Which Linux distribution do you prefer? (2018 Edition)


Which Linux distribution do you prefer?  

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Mindovermaster
2 minutes ago, LaP said:

Really? I thought it was running unity. Anyway it looks like Unity probably just a theme? I don't know much about desktop Linux lol i installed it and it runs that's as far as i know Linux outside of servers (terminal).

Well 18.04 doesn't come with Unity. Might get that mixed up with GNOME which is very similar, in ways.

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  • 1 month later...
Denis W.

For something to use in a VM, Lubuntu is least likely (amongst the *buntu derivatives) to drive me nuts with its UI. Simple and no nonsense.

 

For server use, it's primarily Ubuntu 16.04 and 18.04. For my personal server, it's a Debian derivative (Raspbian Lite).

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Mindovermaster
36 minutes ago, Denis W. said:

For something to use in a VM, Lubuntu is least likely (amongst the *buntu derivatives) to drive me nuts with its UI. Simple and no nonsense.

 

For server use, it's primarily Ubuntu 16.04 and 18.04. For my personal server, it's a Debian derivative (Raspbian Lite).

Ever use OpenBox? That's about as hosed down as you can go without terminal.

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Gerowen

Recently moved my primary PC back to Debian, like my server.  I ran Windows 10 on it for a long time and gamed on it, but I've been using it for more work related tasks and doing more gaming on my Nintendo Switch because, with my bad knee it can be painful to sit at a desk for any period of time and it's easier to sit on the couch and game while I let my PC render videos or whatever.

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Denis W.
On 10/2/2018 at 9:57 PM, Mindovermaster said:

Ever use OpenBox? That's about as hosed down as you can go without terminal.

Seeing Lubuntu uses LXDE which in turn uses Openbox, technically yes :p

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tiagosilva29

Relationship Status: It's complicated

 

Currently using Debian, but sometimes I flirt with antiX

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cork1958

Have Lubuntu 18.04.01 on most of my machines (6), but also have Linux Mint 19 on one. Really like the Mint though.

 

Have Lubuntu because I like the simple and less bloated stuff! :)

 

Edit: I knew I had voted on this before, but the option to vote showed up so figured I hadn't and I couldn't even see the number of pages in this topic until after I replied this time! Only thing different between this post and first one is the part about using Mint instead of Debian.

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Mindovermaster
14 minutes ago, cork1958 said:

Have Lubuntu 18.04.01 on most of my machines (6), but also have Linux Mint 19 on one. Really like the Mint though.

 

Have Lubuntu because I like the simple and less bloated stuff! :)

 

Edit: I knew I had voted on this before, but the option to vote showed up so figured I hadn't and I couldn't even see the number of pages in this topic until after I replied this time! Only thing different between this post and first one is the part about using Mint instead of Debian.

Andrew swipes this thread every year. So you could have just voted last year. ;)

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cork1958
40 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

Andrew swipes this thread every year. So you could have just voted last year. ;)

Darn Andrew!! 🤣

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bfoos

Other... Antergos (KDE Plasma) for me. Pacman with AUR is quite nice. I'd been wanting to get away from Ubuntu for some time and in fact I did stop using Ubuntu -and consequently Linux entirely when they switched to Unity- and try something new. Arch Linux has always intrigued me but setting it up seemed a daunting idea to me. Antergos solves that. While their graphical installer (Cnchi) can be buggy and downright temperamental at times, when it works it greatly eases the process of getting an Arch based system up and running. I've been back amongst the land of Linux for about a week now and Antergos has really breathed new life into my ageing HP DV7 1130US.

 

Incidentally, I believe it has been over 10 years since last I posted on Neowin and I hope at least that breaking my silence has added a little value to this thread.

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Matthew S.

I'm currently rolling my own LFS/BLFS distro at the moment.

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