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USB Type-C Hub does not work with extension cable

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FusionGuy    0

I purchased the Satechi USB Type-C hub for my PC. My motherboard has a Type-C connector on the rear I/O. The hub works fine  if I connect it directly to the port but the cable is only 12" so I purchased a USB 3.1 Type -C male to female extension cable. But Windows gives me a USB Device Not Recognized when I connect it through the extension cable. So I purchased another cable from a different manufacturer and its the same thing. Is there a specific cable that needs to be used for a hub?

 

There error in device manager goes like this:

 

Windows has stopped this device because it has reported problems. (Code 43)

A request for the USB device descriptor failed.

 

 

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Brandon H    2,351

likely not enough power being pushed from the USB port to compensate for the extra cable length.

I've run into a couple topics recently that had the same issue

 

you may need a hub with a dedicated power supply to compensate

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Jim K    12,043

How long of an extension cable?  Since it is working with a shorter cable .... your extension cable is too long.  Have you tried an Active USB extension cable?  Probably doesn't help that the Satechi is unpowered.

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FusionGuy    0
3 minutes ago, Jim K said:

How long of an extension cable?  Since it is working with a shorter cable .... your extension cable is too long.  Have you tried an Active USB extension cable?  Probably doesn't help that Satechi unpowered.

Its only 3.3ft. It didn't think that would be an issue. Is there something in Windows that can be adjusted?

 

Below is one of them. The other is made by COOYA. Both purchased on Amazon.

http://www.cablecreation.com/product/content/201702/1855.html

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Brandon H    2,351
2 minutes ago, FusionGuy said:

Its only 3.3ft. It didn't think that would be an issue. Is there something in Windows that can be adjusted?

nope; output wattage is controlled by the mobo; some mobo's have a specified high output usb port meant for charging devices. you could check for that (usually the port is labeled with a different color or something)

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goretsky    985

Hello,

 

Try using a USB 3.1 Gen 2 USB-C to USB-C cable that has USB-IF certification for that specific rate.

 

USB-C extension cables (especially with a female USB-C connector) are not allowed by the specification.  This doesn't mean that they automatically won't work (none of the USB specifications have allowed for extension cables, as I recall, despite many companies making ones that work), but in USB 3.0's case, with the higher signalling rate, I'd imagine you would need some kind of active repeater-type circuitry (unsure of the exact term) to regenerate the digital signal so it is clean enough to work without data loss.  It's also why it's pretty unlikely any of those extension cables are going to have the USB logo on them/their packaging.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

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+DevTech    1,395
5 hours ago, goretsky said:

Hello,

 

Try using a USB 3.1 Gen 2 USB-C to USB-C cable that has USB-IF certification for that specific rate.

 

USB-C extension cables (especially with a female USB-C connector) are not allowed by the specification.  This doesn't mean that they automatically won't work (none of the USB specifications have allowed for extension cables, as I recall, despite many companies making ones that work), but in USB 3.0's case, with the higher signalling rate, I'd imagine you would need some kind of active repeater-type circuitry (unsure of the exact term) to regenerate the digital signal so it is clean enough to work without data loss.  It's also why it's pretty unlikely any of those extension cables are going to have the USB logo on them/their packaging.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

The HUB unit he linked is obviously USB 3.1 Gen 1 and is unpowered.

 

We are missing his mobo brand and model number and so we don't know what the USB spec is for that. It could even be Thunderbolt 3!

 

The Thunderbolt 3 spec requires an Active Circuit Cable longer than 1 m (as I recall) so perhaps that cable might also actively extend a USB 3.1 signal?

 

 

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FusionGuy    0
13 hours ago, goretsky said:

Hello,

 

Try using a USB 3.1 Gen 2 USB-C to USB-C cable that has USB-IF certification for that specific rate.

 

USB-C extension cables (especially with a female USB-C connector) are not allowed by the specification.  This doesn't mean that they automatically won't work (none of the USB specifications have allowed for extension cables, as I recall, despite many companies making ones that work), but in USB 3.0's case, with the higher signalling rate, I'd imagine you would need some kind of active repeater-type circuitry (unsure of the exact term) to regenerate the digital signal so it is clean enough to work without data loss.  It's also why it's pretty unlikely any of those extension cables are going to have the USB logo on them/their packaging.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

I had no idea the specs don't allow a male to female extension. That could be the culprit. Anyways I contacted the manufacturer and asked them why their hub doesn't work with extension cables. Hopefully they get back to me with an answer.

7 hours ago, DevTech said:

The HUB unit he linked is obviously USB 3.1 Gen 1 and is unpowered.

 

We are missing his mobo brand and model number and so we don't know what the USB spec is for that. It could even be Thunderbolt 3!

 

The Thunderbolt 3 spec requires an Active Circuit Cable longer than 1 m (as I recall) so perhaps that cable might also actively extend a USB 3.1 signal?

 

 

My mobo is an ASUS Maximus XI Extreme. There is a power option in the UEFI for the Type-C port. Right now its set to Auto. There is a warning displayed that if you set it to Enabled and made the wrong connections it could damage the board so I don't know if I want to enable it without actually understanding what it does.

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+DevTech    1,395
25 minutes ago, FusionGuy said:

I had no idea the specs don't allow a male to female extension. That could be the culprit. Anyways I contacted the manufacturer and asked them why their hub doesn't work with extension cables. Hopefully they get back to me with an answer.

My mobo is an ASUS Maximus XI Extreme. There is a power option in the UEFI for the Type-C port. Right now its set to Auto. There is a warning displayed that if you set it to Enabled and made the wrong connections it could damage the board so I don't know if I want to enable it without actually understanding what it does.

Yeah that HUB is just not designed well. It should have a socket so you can just use a longer standard cable. There are so many gadgets on the market that whenever I see bad design, I avoid a brand since badness in design is essentially a stupid human engineer polluting who knows what else...

 

If the ASUS port is Gen 2, then just get a Gen 2 hub so everything will just work better. And with USB 3.0, ALWAYS get a POWERED HUB - you can't miss it because the power brick is the same size as a laptop one, due to the USB 3.0 Spec. Otherwise, you have a medical problem known as "Shoot Self In Foot Syndrome". 

 

Addendum: Just checked ASUS site and it is Gen 2. Simply NUTS not to get a Gen 2 HUB.

 

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