Intel / AMD & AMD / NVIDIA


Intel / AMD & AMD / NVIDIA  

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LaP
On 8/7/2018 at 10:03 PM, LostCat said:

Freesync basically just requires an upgraded scaler from the usual makers, where G-Sync requires a custom hardware module from NV in there.  

 

So making a mon with G-Sync costs more to begin with, the market for it is lower and they have to recover R&D and make money off it in general (otherwise why even bother releasing it.)

 

Personally I have two Freesync mons and a laptop that uses Freesync, alongside the Xbox One X of course.  I don't currently have a desktop GPU or TV that use it, though I definitely plan to get both at some point.

I just upgraded my gtx 1070 to a Radeon 5700XT and imo it was worth it. Freesync is very cool. I would say it's definitely better than vsync. Smoother and no input lag at all. You get used to it fast but i would probably not go back to vsync.

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+LostCat
4 minutes ago, LaP said:

I just upgraded my gtx 1070 to a Radeon 5700XT and imo it was worth it. Freesync is very cool. I would say it's definitely better than vsync. Smoother and no input lag at all. You get used to it fast but i would probably not go back to vsync.

Well, they both support Freesync for a while now, but the 5700s are a huge upgrade :)  Nice.  I did the same.

 

(HDR handling seems a little iffy at times right now on the 5700s, but other than that fantastic cards.)

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LaP
1 minute ago, LostCat said:

Well, they both support Freesync for a while now, but the 5700s are a huge upgrade :) Nice.  I did the same.

 

(HDR handling seems a little iffy at times right now on the 5700s, but other than that fantastic cards.)

Nah my monitor was not supported by nVidia drivers it would display a black screen with gsync compatible enabled.

 

Yeah lot of people report drivers bugs saying the card is almost unusable but so far i had the card for over a month and played around 15 games without any problem. Definitely a good upgrade at 2k.

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Mindovermaster

We should revamp this poll... LOL

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sinetheo
4 hours ago, LaP said:

I just upgraded my gtx 1070 to a Radeon 5700XT and imo it was worth it. Freesync is very cool. I would say it's definitely better than vsync. Smoother and no input lag at all. You get used to it fast but i would probably not go back to vsync.

How many bsod and crashes have you received. I was told on youtube that the 2070Super is well worth the price premium due to the driver quality

 

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Mindovermaster
1 minute ago, sinetheo said:

How many bsod and crashes have you received. I was told on youtube that the 2070Super is well worth the price premium due to the driver quality

 

'cough cough' driver quality?

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sinetheo
44 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

'cough cough' driver quality?

Nvidia cards don't have any of the issues AMD ones have. If they do they are miner and when an Nvidia card comes out it is rock solid day 1. AMD will take a few years. At least this was the case back when ATI Cataylst was a thing for all their drivers.

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adrynalyne
1 minute ago, sinetheo said:

Nvidia cards don't have any of the issues AMD ones have. If they do they are miner and when an Nvidia card comes out it is rock solid day 1. AMD will take a few years. At least this was the case back when ATI Cataylst was a thing for all their drivers.

What does mining have to do with it? Also, your viewpoint is dated AF.

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Mindovermaster
1 hour ago, sinetheo said:

Nvidia cards don't have any of the issues AMD ones have. If they do they are miner and when an Nvidia card comes out it is rock solid day 1. AMD will take a few years. At least this was the case back when ATI Cataylst was a thing for all their drivers.

ATI was YEARS ago. You are claiming that to today? Lot has changed, bud...

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LaP
4 hours ago, sinetheo said:

How many bsod and crashes have you received. I was told on youtube that the 2070Super is well worth the price premium due to the driver quality

 

So far none.

 

I can't speak for everyone and my experience with AMD is very small it's only my 3rd AMD gpu i own since the early 90ies (i was on nVidia most of the time) but i would say AMD drivers problems are exaggerated for the most part. It's hard to know what is true and not i mean there's so many fanboys on the Internet. So far after 1 month and a week the only game i have trouble with is Fortnite. This said i had problem with Fortnite in the past with my 1070 too so not sure it's the gpu. The game always gave me trouble with my Asus MB and Aura (in the fact it's more than anti cheat system giving me trouble). All the other games i played are working perfectly. So far i played WoW, Destiny 2, Overwatch, Diablo 3, Darksiders, Warframe, Hollow Knight, Path of Exile, Borderlands 3 and some other free games i got on Epic Store i'm probably forgetting.

 

The 2070 was way too expensive in Canada. It was 150$ more expensive (after taxes) than the 5700XT for like 5-7% better performance on average (according to most reviewers). Can't say i'm impressed by RTX either so far it look like the early shaders years where devs were overusing it to make everything shiny. Ray tracing is the future but the current implementation kind of sucks imo. I just could not justify to pay 150$ more for basically almost the same performance. Maybe people having problem with the 5700XT bought the bad models. I know the MSI Evoke is known to run super hot (over 100 Celsius for the memory) because of badly placed thermal pads.

 

Anyway so far so good. Drivers are in very early stage of development too so i expect things to improve. It's a new architecture and there's always bump in the roads coming with it. My last AMD cards was a 5850 something like 12 years ago or so and it was running fine back then i don't expect things to have changed much over AMD. I would say this ignoring the gpu drivers i do prefer Andrenalin 2020 over Geforce Experience actually.

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sinetheo
On 1/4/2020 at 7:11 PM, Mindovermaster said:

ATI was YEARS ago. You are claiming that to today? Lot has changed, bud...

Not according to gamers nexus. Read all the hate comments below 

 

 

So many people had to return their 5700xts after they would crash constantly

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+LostCat
On 1/4/2020 at 9:14 PM, LaP said:

Anyway so far so good. Drivers are in very early stage of development too so i expect things to improve. It's a new architecture and there's always bump in the roads coming with it. My last AMD cards was a 5850 something like 12 years ago or so and it was running fine back then i don't expect things to have changed much over AMD. I would say this ignoring the gpu drivers i do prefer Andrenalin 2020 over Geforce Experience actually.

I hate to say it but I've had far more issues since 19.12.2 than anyone should ever have to deal with o.o

 

Until now I considered AMD drivers pretty solid over the years, this has been a strangely broken experience.  At least it's getting fixed up nicely, but damn.

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LaP
42 minutes ago, LostCat said:

I hate to say it but I've had far more issues since 19.12.2 than anyone should ever have to deal with o.o

 

Until now I considered AMD drivers pretty solid over the years, this has been a strangely broken experience.  At least it's getting fixed up nicely, but damn.

I have 19.12.3 installed and so far it's fine. Like i said Fortnite gives me a black screen after a while but that's the only problem i have. Not sure if it's the drivers or something else no really playing the game anymore so don't really care anyway. I heard the drivers can cause problems (related to the boost) if the fps is not capped and vsync not activated with very high fps. I don't think i capped my fps or activated vsync in Fortnite so that could be the problem but like i said don't really care about the game so meh. Anyway the 2070 Super is simply too expensive in Canada and the 2060 Super performance is a little bit underwhelming for the price. I trust AMD will solve the main issues over the next months specially since the upcoming 5800XT and 5950XT will use the same drivers and arch so i'll keep mine for sure.

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+jnelsoninjax

AMD Ryzen 7 2700/Nvida 2060

Price and performance is simply better AMD route than Intel.

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adrynalyne
10 minutes ago, jnelsoninjax said:

AMD Ryzen 7 2700/Nvida 2060

Price and performance is simply better AMD route than Intel.

Price, yes.

 

Performance...not really these days, unless you go Zen2+ or Zen3.

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+jnelsoninjax
8 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

Price, yes.

 

Performance...not really these days, unless you go Zen2+ or Zen3.

OK, let me rephrase, at the time I put the system together. Now I know it is not as good, but it still works for what I need it for.

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