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Warranty void if removed stickers?

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zhangm    1,332

Due to falling NVMe drive prices, I've been doing a few upgrades lately. I couldn't help but notice that the ones I received are decorated with a "Warranty void if removed" sticker glued right onto the memory chips. Are these stickers still legal (or were they ever, and other shady warranty caveats like requiring registration)? IIRC the FTC recently started reminding a limited set of hardware manufacturers that they had to remove this stipulation from their warranties. Basically, is it safe to just remove the sticker?

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+Raze    16,025

You're correct about the FTC - http://fortune.com/2018/04/11/ftc-warranty-void-stickers/

 

For myself I remove them, however some of them are self-destructing and tear easily and can be very difficult to remove cleanly.

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Jim K    12,609

I would be hesitant in removing the sticker (especially if it contains the serial number).  Even though the FTC said yadda yadda ... I would go by whatever the manufacture says on their website.  Looking at Samsung it appears they are saying "nope, don't remove it" 

Quote

You can refer to a non-exhaustive list of examples of the warranty exclusions below:

 

  • improperly packaged or shipped, including use of non-qualified shipping container;
  • any alterations, modifications, or physical damage of the Product, including but not limited to, deep scratches;
  • any alterations, modifications, or removal of any SAMSUNG labels or barcodes on the Product;
  • opened SSD casing; or
  • tampered or missing tape seal or serial number.

https://www.samsung.com/semiconductor/minisite/ssd/support/warranty/

 

 

... while ASUS updated their warranty information with the following ...

Quote

We have provided a summary of notable updates to the ASUS Warranty Information Form for the United States:

- Your warranty shall remain intact regardless if you perform the repair or seek repair services from a non-authorized third party.  If damages arise from such repair then ASUS is not responsible for such damages resulting from the repair.

- Your warranty shall not be void if any warranty seals are altered, tampered, or removed.

https://www.asus.com/us/support/article/925/

 

/shrug

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Mindovermaster    1,725
Posted (edited)

Technically, companies are not allowed (though they still do it) to say "void warranty" on anything. In the US at least, that I know of...

 

Don't worry about it, if you are picky about it, take the "void warranty" sticker off. This way, the company can not say "you broke the sticker" (technically, you didn't 😛 )

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shockz    5,289

Why do you need to pull a sticker off an nvme anyways? Mine sits under the motherboard, and even if it didn't it's not like I'd be starting at it all the time. Even with a clear case...

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nekrosoft13    702
42 minutes ago, shockz said:

Why do you need to pull a sticker off an nvme anyways? Mine sits under the motherboard, and even if it didn't it's not like I'd be starting at it all the time. Even with a clear case...

some people take them off to apply a heatsink to the memory chips and controller.

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+DevTech    1,495
2 hours ago, shockz said:

Why do you need to pull a sticker off an nvme anyways? Mine sits under the motherboard, and even if it didn't it's not like I'd be starting at it all the time. Even with a clear case...

 

1 hour ago, nekrosoft13 said:

some people take them off to apply a heatsink to the memory chips and controller.

Modern NVMe drives can get very hot if being used for useful computing tasks.

 

The drive is smart enough to throttle back to avoid damage so a heatsink is very valuable to maintain speed for a top-end drive that is actually being used for something other than checking Facebook status...

 

 

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adrynalyne    11,189
4 hours ago, Mindovermaster said:

Technically, companies are not allowed (though they still do it) to say "void warranty" on anything. In the US at least, that I know of...

 

Don't worry about it, if you are picky about it, take the "void warranty" sticker off. This way, the company can not say "you broke the sticker" (technically, you didn't 😛 )

This isn’t a computer, it’s on a nvme drive. 

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Aokromes    216
5 hours ago, zhangm said:

Due to falling NVMe drive prices, I've been doing a few upgrades lately. I couldn't help but notice that the ones I received are decorated with a "Warranty void if removed" sticker glued right onto the memory chips. Are these stickers still legal (or were they ever, and other shady warranty caveats like requiring registration)? IIRC the FTC recently started reminding a limited set of hardware manufacturers that they had to remove this stipulation from their warranties. Basically, is it safe to just remove the sticker?

depends on the country where you live.

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PNWDweller    147

I used to work for a company that didn't have stickers on them to prevent opening.  There were no warnings about voiding the warranting if you opened up the case.  There was a problem with a switch getting stuck in one position.   People would get in there and replace it instead if sending it in for repair.    They had a way of knowing if someone opened the case, even to look inside.   The bottom feet were rubber and covered the screw holes.  They had a clear cover on them that would crease if you flexed it to get to the screws inside.

 

 

 

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zhangm    1,332
3 hours ago, PNWDweller said:

I used to work for a company that didn't have stickers on them to prevent opening.  There were no warnings about voiding the warranting if you opened up the case.  There was a problem with a switch getting stuck in one position.   People would get in there and replace it instead if sending it in for repair.    They had a way of knowing if someone opened the case, even to look inside.   The bottom feet were rubber and covered the screw holes.  They had a clear cover on them that would crease if you flexed it to get to the screws inside.

I wonder whether designing and implementing that system, validating that it works (and no false positives), and then training workers to check for it really is worth it in the end.

3 hours ago, Aokromes said:

depends on the country where you live.

US. Though I'm curious as well how things are in EU and Canada.

 

7 hours ago, shockz said:

Why do you need to pull a sticker off an nvme anyways? Mine sits under the motherboard, and even if it didn't it's not like I'd be starting at it all the time. Even with a clear case...

I don't have a need to remove it. I saw it and it made me wonder whether there's actually a legal basis for voiding the warranty, or whether it's just a complete waste of a sticker.

 

4 hours ago, DevTech said:

 

Modern NVMe drives can get very hot if being used for useful computing tasks.

 

The drive is smart enough to throttle back to avoid damage so a heatsink is very valuable to maintain speed for a top-end drive that is actually being used for something other than checking Facebook status...

 

 

A Precision 5530. Not sure a normal heat sink could make a difference for sustained operations. Could be interesting with a pad that thermally connects it to the metal chassis though.

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Mindovermaster    1,725
5 hours ago, adrynalyne said:

This isn’t a computer, it’s on a nvme drive. 

Umm, I never said "computer", might have got that confused with "company"

 

Also, all hardware is technically a "computer part". So in a sense, it is, no?

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adrynalyne    11,189
3 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

Umm, I never said "computer", might have got that confused with "company"

 

Also, all hardware is technically a "computer part". So in a sense, it is, no?

Correct, I misread and no a computer part is not a computer.

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Mindovermaster    1,725
9 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

Correct, I misread and no a computer part is not a computer.

Was just playing with the words. Yeah, I know. ;)

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+DevTech    1,495
1 hour ago, zhangm said:

A Precision 5530. Not sure a normal heat sink could make a difference for sustained operations. Could be interesting with a pad that thermally connects it to the metal chassis though.

Yes, it is always hard to predict cooling models and airflow.

 

I don't know if in all cases the thin metal plate that is provided as a "heatsink" for the NVMe will be effective. What exactly is the thermal properties of the "pad material" attached to it, etc.

 

But assuming a good thermal contact to the chips, then the metal is going to radiate much better than the plastic chips.

 

As you have pointed out, in a tight enclosed space without airflow, the temperature reduction cannot be better than the temperature of the chips compared to the internal ambient.

 

Those thoughts annoyed me enough that for my Dell XPS 9550 which has zero space inside, I just took my drill and punched a bunch of holes in the bottom case right where the NVMe drive is located.

 

 

 

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Aokromes    216
6 hours ago, zhangm said:

US. Though I'm curious as well how things are in EU and Canada.

no legislation at all on European Union.

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