Boeing Starliner Orbital Flight Test (OFT)


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LaP
2 hours ago, ks8877 said:

They said: "Per Boeing's Jim Chilton, the "mission elapsed timer" on the Starliner spacecraft was 11 hours off."...

It looks like Boeing's software programmers works in India and use Time Zone of India...

That would be epic XD

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Jim K

Oddly enough it is an 11 hour difference between Florida and the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

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DocM
6 hours ago, ks8877 said:

They said: "Per Boeing's Jim Chilton, the "mission elapsed timer" on the Starliner spacecraft was 11 hours off."...

It looks like Boeing's software programmers works in India and use Time Zone of India...

 

The Atlas V powers up at about T-10/11 hours, with prop load starting at about T-6 hours. Wouldn't surprise me if Atlas V's  power-up is  the wrong data read by Starliner.

 

Also, in November it was reported this was the first time Atlas V shared data with a payload.  Sounds like they botched it.

 

SpaceFlightNow...

 

Quote


"Electrically, one of the unique things about this mission is that the launch vehicle and spacecraft are going to be talking to each other," Weiss said in a recent interview. "We normally don't have that. They will be sharing data throughout (the) flight."

Edited by DocM
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  • 4 weeks later...
IsItPluggedIn

Hey Guys,

 

Have we heard if NASA has made any decisions about making Boeing redo the OFT?

 

Do we think they were waiting for the SpaceX test to make their decision?

 

I did some searching but could only find that they were still thinking about it.

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DocM

The next Starliner review is about March and should take weeks. They have a lot of work to do after the hot mess called OFT.

 

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Unobscured Vision

OH that's bad. An entire branch going offline ... oof. :no: 

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Jim K

Boeing is not having a very good day.

 

They also said today that the 737-Max won't RTF until at least mid-year.

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DocM

Going paper & simulations first vs. flying real hardware early is biting them in the ass, big-time.

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bguy_1986
2 hours ago, DocM said:

Going paper & simulations first vs. flying real hardware early is biting them in the ass, big-time.

The simulations weren't even that good compared to what SpaceX has done/is doing are they? ---- I might be getting confused with reading a bunch of comments somewhere else when they had the clock issue and why that never showed up in a simulation.

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