Western Digital or Seagate?


Western Digital or Seagate?  

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Gerowen

After a recent drive failure I am in need of a replacement 12TB drive for my home server.  Which manufacturer, in your experience, makes a more reliable product for spinning metal mass storage?

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SnoopZ

Most people say WD are better.

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Skyfrog

I've never had any brand fail personally but from what I've read WD usually seems to be more reliable. I use WD Reds for my NAS, been doing great for many years now.

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AndyMutz

from my personal experience.. I would choose Seagate.

I had failed drives from both companies, but while my Seagates had only bad sectors after some time, I had two WDs completely die on me, without the possibility of any data rescue.

 

 -andy-

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Mindovermaster

Buy whatever is cheaper, bro. Just don't go with a 5400rpm to save money.

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Jim K
7 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

Buy whatever is cheaper, bro. Just don't go with a 5400rpm to save money.

Unless his "server" is a NAS and used primarily for storage....in which case a 5400 doesn't really matter.

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Gerowen
11 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

Buy whatever is cheaper, bro. Just don't go with a 5400rpm to save money.

I always go with 7200RPM, 🙂

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Mindovermaster
1 hour ago, Jim K said:

Unless his "server" is a NAS and used primarily for storage....in which case a 5400 doesn't really matter.

Yeah, some peoplke would bash you, though... Not everyone believes that. But seeing you have experience, /shrug

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Harpo

I prefer 5400 for a NAS. There's a good reason that WD Red drives are 5400 RPM. They run cooler, quieter, use less power and last longer.

For a media server the slower speed makes absolutely no difference anyway, it's more than fast enough to stream HD content.

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Brandon H

from my experience WD has better internal drives but Seagate does better with external/portable drives

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+BudMan

So how big was this drive that failed?  Was it also a 12? Or you looking to just increase size since you other drive failed?  I take it you didn't loose any data - because you had it backed up?  Is this drive you need to replace in an array/pool?

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Gerowen
1 hour ago, BudMan said:

So how big was this drive that failed?  Was it also a 12? Or you looking to just increase size since you other drive failed?  I take it you didn't loose any data - because you had it backed up?  Is this drive you need to replace in an array/pool?

The drive that failed was part of a RAID 1 array. No data was lost because I have both a backup, and because it was RAID1.

 

The replacement drive will simply get added to the array in place of the failed drive.

 

I just thought it was odd that a drive with a 5 year warranty lasted less than 2 so I was wondering if maybe I had a one off bad experience and wanted some input from the community.

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Mindovermaster
26 minutes ago, Gerowen said:

The drive that failed was part of a RAID 1 array. No data was lost because I have both a backup, and because it was RAID1.

 

The replacement drive will simply get added to the array in place of the failed drive.

 

I just thought it was odd that a drive with a 5 year warranty lasted less than 2 so I was wondering if maybe I had a one off bad experience and wanted some input from the community.

RAID is not a backup. Words from BudMan.

 

If it is still under warranty, why not RMA it? You'll get a new one for free (minush the shipping)

 

And any electrivcal device can fail at any time. There's no guarantee that "xyz will live # years long" Same with people...

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PGHammer
7 hours ago, SnoopZ said:

Most people say WD are better.

I refuse to recommend a Seagate drive for ANY use - on the other hand, I've recommended (and even used) WD Eco-Green drives for everyday desktop use (despite that normally WD Blue or Black drives are WD's own choice for such use).  (My own desktop has an ex-MyBook 2 TB Eco-Green as its primary drive; my Mom has an even bigger (3 TB) Eco-Green that she bought from Amazon earlier this year.)

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bikeman25

I have 90 percent Western Digital Drives at least for my Gaming Desktop-- Western Digtial Blue 250GB SSD,  Western Digital 1tb storage drive (internal) (black drive),  Western Digital My Passport external,  Western Digital Elements 500gb,  and 1 Seagate 8tb Drive that I won in a contest months back,  configured in enclosure enclosure as External as had no more room internal wise.     Overall all drives perform perfectly fine,  soon doing another system backup prior to Patch Tuesday on the 12th of November.     

 

I've had Seagate internal drives over the years as well,  did have one of those fail many years ago, but might've been my fault not sure anymore lol

 

 

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Gerowen
31 minutes ago, Mindovermaster said:

RAID is not a backup. Words from BudMan.

 

If it is still under warranty, why not RMA it? You'll get a new one for free (minush the shipping)

 

And any electrivcal device can fail at any time. There's no guarantee that "xyz will live # years long" Same with people...

I have a backup besides the fact that it was RAID 1.  I tried to start an RMA on it but the Western Digital site said it was not eligible for warranty, even though I bought it brand new and the manufacture date on the label was 6 May of last year, which is well within their stated 5 year warranty period.  I've sent their customer support an email, but I'm planning for the worst and assuming that I'll have to pony up the cash to replace it myself.

 

Plan for the worst, hope for the best I guess.

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Mindovermaster
23 minutes ago, Gerowen said:

I have a backup besides the fact that it was RAID 1.  I tried to start an RMA on it but the Western Digital site said it was not eligible for warranty, even though I bought it brand new and the manufacture date on the label was 6 May of last year, which is well within their stated 5 year warranty period.  I've sent their customer support an email, but I'm planning for the worst and assuming that I'll have to pony up the cash to replace it myself.

 

Plan for the worst, hope for the best I guess.

Try calling them. They can help you. I once RMAd a HDD that was out of warranty. So they aren't all picky about that. ;)

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+LostCat

Larger drives have a higher failure rate by default, so just asking random people which is better probably won't help much.

 

There's Backblaze reliability stats but their workload and yours may be very different (and they don't seem to have WD drives currently in use.)  Still, does paint a big question mark on Seagate 12TB drives.

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Mindovermaster
10 minutes ago, LostCat said:

Larger drives have a higher failure rate by default, so just asking random people which is better probably won't help much.

 

There's Backblaze reliability stats but their workload and yours may be very different (and they don't seem to have WD drives currently in use.)  Still, does paint a big question mark on Seagate 12TB drives.

Well, just because they are newer...

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+BudMan

So a while it can work with different makers.. To be honest if your in a mirror.. Prob best idea to be the same drives.. So I would replace the drive with the same..

 

If your only 2 years into your warranty... Then yes you should be able to RMA it.. Is it fully dead - can not access it, or did the raid controller just say it was bad?  Have you run their software tests on it, extended smart test.. You can not rma it with out running their software tests on it that is for sure.  Unless its just fully dead..

 

Its not a drive you shucked is it?  If so then yeah your warranty is out the window.

 

And yes will say it again, your raid array while it saved you from a drive failure - is not a backup.  I this data is critical, I sure hope you have an actual backup..

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+trag3dy
15 hours ago, Gerowen said:

I always go with 7200RPM, 🙂

A WD black drive that is only going to be used for storage is a waste of money. The cost difference between a 6tb blue and black is about $100, give or take a few dollars. All for no real purpose.

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hellowalkman

Between the two, WD has the lower failure rate, but Toshiba has been making great progress and currently they have the least failure rate so might want to consider Toshiba as well.

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Gerowen
5 hours ago, BudMan said:

So a while it can work with different makers.. To be honest if your in a mirror.. Prob best idea to be the same drives.. So I would replace the drive with the same..

 

If your only 2 years into your warranty... Then yes you should be able to RMA it.. Is it fully dead - can not access it, or did the raid controller just say it was bad?  Have you run their software tests on it, extended smart test.. You can not rma it with out running their software tests on it that is for sure.  Unless its just fully dead..

 

Its not a drive you shucked is it?  If so then yeah your warranty is out the window.

 

And yes will say it again, your raid array while it saved you from a drive failure - is not a backup.  I this data is critical, I sure hope you have an actual backup..

It just has a metric assload of dead sectors.  I noticed Nextcloud and Plex were not responding one evening even after restarting the services, and upon reboot the array was failing to mount altogether.  I could hear the drive making a repetitive clicking noise, kinda like when a read head goes bad.  I removed the drive, put the array in a degraded state with the remaining drive and everything started working correctly.  I stuck the drive in another PC and it continued making that repetitive clicking noise for 5 or 10 minutes when it just miraculously stopped.  All of a sudden I could format it, create a partition, etc (the old partition data was not visible, the drive just showed up as unknown)., but when I tried running manual SMART self tests it failed them.

 

The drive was purchased new in box (a Western Digital Gold), and was not shucked out of an external enclosure or anything like that.

 

I do have an actual backup besides the fact that it was RAID.

 

I set up the RAID 1 to be a specific number of sectors, leaving about 1GB free at the end of the drive, to account for variances in drive capacity in the event that I ever had to replace one of the drives and the capacity was not exactly the same, but I agree, going with the same type of drive would be easier.

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+BudMan

Well if its failing smart - you should have zero issues doing a RMA.. There is code that will be given when you run their software test that you use for submitting the rma..

 

Did you follow the instructions

https://support-en.wd.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/25679

Step-by-Step Instructions to Create an RMA

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