• Sign in to Neowin Faster!

    Create an account on Neowin to contribute and support the site.

GeForce GT 750M drivers and the latest 430.xx version. How to?

Recommended Posts

kiddingguy    49

The GT 750M GPU for notebooks has the latest driver listed as 425.31.

However, nvidia has released newer drivers - also fixing a couple of bugs.

 

Is there some way/workaround as to get the latest drivers also working in a legit way for the 750M?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brandon H    2,634

support for the 7xx notebook models has ended moved to legacy support I believe so I don't think there's a legit way to update without modifying the installer or installing the .cab files manually

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GeForce_700_series#Discontinued_support

https://nvidia.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4779

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+DevTech    1,446

Bad enough that both AMD and NVIDIA expect you to make an expensive purchase of a new GPU card when they make arbitrary decisons to drop support. For a family with multiple gaming capable computers that's ouch!

 

But for laptops, upgrades are almost never possible and even the few laptop lines with pluggable GPU, the cost is nasty. So a simple support change on a laptop driver has a larger impact than desktop, forcing the purchase of an entire laptop to upgrade GPU

 

Considering the huge impact to consumers, a small amount of political activism might change some of these "hidden" decisions... But geeks are geeks, and there is a mixed mash of feelings here since the event also leads to an excuse to embrace the lust for the latest GPU!

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
goretsky    1,003

Hello,

Just because something is no longer supported doesn't mean it will magically stop working the day it goes end-of-life.  In this case, the GPU will continue working, it just isn't receiving updates for its device drivers any more.  Even if compatibility breaks with Windows 10, it's likely you will still be able to use it with legacy versions of Windows.  This may require some changes in how you use it, though.  For example, no longer allowing it access to the Internet since it no longer receives security updates.  It may still be useful for writing, watching DVDs and Blu-rays and other tasks that can be done without an Internet connection.

The technology in the computing industry changes more quickly than in many other industries, and the ways in which they are used differ as well.  A forty-year-old car may still be usable; a forty-year-old home computer less so.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kiddingguy    49

Too bad. Especially, since the non-M models (for PC's) are still supported in the 7xx nvidia lineup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Daniel F.    559

yeah modifying the INF is now the only way

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+DevTech    1,446
13 hours ago, kiddingguy said:

Too bad. Especially, since the non-M models (for PC's) are still supported in the 7xx nvidia lineup.

Yeah, that's just insulting. Desktop 6xx are also still supported. Even something like the 640 which I think is just a 5xx retread.

 

It doesn't make tech sense since there are often multiple chip generations in each "branding" era...

 

And drivers often have branching logic for just a single game so it's not really coding cost, but probably the layout of their testing lab.

 

The decision is probably driven by some spreadsheet or these days even an AI algorithm to predict how many of their customers will really squawk back at them if they get dumped

 

Us tech geeks here at Neowin don't help the situation when we meekly like sheep use the situation as a chance to open our wallets and get the shiney new gadget, but honestly who isn't dying to go 2080?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+DevTech    1,446
13 hours ago, goretsky said:

Hello,

Just because something is no longer supported doesn't mean it will magically stop working the day it goes end-of-life.  In this case, the GPU will continue working, it just isn't receiving updates for its device drivers any more.  Even if compatibility breaks with Windows 10, it's likely you will still be able to use it with legacy versions of Windows.  This may require some changes in how you use it, though.  For example, no longer allowing it access to the Internet since it no longer receives security updates.  It may still be useful for writing, watching DVDs and Blu-rays and other tasks that can be done without an Internet connection.

The technology in the computing industry changes more quickly than in many other industries, and the ways in which they are used differ as well.  A forty-year-old car may still be usable; a forty-year-old home computer less so.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

Actually, the security situation is not as bad as that. You can switch to the built-in Windows 10 driver and stay secure forever.

 

But I would rather not do that since the quality of the ever evolving current NVIDIA driver is also improved for normal desktop 2D usage so even if you retire a computer for gaming use, the driver death can be noticed by productivity workers with hi-res displays and multiple monitors.

 

For example, when I am running hundreds of browser windows with 2,000 total TABS, I can certainly notice stability differences between different versions of the NVIDIA driver, mostly improving very slowly version by version since the 2D desktop code is very OLD.

 

The reason we see those small evolving improvements being pushed out to us is TELEMETRY. Yup, that thing that people stupidly complain about in Windows 10, means that major software products like video device drivers product millions of crash Telemetry payloads across BILLIONS of computers!

 

So, although the hardware does not stop working, there is a kind of interactive/living complex ecosystem yielding a very real sense of loss when YOUR hardware gets dumped...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
goretsky    1,003

Hello,

Are you talking about the Microsoft Basic Display Adapter?  That will work, of course, but performance may be... lacking.

Speaking as an employee of a software vendor, receiving Windows Error Reporting fault buckets can actually pretty useful at times.  And the information received is stripped of any kind of personally-identifiable information, in case anyone ever wonders about that.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+DevTech    1,446
1 hour ago, goretsky said:

Hello,

Are you talking about the Microsoft Basic Display Adapter?  That will work, of course, but performance may be... lacking.

Speaking as an employee of a software vendor, receiving Windows Error Reporting fault buckets can actually pretty useful at times.  And the information received is stripped of any kind of personally-identifiable information, in case anyone ever wonders about that.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

 

Not "Basic Adapter"

 

If you don't install the NVIDIA driver from NVIDIA, Microsoft delivers a Windows 10 driver from the Microsoft Servers that is indirectly sourced from NVIDIA.

 

So when NVIDIA drops support, Microsoft will figure out what to shoot down the pipe to you and keep it properly tested for security if you uninstall the NVIDIA driver in a manner that reverts to the Windows 10 default. (When uninstalling, all files must be deleted so that the NVIDIA download is no longer hits the top rank in the "best fit" algorithm)

 

For most tech oriented people, it is still probably better to stick with the NVIDIA "retired" version that might still get updates once in a blue moon but in that respect I think AMD might be a bit nicer.

 

ALL OPTIONS ARE ANNOYING in some way for a tech user with perfectly functioning GPU Silicon.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
goretsky    1,003

Hello,

 

It's been a while since I have gone through the process of getting device drivers WHQL-signed, but developers have the option of making them available through the Windows Update Catalog.  There are various kinds of hardware ID's assigned to hardware that are used to identify it, and that's what is queried to determine which device driver to download.  This allows for there to be manufacturer-specific customizations of drivers,so that you don't end up downloading a device driver that doesn't work with a "special edition" of a video card that supports a different feature set than the reference version.  But the drivers come from the hardware vendor.

 

Fun fact:  Sometimes, software has it's own device drivers for use in working with disk or network I/O streams.  In these cases, programs like software firewalls can end up having to go through the WHQL certification process.  Here are a couple of examples of such drivers in the Windows Update Catalog:   https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=McAfee and https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=Kaspersky.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+DevTech    1,446
1 hour ago, goretsky said:

Fun fact:  Sometimes, software has it's own device drivers

It can be even more of a "WIld West" than "secret" software device drivers since drivers don't need WHQL, just a valid digital signature.

 

In any case you can see all the software drivers in Device Manager by selecting "View Hidden Devices"

 

There is also a kind of device driver hierarchy where each level has a more low level interaction with Windows:

 

1. Software Device Driver

 

2. Drivers for USB connected devices 

 

3. BUS Drivers for silicon on cards plugged into your PCI bus or PCIe bus.

 

4. Video Device Drivers can do almost anything and there aren't very many people doing those...

 

I have programmed PCI Bus device drivers and it is quite the experience. The number of ways to Bluescreen Windows is unlimited! And also lock up Windows completely. You usually ping-pong back and forth between those two states until you get your interrupt code just right...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brandon H    2,634
15 hours ago, DevTech said:

Actually, the security situation is not as bad as that. You can switch to the built-in Windows 10 driver and stay secure forever.

 

But I would rather not do that since the quality of the ever evolving current NVIDIA driver is also improved for normal desktop 2D usage so even if you retire a computer for gaming use, the driver death can be noticed by productivity workers with hi-res displays and multiple monitors.

 

For example, when I am running hundreds of browser windows with 2,000 total TABS, I can certainly notice stability differences between different versions of the NVIDIA driver, mostly improving very slowly version by version since the 2D desktop code is very OLD.

 

The reason we see those small evolving improvements being pushed out to us is TELEMETRY. Yup, that thing that people stupidly complain about in Windows 10, means that major software products like video device drivers product millions of crash Telemetry payloads across BILLIONS of computers!

 

So, although the hardware does not stop working, there is a kind of interactive/living complex ecosystem yielding a very real sense of loss when YOUR hardware gets dumped...

 

The card is still in Legacy support so it will still get security updates per my URL above; just no new 'Game-Ready' drivers aka further enhancements

 

https://nvidia.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4779

 

Quote

Critical security updates will be available on systems utilizing mobile Kepler-series GPUs through April 2020.

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
+DevTech    1,446
6 hours ago, Brandon H said:

The card is still in Legacy support so it will still get security updates per my URL above; just no new 'Game-Ready' drivers aka further enhancements

 

https://nvidia.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4779

 

 

Not sure what you are trying to say. A security update is just a security update and has nothing to do with what I was saying. And I'm not holding my breath anyways that a video driver is some sort of huge vector for security breaches...

 

What I was saying is that the latest driver updates improve stability in basic everyday desktop operation that will no longer be available even though that kind of bug fix type improvement is not dependent on the underlying silicon chip level.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brandon H    2,634
3 minutes ago, DevTech said:

Not sure what you are trying to say. A security update is just a security update and has nothing to do with what I was saying. And I'm not holding my breath anyways that a video driver is some sort of huge vector for security breaches...

 

What I was saying is that the latest driver updates improve stability in basic everyday desktop operation that will no longer be available even though that kind of bug fix type improvement is not dependent on the underlying silicon chip level.

 

sorry, I should have cut out the rest of your quote; I was just commenting on the first sentence.

Nvidia is still continuing security updates so no need to switch to the generic driver (yet)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.