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Bell Fibe/Fibre internet (PPPoE) and UniFi

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Matthew S.    643

So I'm switching Internet and TV providers from Cogeco to Bell Canada due to a recent service outage in the area that they wouldn't treat with the correct priority level (5 days to get a tech to come out and verify lines were cut, ffs).  Anyways we are getting FTTN but will be automatically upgraded to FTTH sometime next year.

 

My question is I don't want to use their Home Hub 3000 due to security reasons and I'm planning on wiring up my house anyways for CAT6, can I use the UniFi Family of equipment without needing to put the Home Hub on the inside of the network for their IPTV service?

 

As far as I can tell so far their fiber internet uses VLan35 but theres mixed sources stating their TV service uses VLan34, 36, & 37 on the WAN side, is it possible to configure the UniFi equipment to handle this setup?

 

Mostly this is directed to @BudMan

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+BudMan    3,349

Which unifi router are you wanting to use the USG or the USG Pro, the edgerouter series?

 

Pretty sure all of them support vlans.. To be honest to break out vlans all you need is 30$ smart switch... So yeah any switch that undstands vlans can be used to break out your TV vlan before you send traffic to your router..  So you could then use any 20$ soho wifi router if you wanted..

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Matthew S.    643

I'm probably going to go with the USG Pro on their newest one since it accepts SFP WAN modules, the only thing is I've been reading it seems to require the vlan tagging on the WAN side of things :S (is this even possible?)

 

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r31118482-Yes-you-CAN-bypass-the-HomeHub-3000

 

May need your help when I set this up next year lol 

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+BudMan    3,349

If the device supports vlans - doesn't matter what interface it goes into.. But if all you need to do is break out TV from your internet just use a smart smart switch...

 

You take the connection from your ISP device plug it into switch port with the vlan tags.. Then set other ports to be on the vlan you want and connect your devices... Its not freaking rocket science ;)

 

You do understand they sell switches with sfp, sfp+ slots right.. If what your wanting to do is breakout vlans - you normally wouldn't connect that direct to router if what your wanting to do is have a isolated layer 2 for your TV, and such.. Your inputs into your "router" would be for ROUTING..

 

So you take the input that has the tags on it into a switch.. You then break out the vlans and send them to where they need to go.. 1 to your TV network other to your router..

 

Here maybe drawing help

vlanbreakoutswitch.thumb.png.3879c27122e64c79077159daff260e36.png

 

 

Take a switch - you input the connection with the vlans on it... then break out the vlans to different ports and connect the device(s) as needed for whatever the ISP is putting on those vlans... If you need too send multiple of those vlans to your router because you are going to get an IP and route them..

 

Comes down to breaking out the vlans and sending them to where they need to go.. But that is not really the job of a "router/firewall" while sure it can use vlans for multiple network segments.. That it routes between, etc..  If one of those vlans is TV stuff and goes to your TV via a stb or something you can break those vlans out via your switch that understand vlans.. And has the appropriate media connections and speeds you need.. Be it different sorts of fiber connection via a sfp or sfp+ module or copper, etc.

 

Vlans are Layer 2... Routing is at layer 3.. So while yes you have inputs at layer 2 into a router interface... The router doesn't really care about the layer 2 info.. Sure you can setup interfaces on a router to listen for specific tags, and create new interfaces with different layer 3 networks on them... When you need to split up your layer 2 vlans to go to different devices you would just do that at the switch layer..

 

 

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Farchord    358

I thought I'd reply here because I have worked on my Bell Fibe implementation at home for a good... 40-50 hours now XD so I got a pretty good understanding.

 

So budman for the most part is right. But Bell Fibe FTTH is  bit particular. I had two types of setup:

 

A combo of the TP-Link Media Converter and a OpenWRT router (In my case, the Linksys WRT3200ACM) and, later, replaced by just a Ubiquity EdgeRouter X SFP (Which I later regretted - I had gigabit and it couldn't fully handle it).

 

Here's a link to the Media converter: https://www.tp-link.com/us/products/details/cat-43_MC220L.html

 

So, about the setup.

 

Bell Fibe (In Ontario and Quebec anyway; this differs slightly in the Atlantic with FibreOP), Internet runs on VLAN34, TV on VLAN35.

 

Internet is the easy part. Tag the VLAN34 port, and run PPPoE on it. The VLAN34 port in itself doesn't need DHCP (But PPPoE does ofc). Then, I personally set myself up a LAN on that, and ran my computers on it. Internet Works.

 

TV was a bit more of a tricky thing. Same basic setup though, but it depends on the amount of TV modems you have. But you tag the VLAN35 port, run a 2nd lan on that (That's what I did anyway) and feed those to the modems, while making sure multicast works.

 

So at that point, your internet should work, and your tv should *kinda* work. If you were like me, at that point, your TV should cut randomly, and apps/VOD will not work.

 

How I fixed this is that, it seems the DHCP on VLAN35 does fetch an IP, but it misses a route. I'd have to capture the traffic on the port, and I was able to guess the gateway. Truthfully, I don't remember how I did it, but for me, traffic going to 10.0.0.0/8 had to be targeted to the following gateway: 10.152.16.1. Your mileage may vary on this.

 

Note if you plan on getting the Phone Service through fibe, I have 0 experience on this, and most people said they can't get it to work.

 

I stopped using this whole setup around July of this year because I moved to an appartment on top of my mom's house, and frankly, they don't have the same kind of tolerance to geeky stuff, and they use alot of wifi TV modems, which I figured was way too much of a pain to make work.

 

But good luck with this! If you need help lemme know.

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+BudMan    3,349

If you thought a 49$ router X could handle gig - yeah prob not.. Not sure what the sfp model runs but other than the interface prob same hardware.

 

I know their USG can do 500mbps without much trouble as long as you don't turn on anything that disables hardware offload - if so your going to drop to like 100 maybe 120mbps..

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Farchord    358
Just now, BudMan said:

If you thought a 49$ router X could handle gig - yeah prob not.. Not sure what the sfp model runs but other than the interface prob same hardware.

 

I know their USG can do 500mbps without much trouble as long as you don't turn on anything that disables hardware offload - if so your going to drop to like 100 maybe 120mbps..

Well noone said I always make good decisions... <.<'

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Matthew S.    643

Don't ever plan on going back to bell for phone service, quite happy with my phone service through my grandfathered vonage plan :D

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ontarioftthiot    1
Posted (edited)
On 12/9/2018 at 8:16 AM, Farchord said:

So, about the setup.

 

Bell Fibe (In Ontario and Quebec anyway; this differs slightly in the Atlantic with FibreOP), Internet runs on VLAN34, TV on VLAN35.

I live in Ontario and have Bell FTTH going directly into a SFP Port on my US-8-150W.  The Internet traffic is tagged with VLAN 35 not VLAN 34 as Farchord is seeing in Shawinigan.  

 

In my journey to get this up last year I noted that the VLAN tagging varied across providers and geographic regions so just make sure that you note the way it is tagged by your provider.  

 

🙂

 

"Show me a person paying for  porn   tv and I'll show you someone who doesn't know how to use the Internet"

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