• Sign in to Neowin Faster!

    Create an account on Neowin to contribute and support the site.

Sign in to follow this  

The last American slave ship may have been discovered

Recommended Posts

techbeck    6,877

1516805312184.thumb.jpg.c9127c5b3c015a959c146a457ad2cdab.jpg

 

Wreckage of the last slave ship to bring slaves to the U.S., the Clotilda, may have been found near Mobile, AL. 

 

According to AL.com, reporter Ben Raines, who normally covers the environment and conservation for the website, found the wreckage in the lower Mobile-Tensaw Delta, during unusually low tides. Experts have suggested the remains could be the Clotilda (sometimes spelled incorrectly as Clotilde), which was burned after delivering captives from what is now the west African nation of Benin to Mobile in 1860, based upon where Raines found it and the way it was built.

 

"I'm quaking with excitement. This would be a story of world historical significance, if this is the Clotilda," John Sledge, a senior historian with Mobile Historical Commission, told AL.com. "It's certainly in the right vicinity... We always knew it should be right around there."

 

Greg Cook, a University of West Florida archaeologist who examined the wreck, agreed with Sledge's assessment. "You can definitely say maybe, and maybe even a little bit stronger, because the location is right, the construction seems to be right, from the proper time period, it appears to be burnt," Cook said. "So I'd say very compelling, for sure."

 

There isn't much left of the ship, which if proven to be the Clotilda, arrived in Mobile Bay for its last voyage, carrying approximately 110 slaves. The hull is tipped over to the port side and almost entirely encapsulated in mud, while the starboard side is nearly fully exposed.

 

A two-masted schooner built in 1855, the Clotilda was approximately 86 feet in length and possessed a beam of 23 feet. Its design was similar to other schooners of the day, which were used to carry lumber and heavy cargo. "These ships were the 18-wheelers of their day," Winthrop Turner, a shipwright specializing in wooden vessels told AL.com.

 

More....

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/01/24/last-american-slave-ship-may-have-been-discovered.html

 

 

Bad part of American history, but history non the less and should never be forgotten.   Also, I do not see the ship in the pic.  Am I missing something?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim K    13,240

The Al.com article has more pictures which may give you a better understanding/perspective. With respect to the above picture...I believe you're looking at the starboard side while the port side is under the water (so pretend you're looking at half a ship).

 

I read this article earlier today at work...so haven't had the chance to look at the images on anything larger than my phone.  Very interesting though...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mando    5,117
19 minutes ago, techbeck said:

1516805312184.thumb.jpg.c9127c5b3c015a959c146a457ad2cdab.jpg

 

Wreckage of the last slave ship to bring slaves to the U.S., the Clotilda, may have been found near Mobile, AL. 

 

According to AL.com, reporter Ben Raines, who normally covers the environment and conservation for the website, found the wreckage in the lower Mobile-Tensaw Delta, during unusually low tides. Experts have suggested the remains could be the Clotilda (sometimes spelled incorrectly as Clotilde), which was burned after delivering captives from what is now the west African nation of Benin to Mobile in 1860, based upon where Raines found it and the way it was built.

 

"I'm quaking with excitement. This would be a story of world historical significance, if this is the Clotilda," John Sledge, a senior historian with Mobile Historical Commission, told AL.com. "It's certainly in the right vicinity... We always knew it should be right around there."

 

Greg Cook, a University of West Florida archaeologist who examined the wreck, agreed with Sledge's assessment. "You can definitely say maybe, and maybe even a little bit stronger, because the location is right, the construction seems to be right, from the proper time period, it appears to be burnt," Cook said. "So I'd say very compelling, for sure."

 

There isn't much left of the ship, which if proven to be the Clotilda, arrived in Mobile Bay for its last voyage, carrying approximately 110 slaves. The hull is tipped over to the port side and almost entirely encapsulated in mud, while the starboard side is nearly fully exposed.

 

A two-masted schooner built in 1855, the Clotilda was approximately 86 feet in length and possessed a beam of 23 feet. Its design was similar to other schooners of the day, which were used to carry lumber and heavy cargo. "These ships were the 18-wheelers of their day," Winthrop Turner, a shipwright specializing in wooden vessels told AL.com.

 

More....

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/01/24/last-american-slave-ship-may-have-been-discovered.html

 

 

Bad part of American history, but history non the less and should never be forgotten.   Also, I do not see the ship in the pic.  Am I missing something?

Silly sausage, its top left....with an authentic blue tarp :woot:  doesnt look THAT old though.

 

Joking aside this is pretty cool and yes while not exactly the best era in modern history, it should be recovered and preserved if possible.

 

Im quite lucky, im from a sea faring family and my nearest city proudly have the Unicorn and the RRS Discovery. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RRS_Discovery

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
techbeck    6,877
4 minutes ago, Jim K said:

The Al.com article has more pictures which may give you a better understanding/perspective. With respect to the above picture...I believe you're looking at the starboard side while the port side is under the water (so pretend you're looking at half a ship).

 

I read this article earlier today at work...so haven't had the chance to look at the images on anything larger than my phone.  Very interesting though...

Will have to check out hte site. Thanks for the info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+Raze    16,512

aATojdr.jpg?1

 

ReMESxl.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
techbeck    6,877

Ok, I was expecting more of a ship then a few boards.  I know it burned, but I had a diff picture in my mind. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FloatingFatMan    18,425
16 hours ago, techbeck said:

Ok, I was expecting more of a ship then a few boards.  I know it burned, but I had a diff picture in my mind. 

Given the amount of time passed, I'm surprised there's as much as there is, left.

 

I hope they're able to get it out intact, it's an important (and dark) part of history that mustn't be forgotten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim K    13,240

...a little video from AL.com about this ...

 

Relying on historical records and accounts from old timers, AL.com may have located the long-lost wreck of the Clotilda, the last slave ship to bring human cargo to the United States.

 

What's left of the ship lies partially buried in mud alongside an island in the lower Mobile-Tensaw Delta, a few miles north of the city of Mobile. The hull is tipped to the port side, which appears almost completely buried in mud. The entire length of the starboard side, however, is almost fully exposed. The wreck, which is normally underwater, was exposed during extreme low tides brought on by the same weather system that brought the "Bomb Cyclone" to the Eastern Seaboard. Low tide around Mobile was about two and a half feet below normal thanks to north winds that blew for days.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim K    13,240

Bummer...it was not the Clotilda.

Quote

Wreck found in Delta not the Clotilda, the last American slave ship

 

The hunt for the wreck of the Clotilda, the last American slave ship, goes on.

 

A previously unexplored 19th century shipwreck discovered in the Mobile-Tensaw Delta, which archaeologists said might be the Clotilda, has been ruled out as the ill-fated ship after further examination this week. In the end, this wreck was simply too big, with a significant portion hidden beneath mud and deep water.

 

AL.com reporter Ben Raines found the wreck when it was exposed along the shoreline of the Mobile River during extreme low tides in the first week of January. The wreck was found alongside an island where Captain William Foster wrote that he burned and sank the Clotilda in 1860. Raines brought archaeologists to the site, who made further examinations during the few days the ship was exposed. Their study set in motion a full-scale investigation of the wreck by the Alabama Historical Commission and the international partners of the Slave Wrecks Project, which include the National Park Service, the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, and Diving with a Purpose - a group of African American divers who donate their time to the Slave Wrecks Project. In addition, SEARCH, one of the world's leading private archaeological exploration firms, provided an archaeological team.

/snip

 

Full article at AL.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
techbeck    6,877

Wreck of last slave ship from Africa located off Alabama coast

https://www.foxnews.com/science/wreck-of-last-slave-ship-from-africa-located-off-alabama-coast

 

Researchers have located the remains of the last known ship to have brought slaves to the U.S. from West Africa, Alabama historical officials announced Wednesday.

 

The Alabama Historical Commission confirmed that the Gulf schooner Clotilda was identified and verified after months of assessment.

 

"For nearly 160 years, the waters around Mobile have concealed the final destination of the Gulf Schooner Clotilda,” the commission said in a statement.

 

"The discovery of the Clotilda is an extraordinary archaeological find," said Lisa Demetropoulos Jones, executive director of the commission. "The voyage represented one of the darkest eras of modern history and is a profound discovery of the tangible evidence of slavery."

 

In 1860, Clotilda illegally transported 110 men, women and children to Mobile from what is now the African country of Benin. The ship was then taken into delta waters north of the port and burned.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim K    13,240

Just for clarification ... the ship that has been posted in this thread is not the Clotilda.  They found the Clotilda around the same area.

 

Here is a PBS clip...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.