Israel Moon Landing live stream?


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+BudMan

Anyone watching the live stream on YouTube?

 

 

Other then the nonsense going on in the chat.. Flat Earther idiots and just hate everwhere.. WTF is the world coming too?

 

Starts in like an hour... Hoping for a good stream and successful landing!

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+Biscuits Brown

i was going to tune is closer to landing time to avoid as much of the drivel as possible.

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+BudMan

I just hid the chat window ;)

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+Biscuits Brown

I just opened up the feed and did the same.

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+BudMan

Not sure what is worse the religious nut jobs or the flat earth idiots?

 

What are such people on such a feed???

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Brandon H

i just have it running on this page in it's own tab

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+Biscuits Brown

At least there won't be much of a language barrier, a spacecraft landing is just that. If it's a success, people cheer, if not, they hang their heads.

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+BudMan

my stream keeps crashing

 

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+Biscuits Brown

Same crashes here. Seems random.  Oddly enough the youtube steam on my phone hasnt yet crashed, just the desktop.

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Snake89

This is the best lan party game ever made. So many people needing to work together for one objective.

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Jim K

It crashed into the Moon after main engine failure. RIP Beresheet.

 

Space is hard....

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DocM

But they learned many lessons. I'm sure they'll try again.

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+Biscuits Brown

Well, they came close, very close, and need to be commended for effort.   Yep, space is hard.

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Jim K

Just watched the video in the OP ... have to say it is pretty neat they were getting data all the way to the surface.  

 

At 33:14 everything was normal ... Vertical velocity had been steady around 22-24 m/s

Data froze at 33:19 ... vertical velocity at 24.8 m/s - altitude at 13.3

Data comes back at 34:23 - vertical velocity has increased to 47.2 m/s - altitude at 11km

From 34:23 to 36:44 - vertical velocity increases until loss of signal reaching a peak of 134.3 m/s ... altitude 149 meters.

 

At 36:44 you can hear one of the announcers state that "we have the main engine back on" ... but the guy with him goes "no, but it's not ... no no"

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