Which Linux distribution do you prefer? (2018 Edition)


Which Linux distribution do you prefer?  

115 members have voted

You do not have permission to vote in this poll, or see the poll results. Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

Recommended Posts

Andrew

The 2018 Linux distro opinion poll, awaiting your response.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Max Norris

Arch, just because I want it my way. Would rather build up my own thing than tear down somebody else's idea of what I should have. KDE Neon would be my second pick.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
cork1958

I use Lubuntu partly because I have a couple old machines and partly because it's a quite a basic and simple install that works amazingly fast on ANY machine! Have always liked basic and simple!!

 

Use Debian on occasion also.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
300z

I have tried many distros over the years but always keep coming back to Ubuntu, because it has always worked perfectly out of the box and I like to keep things simple, however I quite liked Mageia and OpenSUSE. I know it's not Linux but I installed PC-BSD on a old Acer laptop about 2 years ago and everything worked really well too, now it's called TrueOS, if I built a new and modern system I think this is what I would go with now.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Mindovermaster

I use Mint atm. But I might move to Manjaro soon...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
patseguin

I haven't messed with Linux in years, but I used to use Gentoo. Loved the idea of building a completely custom kernel tailored to my needs.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Mindovermaster
2 minutes ago, patseguin said:

I haven't messed with Linux in years, but I used to use Gentoo. Loved the idea of building a completely custom kernel tailored to my needs.

Can do that with Arch, too, mate...

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
adrynalyne

I’ve tried quite a few and while I don’t particularly care for Ubuntu, it’s one of the most supported distros out there which becomes a big deal if you want to compile Android. For instance, Solus is pretty awesome, but try collecting all the items you need for an AOSP build environment. I don’t have that kind of patience. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
markjensen

Still use Xubuntu, but with full Ubuntu Gnome experience, and my long-time favorite Fluxbox window manager as my primary desktop.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Barney T.
3 hours ago, markjensen said:

Still use Xubuntu, but with full Ubuntu Gnome experience, and my long-time favorite Fluxbox window manager as my primary desktop.

I do the same, Mark. Xubuntu is sleek, fast, and stable. That is my primary OS now.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Haggis
On 30/12/2017 at 3:03 PM, Mindovermaster said:

I use Mint atm. But I might move to Manjaro soon...

why the change?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Mindovermaster
58 minutes ago, Haggis said:

why the change?

Pacman/Aur had better software available than debian/ubuntu/mint had. Dunno why I ever moved back to Mint. Simplicity, I guess.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
DevTech

Whatever is supported well for Hyper-V and .NET Core which usually comes down to Ubuntu and CentOS/RHEL - Ubuntu probably has a few extra integration hooks out of the box into Windows 10 and of course Ubuntu code is buried in every Windows 10.

 

Supported Ubuntu virtual machines on Hyper-V:

 

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/virtualization/hyper-v/supported-ubuntu-virtual-machines-on-hyper-v

 

Supported CentOS and Red Hat Enterprise Linux virtual machines on Hyper-V:

 

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/virtualization/hyper-v/supported-centos-and-red-hat-enterprise-linux-virtual-machines-on-hyper-v

 

Best Practices for running Linux on Hyper-V:

 

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/virtualization/hyper-v/best-practices-for-running-linux-on-hyper-v

 

With Hyper-V you can let Windows 10 have all the latest drivers for stuff and pass through what you need to your Linux running at Hypervisor speed.

 

A little know fact is that when you turn on Hyper-V in Windows 10 Pro, It converts your Windows 10 into a VM running under the Hyper-V Hypervisor in such a transparent manner that you don't know it's happening.

 

So at that point, running Linux is just another VM and running it native probably provides no advantages and switching distros is no big decision since you can have all of the possible candiates running at the same time!

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
giantsnyy

I picked "Other" because it doesn't exactly fit under OpenSUSE, but I prefer to use SuSE Linux Enterprise Server.  I have Ubuntu Server 17.10 on a VM to use as my UniFi controller - and I absolutely hate it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Mindovermaster
1 hour ago, DevTech said:

So at that point, running Linux is just another VM and running it native probably provides no advantages and switching distros is no big decision since you can have all of the possible candiates running at the same time!

 

 

 

Yeah, then Windows 10 Blue Screens. OH NOES!!!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
adrynalyne
7 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

Yeah, then Windows 10 Blue Screens. OH NOES!!!

...sure? That’s happened to me once in the last year and a half. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Mindovermaster
10 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

...sure? That’s happened to me once in the last year and a half. 

I've heard enough horror stories about Windows 10. All over FB. See either a BSOD or a sigm saying "please wait while..." for updates, for system, blah...

 

I should've added a /s or /r, but I guess no one caught that...

Link to post
Share on other sites
adrynalyne
11 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

I've heard enough horror stories about Windows 10. All over FB. See either a BSOD or a sigm saying "please wait while..." for updates, for system, blah...

 

I should've added a /s or /r, but I guess no one caught that...

Because the same type of people making those posts are not running Linux, likely because they don't know how. Otherwise it would be replaced with [insert horror story from insert OS]. You always hear the most horror stories from the most common OS.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
DevTech
6 hours ago, Mindovermaster said:

Yeah, then Windows 10 Blue Screens. OH NOES!!!

That is not a modern assessment of anything and seems odd in 2018 to see old fashioned "FUD" like that.

 

The vast majority of Windows Blue Screens were due to device drivers coded by thousands of 3rd party companies to support the vast array of available hardware on Windows. It is amazing that Microsoft has been able to manage this situation into a very rare event.

 

Has anyone here seen a Windows 10 Blue Screen lately?

 

The convenience of running multiple Linux and Windows VMs on an incredibility efficient and powerful Hypervisor produces a platform that drives the progress of both Windows and Linux simultaneously. The cross-pollination between the two O/S constantly increases. For example, a major convergence of the Windows and Linux networking stack to permit the embedding of Docker and Kubernetes support into Windows, Linux and MacOS...

 

http://blog.kubernetes.io/2017/09/windows-networking-at-parity-with-linux.html

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
+InsaneNutter

Ubuntu is my choice, its well supported and plays nice with both Esxi and Hyper-V.

 

Usually if I have an issue, someone else has already had that same issue so a resolution can be found quickly.

 

My main experiences comes from using Ubuntu Server for various projects, not so much from a desktop point of view.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Haggis
23 hours ago, Mindovermaster said:

Pacman/Aur had better software available than debian/ubuntu/mint had. Dunno why I ever moved back to Mint. Simplicity, I guess.

had a play with it in Vbox, seems decent

Link to post
Share on other sites
fusi0n

I've ditched Ubuntu and have moved on to Fedora. Not sure what I didn't do this a long time ago TBH..

Link to post
Share on other sites
Brandon H

I'm back to using Fedora on my laptop since they've switched to full Wayland and ditched X11 finally

Link to post
Share on other sites
Brandon H
On 12/30/2017 at 9:03 AM, Mindovermaster said:

I use Mint atm. But I might move to Manjaro soon...

been using Manjaro for the past couple years and love it but switched back to Fedora for now for the Wayland support. Will probably switch back to Manjaro once XFCE starts supporting Wayland

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Nick H. unpinned this topic
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Usama Jawad96
      Microsoft Threat and Vulnerability Management now supports Linux
      by Usama Jawad

      Microsoft's Threat and Vulnerability Management (TVM) suite allows organizations to improve security configurations of their devices. It offers insights to discover threats, automatically prioritizes issues, and allows companies to remediate vulnerabilities seamlessly. Previously, these capabilities were only available on Windows and macOS, but Microsoft has now extended support to Linux as well.

      Currently supported Linux operating systems include RHEL, CentOS, and Ubuntu. Support will be rolling out for Oracle Linux, SUSE, and Debian soon as well.

      TVM capabilities can be directly managed from Microsoft Defender for Endpoint. Furthermore, its APIs can be called to get access to the underlying dataset which includes vulnerability assessments and software inventory, among other things. This also means that security partners can utilize these APIs to get access to this data and build their own custom solutions.

      Microsoft went on to say that:

      Apart from general availability of TVM for Linux, the secure configuration assessment component is now also in public preview for macOS and Linux. It was only available on Windows and Windows Server devices previously. You can find out more about it here.

      In terms of next steps, Microsoft says that it plans to improve the interoperability of its TVM solution by partnering with other integration and solution providers. Additionally, support for TVM on Android and iOS is also expected "later this summer", although we don't have a firm release date as of yet.

    • By News Staff
      Pay What You Want for this Complete Linux eBook Bundle
      by Steven Parker



      Today's highlighted offer comes via our Online Courses section of the Neowin Deals store, where for a limited time you can Pay What You Want for the Complete Linux eBook Bundle. The 4-book guide to programming more powerfully and efficiently with Linux.

      With the Pay What You Want bundles, you can get something incredible for as little as you want to pay. And if you beat the average price, you’ll receive the fully upgraded bundle! Included in this Pay What You Want deal, are the following courses:

      Unlock the following eBooks with a bid over the average price:

      Mastering Linux Security & Hardening
      A Comprehensive Guide to Preventing Your Linux System From Getting Compromised

      Linux Shell Scripting Cookbook, Third Edition
      Do Amazing Things with the Linux Shell

      Mastering Linux Shell Scripting, Second Edition
      Master the Complexities of Bash Shell Scripting

      or Pay What You Want for the unlocked eBook:

      Mastering Embedded Linux Programming, Second Edition
      Master the Techniques Needed to Build Great, Efficient Embedded Devices On Linux

      What's the benefit:
      The bundle represents an overall retail value of $160. Bid the average price or over and you'll take home the entire bundle. Beat the Leader's price and get entered into the epic giveaway! Pay What You Want for this Complete Linux eBook Bundle
      Not for you?
      That's OK, there are other deals on offer you can check out here.

      Enter giveaways: Polycade Home Arcade | $5K in cash | $10K in Crypto Ivacy VPN - 5 year subscription for just $1 per month NordVPN - 2 year subscription at up to 68% off Private Internet Access VPN - subscriptions at up to 71% off Unlocator VPN or SmartDNS - unblock Geoblock with 7-day free trial Neowin Store for our preferred partners. Subscribe to Neowin - for $14 a year, or $28 a year for Ad-Free experience Neowin Deals · Free eBooks · Neowin Store

      Disclosure: This is a StackCommerce deal or giveaway in partnership with Neowin; an account at StackCommerce is required to participate in any deals or giveaways. For a full description of StackCommerce's privacy guidelines, go here. Neowin benefits from shared revenue of each sale made through our branded deals site, and it all goes toward the running costs.

    • By Sszecret
      Microsoft Weekly: Edge Beta for Linux, a new Segoe font, and games galore
      by Florin Bodnarescu



      A number of things happened in the last seven days, including the arrival of Edge Beta on Linux, the unveiling of a new Segoe font variant, and even a refresh of the Azure logo. You can find info about that, as well as much more below, in your Microsoft digest for the week of May 2 - 8.

      Edge Beta for Linux


      We should begin with a little info regarding Edge, as not much has happened with the browser this week.

      For starters, build 92.0.878.0 made its way to the Dev Channel. While this would normally be pretty exciting, Microsoft says the build doesn’t change much, given that it came out just a few days after the previous build. The changes are so minor that the company didn’t even bother publishing its usual post about it.

      Moving on to the stable version, namely version 90, folks may be experiencing problems with YouTube playback, namely crashing. This bug has been acknowledged by a Microsoft engineer, who suggested users disable hardware acceleration as a workaround. The same engineer confirmed that the company is working on a fix, but that the issue may be more significant than initially thought.

      And since we’re taking a tour through the various Insider channels, it’s worth pointing out that over six months after the Dev channel availability of Edge for Linux, there is now a Beta variant for the open-source OS.

      Lastly, Microsoft is now testing everse image search in the Bing sidebar. This does pretty much exactly what it sounds like it would, namely allows you to right-click on an image and search for it on Bing in the sidebar which appears on the right of the Edge browser. As per Reddit user Leopeva64-2 who stumbled upon this, the capability is available in Edge Dev, though we have not seen this on any of our test devices.

      A new font


      For Insiders in the Dev channel, Microsoft pushed out yet another preview build, 21376, which included the usual array of fixes and, rather interestingly a new Segoe font variant.

      While Segoe UI itself has been used as a default system font going all the way back to Windows Vista, a number of variants have been revealed since, including Segoe Script, Segoe Pro, and what Microsoft used for its Modern design icons, Segoe MDL2 Assets.

      The new font is called Segoe UI Variable and as the name implies, it’s meant to vary slightly depending on the use case. Segoe UI itself for example was originally designed to be optimal at 9pt sizes, while Segoe UI Variable tweaks the letter weight and tracking depending on the size.

      For smaller text, the letters are more tightly tracked, have more weight and are more open, while at display size, text isn’t quite as tightly tracked and has amplified letter terminals. For those not familiar, tracking refers to the overall horizontal spacing between font characters. This is not to be confused with kerning, which refers to the proportional spacing between two individual letters, whereas tracking refers to, say, an entire word.

      On the subject of change, we should touch on the fact that Microsoft is set to fully remove Flash from Windows 10 in July. While support for Flash was dropped by Adobe on December 31, 2020, and Microsoft released a manual update to remove it back in October of the same year, it was, as the name implies, not necessarily mandatory. Starting in July, the Redmond giant is set to push out the update to Windows 10 v1809 and above, automagically removing the media plugin.

      To that end, the firm is also removing any update blocks for versions 2004 and 20H2 (May 2020 Update, October 2020 Update), allowing folks to freely upgrade to these supported variants. We’re on the verge of a new feature update anyway, so it’s not much of a surprise that Microsoft wants folks on the latest Windows 10 version, if possible.

      Last but not least, to the dismay of perhaps three people, Windows 10X is allegedly delayed indefinitely, as Microsoft focuses on Windows 10 proper.

      Since its original unveil at the end of 2019 with the dual-screen Surface Neo and Duo, the former device was delayed out of its Holiday 2020 release window, and Windows 10X was repurposed for single-screen devices - in stark contrast to its initial 'dual-screen devices first' approach. For now, it seems that the Redmond firm is putting 10X on the backburner, focusing its resources on the expected Sun Valley UI refresh coming to Windows 10 later this year.

      Games galore


      In a rather surprising announcement, Microsoft decided to take the wraps off a sizeable selection of titles now supporting FPS Boost. More than quadrupling the number of supported games from 23 to 97, the latest additions include Dying Light, a number of LEGO games, ReCore, and more, with supported framerates from 60 to 120FPS.

      There are good news on the Game Pass front as well, with FIFA 21, Red Dead Online, Psychonauts, Outlast 2 and many others either already available or joining the subscription very soon. Additionally, folks in the U.S. also get four months of Spotify Premium with Game Pass Ultimate, though this is available for new users only.

      On the revenue share front, Microsoft dropped its cut from 30% to 12% on PC, and was planning to do the same on console, but it will no longer do so. An interesting tidbit about the company’s strategy relates to exactly why it lowered its split. As per the court documents filed in January, this is done “in exchange for the grant of streaming rights to Microsoft.”, in other words, xCloud. It’s not exactly clear whether the proposal was far enough along to even be discussed with console publishers, but for the time being, the revenue split on Xbox remains 30/70.

      If you don’t think that’s such a great deal, maybe some of the Deals with Gold will pique your interest, like the discounts for Borderlands 3, Control, PAYDAY 2: Crimewave Edition, and others.

      However, if you have no desire to buy more games and already own the latest iteration of Flight Simulator or the spin-off title Minecraft Dungeons, it’s worth checking for updates, as both first-party games have received a number of enhancements and fixes.

      Dev channel
      The latest monthly Office Insider build on the Mac has added the ‘Share to Teams’ capability in Outlook, and more. Microsoft has announced its automation tool for security testing AI systems, dubbed Counterfit. Live transcriptions will soon be added for unscheduled and channel meetings in Teams. Microsoft has announced Reading Progress for Teams for education. Whiteboard now has improved Teams integration, support for rich content like images and stickers, and more. The Redmond giant has detailed more education features coming through August. Excel on the web now supports Power BI-connected PivotTables. Microsoft has delivered oxygen, ventilators, and more to support India’s COVID-19 response. New customization options are now available for Reply-all Storm Protection in Microsoft 365. Microsoft customers in the EU will be able to store all their data in the region by 2022. The Redmond firm has warned of a widespread gift card scam targeting organizations. Logging off
      We end the week with a refreshed Azure logo, an interesting Defender bug, and some Surface firmware updates.



      Starting with Azure, Microsoft has decided that the logo for its cloud service needed a bit of a Fluent Design facelift, and as such unveiled a brand-new icon. Ditching the angular shape of the old logo, this one is much more reminiscent of say, the Visual Studio icon, though in some cases, it may remind folks of the Adobe or Autodesk logos.

      On the flip side, what wasn’t needed was a rather weird Microsoft Defender bug, which ended up creating “thousands” of files in users' boot drives. Some folks saw small files less than 2KB in size, while other users reported multiple GBs of storage being eaten up. A fix is already rolling out, and if you’re on Microsoft Defender engine version 1.1.18100.5, you’ll be bumped up to 1.1.18100.6 following this update.

      Finally, for owners of the Surface Pro 4, Studio, Laptop 1,2, and 4, Microsoft has released a slew of firmware updates meant to bring stability and security enhancements.

      Missed any of the previous columns? Be sure to have a look right here.



      If you’d like to get a daily digest of news from Neowin, we now have a Newsletter you can sign up to either via the ‘Get our newsletter’ widget in the sidebar, or this link.

    • By News Staff
      Learn Linux Quickly eBook ($27.99 Value) - free download
      by Steven Parker

      Learn over 116 Linux commands to develop the skills you need to become a professional Linux system administrator. Claim your complimentary eBook (worth $27.99) for free, before the offer expires on May 12.



      Linux is one of the most sought-after skills in the IT industry, with jobs involving Linux being increasingly in demand. Linux is by far the most popular operating system deployed in both public and private clouds; it is the processing power behind the majority of IoT and embedded devices. Do you use a mobile device that runs on Android? Even Android is a Linux distribution.



      This Linux book is a practical guide that lets you explore the power of the Linux command-line interface. Starting with the history of Linux, you'll quickly progress to the Linux filesystem hierarchy and learn a variety of basic Linux commands. You'll then understand how to make use of the extensive Linux documentation and help tools. The book shows you how to manage users and groups and takes you through the process of installing and managing software on Linux systems.

      As you advance, you'll discover how you can interact with Linux processes and troubleshoot network problems before learning the art of writing bash scripts and automating administrative tasks with Cron jobs. In addition to this, you'll get to create your own Linux commands and analyze various disk management techniques.

      By the end of this book, you'll have gained the Linux skills required to become an efficient Linux system administrator and be able to manage and work productively on Linux systems.

      This free offer expires tomorrow, on May 12.

      How to get it
      Please ensure you read the terms and conditions to claim this offer. Complete and verifiable information is required in order to receive this free offer. If you have previously made use of these free offers, you will not need to re-register. While supplies last!

      Learn Linux Quickly ($27.99 Value) - free download
      Offered by Packt Publishing, view their other free resources. Expires May 12.

      Not for you?
      That's OK, there are other free eBooks on offer you can check out here.



      Enter giveaways: Polycade Home Arcade | $5K in cash | $10K in Crypto Ivacy VPN - 5 year subscription for just $1 per month NordVPN - 2 year subscription at up to 68% off Private Internet Access VPN - subscriptions at up to 71% off Unlocator VPN or SmartDNS - unblock Geoblock with 7-day free trial Neowin Store for our preferred partners. Subscribe to Neowin - for $14 a year, or $28 a year for Ad-Free experience Disable Sponsored posts · Neowin Deals · Free eBooks · Neowin Store

      Disclosure: A valid email address is required to fulfill your request. Complete and verifiable information is required in order to receive this offer. By submitting a request, your information is subject to TradePub.com's Privacy Policy.

    • By Usama Jawad96
      Here is Linux Advisory Board's ruling on University of Minnesota's "hypocrite commits"
      by Usama Jawad

      A couple of weeks ago, we reported that Greg Kroah-Hartman from the Linux kernel development and maintenance team had banned submissions from the University of Minnesota (UMN) due to some questionable patches that they submitted. The issue received a lot of public attention particularly due to the email exchanges between Hartman and the student researchers being made public. The latter argued that the patches come in the form of "a new static analyzer", but Hartman took issue with the fact that the clearly incorrect patches had been submitted to the kernel without any warning.

      After much back and forth, the department heads for Computer Science at UMN stated that they would investigate the matter further, and soon after, the student researchers published an apology giving more context to their dubious efforts.

      Now, the Linux Technical Advisory Board (TAB) has published its own findings of the matter and its recommendations for the future.



      In its detailed audit, the Linux TAB has described the entire timeline of events from the time when "one member of the UMN community" began a research project in August 2020 to intentionally introduce flaws in the Linux kernel with fake identities. A research paper on this endeavor was published in November 2020 after which no patches were submitted. Questionable submissions began again in April 2021 which is when Hartman confronted the researchers and eventually banned them from contributing in the future.

      Linux TAB has concluded that the researchers broke several documented rules including submitting patches with false identities. Five of these changes were publicly admitted to being invalid by the researchers in their paper, but the TAB has noted that all incorrect changes were caught or ignored by developers and maintainers, which means that its review process works correctly.

      435 commits from the UMN were reviewed in total. A summary of findings can be seen below:

      Commits found to be correct: 349 Commits found to be incorrect and in need of fixing: 39 Commits already fixed by later commits: 25 Commits that no longer matter: 12 Commits made before the research group existed: 9 Commits the author asked to have removed: 1 In light of the above, the Linux TAB has recommended that moving forward, UMN must improve the quality of its patches. It has also indicated that it will work with researchers to document best practices for contribution to open source projects, including the Linux kernel. It has suggested that the UMN set up its own internal review team, which should consist of at least one experienced developer who validates changes before they are submitted to the kernel. The Linux TAB has cautioned that:

      The Linux TAB has emphasized that the research community and kernel developers and maintainers can work in harmony, as they have done so in the past, but the goal of the community should be to create a robust kernel for production use. If efforts like this benefit only the research community, then conflicts such as this can arise, but they can be avoided if the recommendations of the Linux TAB are followed. You can read the letter in detail here.