• Sign in to Neowin Faster!

    Create an account on Neowin to contribute and support the site.

Falcon 9: HisdeSat PAZ, SpaceX MicroSat 2a/b

Recommended Posts

DocM    14,589

Launch site: Vandenberg SLC-4E
Launch date: February 17, 2018
Launch window: 0922 Eastern, 0622 Pacific (1422 UT) 
Core: B1038.2 (FormoSat-5)
Stage recovery: no

 

3 major payloads 

 

PAZ

Owner: HisdeSat (Spanish govt)
Builder: Astrium España
Type: X-Band synthetic aperture radar
Mass: ~1,400kg
Orbit: 505km sun-synchronous polar orbit

 

MicroSat 2a and 2b

Owner: SpaceX 
Builder: SpaceX 
Type: StarLink data constellation test 
Mass: ~386kg (each)
Size: ~1.1×0.7x0.7m
Solar: ~2×8m (x2)
Comms: Ku-Band, laser
Propulsion: Hall effect electric thrusters
Orbit: 514×514km
Inclination: 97.44°

 

PAZ
paz__1.jpg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
anthdci    185
1 hour ago, DocM said:

 

 

 

At what point will static fire be forgotten? Do planes do a static engine test before take off? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589
47 minutes ago, anthdci said:

At what point will static fire be forgotten? Do planes do a static engine test before take off? 

What makes you think jet pilots, or their computers, don't check the engine sensors before taking off?

 

You can't do a static fire with solid rockets because they're single-use and the test data on one isn't transferrable to another.

 

Many rockets do a Wet Dress Rehersal (WDR)  where they fill the tanks, do a countdown and stop just before igniting the engines. This stoppage is usually because the engines can endure only a few firings, or sometimes only one.

 

SpaceX's Merlin 1D engines are designed for many firings and reuse, both on test stands and during missions, with little refurbishment.  Over 400 Merlin 1D's have flown, many have reflown, and all underwent several firings before the next launch. It's an extremely tough engine. This allows a Wet Dress Rehersal where they actually fire the engines as a final quality check before launch. 

 

They may discontinue static fires down the road, but as they say; "if it ain't broke, don't fix it."

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
anthdci    185
8 hours ago, DocM said:

What makes you think jet pilots, or their computers, don't check the engine sensors before taking off?

 

You can't do a static fire with solid rockets because they're single-use and the test data on one isn't transferrable to another.

 

Many rockets do a Wet Dress Rehersal (WDR)  where they fill the tanks, do a countdown and stop just before igniting the engines. This stoppage is usually because the engines can endure only a few firings, or sometimes only one.

 

SpaceX's Merlin 1D engines are designed for many firings and reuse, both on test stands and during missions, with little refurbishment.  Over 400 Merlin 1D's have flown, many have reflown, and all underwent several firings before the next launch. It's an extremely tough engine. This allows a Wet Dress Rehersal where they actually fire the engines as a final quality check before launch. 

 

They may discontinue static fires down the road, but as they say; "if it ain't broke, don't fix it."

 

 

To be honest I was more thinking bfr. Booster goes up, comes back down to the pad. Is refilled and goes up again in the animation. No static fire between..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

Probably true but the full flow cycle is considered ideal for reuse, tough, and they're using low residue propellants. 

 

We'll see once the Spaceship tests start.

 

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

SpaceX has changed the insertion altitude for MicroSat 2a and MicroSat 2b.  Instead of 514x514km they'll inject to a 511x511km orbit at 97.44°. They'll then use their Hall effect plasma thrusters to raise their orbits to 1,125km.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Unobscured Vision    2,466

I'm smelling a test of the propulsion system. :yes: See how well it really works, etc.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

IMG_20180216_205100.thumb.jpg.91925722710eb1b0d94601bc739f1cfe.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

5 minute StarLink transmitter test at a Redmond, WA StarLink lab.

 

FCC....

 

Quote

Explanation

This STA is necessary to authorize brief testing of a satellite communications transmitter in Redmond, Washington. The test itself will be under 5 minutes in duration.


Purpose of Operation

The brief test will utilize a directional antenna to transmit along an azimuth/elevation path from one horizon to the other. This is a final verification test of ground equipment prior to the testing performed with the experimental satellite documented in the Experimental License Application, File #0298-EX-CN-2016. Transmission will be of the 13.85 - 14 GHz commanding in said experimental license application.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

Hmmmm.....Fairing 2.0? Supposed to be wider (from 5.2m to 5.4m? Or more?), made longer if needed.

 

 

 

Launch date: Feb 21st 
Backup launch date: Feb 22nd 
Launch time:  0917 EST, 0617 PST (1417 UT)

 

Quote

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

From: 30th Space Wing Public Affairs,

www.vandenberg.af.mil

Falcon 9 Paz launch delayed

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying a PAZ payload from Space Launch Co lex-4, is delayed to allow for additional time to perform final checkouts of the upgraded fairing. The Falcon 9 and payload remain healthy.

The launch is rescheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 21, at 6:17 a.m. PST.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

Tidbits from the MicroSat FCC license,

 

Quote

The primary structure for the Microsat-2a and -2b test spacecraft will be a box design measuring 1.1m x 0.7m x 0.7m and carries the spacecraft flight computer, power system components, attitude determination and control components, propulsion components, GPS receiver, and broadband, telemetry, and command receivers and transmitters. The primary bus is mounted on the payload truss system, which also carries communications panels, inter-satellite optical link transmitters and receivers, star trackers, and a telemetry antenna. There are two 2x8 meter solar panels. Each demonstration spacecraft has a total mass of approximately 400kg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skiver    1,912

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

Hispasat 30W-6 ≠ HisdeSat PAZ ;)

 

Belongs here

 

 

Edited by DocM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Beittil    489

We could easily consolidate launch topics into a format l where every launch doesn't have its own topic. It is not exactly NSF here in levels of reactions and viewing :p

 

And with launch cadence in the elevator going up... Might as well just do something like:

 

SpaceX west coast launches

SpaceX east coast launches 

SpaceX general topic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

SpaceX General could remain the Updates thread. 6 of one....

 

I was thinking West/East/Boca Chica threads soon - in H2 2018 it's gonna be rapid fire, then get faster as StarLink and BFR tests ramp up.

 

How about starting them with the first Block 5 mission?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

Rolled out and upright for tomorrows launch.
 
Weather 90%

Edited by DocM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skiver    1,912
15 hours ago, Skiver said:

 

The second line of that is referring to this launch, no?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

 

 

RP-1 loading

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

 

LOX load

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skiver    1,912

I understand they are moving on to block 5 so there's no real reusability with the first stage here and therefore they aren't recovering but is there a reason why they don't just do it anyway? I know they're pretty successful on recovery now but surely it can still present an opportunity to learn? I assume it's a purely financial decision, in that it costs more to recover?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocM    14,589

Scrubbed - upper level winds 

 

They're going to do another high-G 3 engine water touchdown test like with GovSat-1.  No need to keep the old cores with Block 5 so close.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.