Debian Linux is now available in the Microsoft Store, runs on Windows 10


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Greg Zeng

Followed instructions from:

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/commandline/2018/03/06/debian-gnulinux-for-wsl-now-available-in-the-windows-store/

Then had the following results...

 

> https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wsl/install-win10
> Windows 10 Installation Guide

Tried posting as this web site claims:

 

> "Windows PowerShell

> "Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

> PS C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0> Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows-Subs

ystem-Linux

> Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature : The requested operation requires elevation.

> At line:1 char:1

> + Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows- ...

> + ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

>     + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature], COMException

>     + FullyQualifiedErrorId : Microsoft.Dism.Commands.EnableWindowsOptionalFeatureCommand

 PS C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0>

What have I done wrong?

========

Then downloaded the "Debian GNU/Linux application from the Microsoft store.

I installed itself.  When I ran,it gave the following screen:

> The WSL optional component is not enabled. Please enable it and try again.

?

> See https://aka.ms/wslinstall for details.

> Error: 0x8007007e

> Press any key to continue...

==========

Running Windows-10 Home Insider Preview, Build 17074 ... 180116-1539

All drivers etc are updated.  Only authorized Ms malware protection.  Running on Dell XPS-15, 16 GB DDR2, Intel i7, Samsung 850 SSD (one terabyte).

Thank you.

 

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  • 9 months later...
PGHammer

Not surprising in the least.  Ubuntu is Debian-based; the shocker would be Debian itself NOT showing up.

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adrynalyne
59 minutes ago, PGHammer said:

Not surprising in the least.  Ubuntu is Debian-based; the shocker would be Debian itself NOT showing up.

Literally any distro can be used with WSL. The store just makes it easier. 

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PGHammer
2 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

Literally any distro can be used with WSL. The store just makes it easier. 

Exactly - didn't RHEL show up two versions back?

 

A bigger surprise would be a UNIX (such as a Solaris fork) - showing up via WSL - would that make it WSU (Windows Subsystem for UNIX)?  (Not impossible - POSIX for NT was actually a thing.)

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