Which Linux distribution do you prefer? (2018 Edition)


Which Linux distribution do you prefer?  

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Mindovermaster
4 minutes ago, Brandon H said:

been using Manjaro for the past couple years and love it but switched back to Fedora for now for the Wayland support. Will probably switch back to Manjaro once XFCE starts supporting Wayland

What desktops are supporting Wayland?

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Brandon H
2 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

What desktops are supporting Wayland?

straight Gnome seems to be the only desktop-environment to support it so far. all the others say support is 'in the works'

 

XFCE for example is primarily waiting for GTK3 wayland support I believe

 

Fedora is the first distro to actually enable wayland by default on the Gnome desktop as well (in fact the base fedora install doesn't have xorg installed anymore which is why i went fedora)

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  • 1 month later...
Vince800

Slackware, always Slackware. It's just about the only distro, in fact OS which doesn't interfere with anything I ask it to do. I have Raspbian on the Pi though.

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Killer_Z

Slackware with Alien's KDE 5 and the slackbuilds source repository is still the best for me at work.

The only problem is that on my new i7-8550U I'm forced to use the "-current" build; the 14.2 is a little old now. I really can't wait for the release of the 15.0.

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  • 3 weeks later...
nabz0r

Vote = Arch (Gnome)

At my last job, I've used Arch full time on my work Lenovo X1 Carbon and I was very happy. I am thinking of installing Arch on my new PC but to be honest, I can't be bothered going through the installation again. I think I'll install CentOS 7 and give it a try.

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Mindovermaster
4 minutes ago, nabz0r said:

Vote = Arch (Gnome)

At my last job, I've used Arch full time on my work Lenovo X1 Carbon and I was very happy. I am thinking of installing Arch on my new PC but to be honest, I can't be bothered going through the installation again. I think I'll install CentOS 7 and give it a try.

Well, either CentOS or Debian will be your best bet. :)

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nabz0r
1 minute ago, Mindovermaster said:

Well, either CentOS or Debian will be your best bet. :)

Why not? I can't find more stable than CentOS and their latest version seems to be OK imho.

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Mindovermaster
Just now, nabz0r said:

Why not? I can't find more stable than CentOS and their latest version seems to be OK imho.

CentOS is based off Debian...

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nabz0r
1 minute ago, Mindovermaster said:

CentOS is based off Debian...

No it's not. It's based on RedHat

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satukoro

Debian has been my favorite for years, but after using ElementaryOS for a little while, that might change.

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Mindovermaster
4 minutes ago, nabz0r said:

No it's not. It's based on RedHat

Oh, I was thinking of something else. Ignore me. :shiftyninja:

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nabz0r
3 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

Oh, I was thinking of something else. Ignore me. :shiftyninja:

Hehe :D

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firey

I don't use either for desktop OS but run both Ubuntu and Debian on Digital Ocean for servers. 

Ubuntu for .NET Core 2.0/MSSQL Server
Debian for LAMP Stack

 

Debian is usually my Go-To distro.

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Vince800
21 hours ago, nabz0r said:

Vote = Arch (Gnome)

At my last job, I've used Arch full time on my work Lenovo X1 Carbon and I was very happy. I am thinking of installing Arch on my new PC but to be honest, I can't be bothered going through the installation again. I think I'll install CentOS 7 and give it a try.

You'd probably be better off with something like Fedora or openSUSE Tumbleweed if you're used to the cutting edge software in Arch. CentOS is nowhere near cutting edge as it's a stable OS intended primarily for workstations or servers.

 

CentOS as you probably know is binary compatible with Red Hat which in turn is based on Fedora. OpenSUSE is it's own thing despite dealing with .rpm packages.

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nabz0r
1 hour ago, Vince800 said:

CentOS is nowhere near cutting edge as it's a stable OS intended primarily for workstations or servers.

 

And that is the main reason that I want to try it out with either i3 or suckless wm. I actually never liked either Fedora nor openSUSE and Arch is GREAT but as I mentioned I don't wanna go through the installation again, too lazy tbh.

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Mindovermaster
23 minutes ago, nabz0r said:

And that is the main reason that I want to try it out with either i3 or suckless wm. I actually never liked either Fedora nor openSUSE and Arch is GREAT but as I mentioned I don't wanna go through the installation again, too lazy tbh.

Always can use Antegros or ArchBang...

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+xrobwx71

Parrot

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Mindovermaster
47 minutes ago, xrobwx said:

Parrot

Polly want a cracker?

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Gerowen

My home server is still running Debian, the same thing it has been running for several years now.  I install software updates monthly and upgrade it in place whenever there's a new release.  I recently upgraded a few components in it like the RAM, CPU, put it all in a better case, etc. and when I migrated some data from our old 3TB drives to the 12TB replacement, the 3TB drives had THOUSANDS of hours of run-time, it's wild how fast that racks up, :p

Edited by Gerowen
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Mando

Mint here, decided it had been too long since i dabbled with linux, so converted laptop entirely.

 

18.3 is pretty slick, running like brown stuff of a shovel on the old X201.

 

i7 M620 ULV

8Gb DDR3

256gb Evo 850

 

 

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  • 3 months later...
linettereed

Ubuntu will be my first option for being simple to use and easiness, after that I would go with Fedora just for the reason that it can be used as portable one and easy to use.

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  • 1 month later...
Q-truth

I tried Mint 19 and I had a difficult time trying to use the cinnamon interface. but I'm back on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. I have come to realize that Ubuntu has several different systems

Gnome, Xfce, Cinnamon and Unity. I am aware of being able to install Mints cinnamon on this Ubuntu install but I like to keep things simple.

 

just for a little humor:

giphy.gif

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LaP
3 minutes ago, Q-truth said:

I tried Mint 19 and I had a difficult time trying to use the cinnamon interface. but I'm back on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. I have come to realize that Ubuntu has several different systems

Gnome, Xfce, Cinnamon and Unity. I am aware of being able to install Mints cinnamon on this Ubuntu install but I like to keep things simple.

 

just for a little humor:

giphy.gif

I personally like Unity on my 720p laptop. I have both Windows 10 and Ubuntu installed on it and lately i've been using Ubuntu (Unity) more than Windows 10. I think it looks and works nice at lower resolution.

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Mindovermaster
4 minutes ago, LaP said:

I personally like Unity on my 720p laptop. I have both Windows 10 and Ubuntu installed on it and lately i've been using Ubuntu (Unity) more than Windows 10. I think it looks and works nice at lower resolution.

You must be using an earlier version of Ubuntu, because Unity went the way of the dodo...

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LaP
5 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

You must be using an earlier version of Ubuntu, because Unity went the way of the dodo...

Really? I thought it was running unity. Anyway it looks like Unity probably just a theme? I don't know much about desktop Linux lol i installed it and it runs that's as far as i know Linux outside of servers (terminal).

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