Drug trial (accidentally) reverses biological aging during a study ...


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Unobscured Vision

DRUG TRIAL REVERSES BIOLOGICAL AGING AS SUBJECTS REGAIN 2 YEARS OF YOUTH ON AVERAGE

 

Article link (Newsweek) | Second article link (Nature) | Newsweek.com Website | Nature Website

 

Quote

Scientists believe it may be possible to reverse a person's biological age with a combination of drugs and growth hormones, based on evidence presented in the results of a small clinical study.

 

The study, which was conducted by geneticist Steve Horvath at the University of California, Los Angeles, effectively reversed participants' epigenetic clock by an average of two and a half years, the scientific journal Nature reported. Additionally, the patients' immune systems appeared to rejuvenate after treatment with the combination of growth hormone and two diabetes medications.

 

Even the scientists who worked on the study were surprised by the results. At the same time, some are urging caution as the results are still preliminary.

 

"I'd expected to see slowing down of the clock, but not a reversal," Horvath told Nature. "That felt kind of futuristic."

 

(Read the rest of the articles at the two sites above. WELL worth reading.)

Well, this could be huge ... I'm taking the "wait and see" position here.

 

IF valid (and that's a BIG "IF"), they're going to have to proceed VERY carefully. The study was done in 2015 so I can only assume they're well into planning that second clinical trial by now if it's not already underway.

 

What I believe the testing methodology is going to be looking at:

 

- Age ranges upwards into the 80's and older (if possible) to determine the benefits and yes the hazards (and if it even works on subjects of that age)

- Not limiting the subjects to being Caucasian .... (seriously ...)

- Physical fitness level (because it WILL come into play), including what effect lifestyle changes have upon the participants versus a control group, etc.

- Dose level modifications (whether the beneficial effects can be increased/sped up) or if there are diminishing returns, minimal effective doses, etc.

- Combination therapy with caloric restriction (which has been shown to improve and reverse Type 2 Diabetes to a latent but non-effectual state)

- Does Neuroplasticity return to it's early- and mid-twenties level if a participant has been physiologically age-regressed to that age after previously being rather dormant due to age?

- Can age-related diseases like Dementia and Alzheimer's actually BE reversed using this method, or will there be more required than simply this treatment? (I'd say more required but on the right track)

How far can the "epigenetic clock" potentially be reversed and is it safe to do so, or are there complications that arise (and can they be managed)

Other issues not expected by the Researchers that can occur.

 

That's definitely not an exhaustive list but that's what comes to mind when I think of what they'll be looking for in the second study.

 

Your thoughts, folks?

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+Dick Montage

Heard this many times before. And then it gets debunked.

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Unobscured Vision
16 hours ago, Human.Online said:

Heard this many times before. And then it gets debunked.

That's what the studies are for. To prove or disprove.

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+warwagon

So that's what they were using my DNA for... I was wondering. :D

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Matthew S.
15 hours ago, warwagon said:

So that's what they were using my DNA for... I was wondering. :D

Wouldn't your DNA have caused aging then? 😛 

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+warwagon
1 hour ago, Matthew S. said:

Wouldn't your DNA have caused aging then? 😛 

It Reverses it! Makes them look younger!!

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