 

Just because it fits in the hole doesn’t mean it makes a solid connection, if it makes a connection at all. Technically you only need the blue pair, pins 4&5. You could make an adapter yourself if you have the tools, ends, and cable.

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Matthew S.    253

never had an rj11 fall out of an rj45 (do it both at home and at work)

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sc302    1,456
never had an rj11 fall out of an rj45 (do it both at home and at work)

I guess the older clamshell type phones were more susceptible being that they usually weren’t mounted on a wall or really stationed on a desk. This goes back to the 90s.

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Matthew S.    253

it also depends if it's an "abused" cable (meaning the retention clip is missing/very loose) though I do know where you're coming from, the adaptor isn't really necessary though with a newish/good condition cables.

 

But there is a caveat, if you're constantly unplugging a rj11 from a rj45 jack you risk damaging the jack.

 

the rj11 cable pictured is actually the one that goes to my phone (oddly enough I used to have a metric ton of those damned cables, now I can't even find one that wasn't connected).

 

IMG_1575.thumb.jpg.60e2c05ad9d1d27b5f554bbcb4593e3a.jpg

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+goretsky    767

Hello,

 

One of the things I learned to regret was that when my home was being built (1997) I reduced the number of phone jacks for some minimal cost savings.  Cordless phones worked, of course, but usually didn't have the same audio quality as calls with a corded phone over POTS--at least with late 1990s/early 2000s cordless phone technology.  Even today, though, cell phone coverage is still quite poor in the neighborhood where my home is located, so it really would have been to my advantage to spend the extra money to get the cabling installed.  Perhaps the biggest advantage if I'd done this back then would be that today I could have used those phone lines to pull Ethernet cabling.

 

In any case, I would echo @Matthew S.'s suggestion for two Ethernet network cable runs, and even look at the cost of doing third-run for telco with RJ11, as POTS-line handsets are a lot less expensive than VoIP handsets, don't require you to run (and maintain) your own VoIP server to act as a PBX, etc.

 

What might be very interesting for you to do is get quotes for wiring up the house with single network cable, dual network cable, network and telco cable, just to see how much they cost.  If anything, I suspect that labor will be the largest cost, and the materials cost will not vary tremendously.  But, also speak to a realtor, and ask them how much value having the different cable runs adds to the home, because that is something which does add value.  I seem to recall that otherwise-identical homes in areas that have gigabit Internet service are worth $4,000 more, on average, than homes which don't have access to that service, so I'd imagine that having a home professionally wired up with an internal network would be worth something extra as well, especially since it costs a lot more to retrofit that stuff once the home is already built.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

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Matthew S.    253

That's basically why I'm re-wiring my parent's place, to add value, I don't even think the coax in the house is RG59 (house was built in '92) and we currently have vonage and can't use our house's telco lines due to them being hard-wired to the incoming line from bell (the bloody idiots didn't install a "main" jack...)

 

Our home entertainment center alone needs about 4+ drops (xbox, tv, receiver, and a few other devices).

 

Plus with this, I can relocate all my home network equipment from the 3rd floor to the basement which is something I want to do since we have coax running through the hall...

 

Tis just a pain planning it all out, have a feeling I may not even have enough cable for my runs... 

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adrynalyne    8,570
18 minutes ago, Matthew S. said:

That's basically why I'm re-wiring my parent's place, to add value, I don't even think the coax in the house is RG59 (house was built in '92) and we currently have vonage and can't use our house's telco lines due to them being hard-wired to the incoming line from bell (the bloody idiots didn't install a "main" jack...)

 

Our home entertainment center alone needs about 4+ drops (xbox, tv, receiver, and a few other devices).

 

Plus with this, I can relocate all my home network equipment from the 3rd floor to the basement which is something I want to do since we have coax running through the hall...

 

Tis just a pain planning it all out, have a feeling I may not even have enough cable for my runs... 

Wouldn’t it make more sense to have 1-2 drops and just use a switch if you need to expand out to multiple devices? Seems kinda crazy to have four+ drops just for an entertainment center. 

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+BudMan    2,997

Why would you not put an AP in every room - you should for sure be wired for it!!!  The new 802.11ad that will be 60ghz will require AP in pretty much in every room..

 

If your building a house it should be wired for networking..  Yes you should have drops in every room.  And you should have a MDF room... Where it all runs with patch panel..

 

And you should have runs to where it would best make sense to install the AP in the ceilings.  For when you do need them.. This is future proofing the house.. In a new construction it would be just plain wrong not to provide for full networking that can do 10ge..  So yeah you prob want to run cat 6A min if not 7... Shoot prob wouldn't be a bad idea to run the fiber along with the ethernet..  So you could do 40ge to rooms if needed.. 

 

The idea is not what your actually using now - shoot for that yeah you want simple just get some mesh setup where you put the little satellites where you want on table, etc.  Or just use https://www.plumewifi.com/

On 12/13/2017 at 1:24 PM, Mindovermaster said:

(kinda a noob into this)

So you shouldn't be doing any of it really - hire a professional to design how your new house should be wired to future proof it...

 

In places like your living room prob makes sense to have multiple drops like power outlets - never know where someone would put their AV cab, TV, etc. And want a drop..

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