• 0

My internet is slow over powerline Adapters


Question

sikhwarrior

Hi all, as the title suggests I am getting awful internet speeds while using my powerline adapters. I have been quoted upto 500Mbps and when I do a speedtest from the router, I get around 450Mbps ish.  When I use my computer which is upstairs over the powerline, I hit roughly 20-40Mbps. Wireless I get a bit better around 200ish depending on the device. The reason why I want to use wired, is because there are too many devices on wifi and I would like to use a lot more bandwidth while streaming or gaming. 

 

My question is, what could be the cause of this? I have tried different plugs and cables but no change.  Any suggestions on what else I could try? The powerline adapters that I am using are TP-link  model number:TP-PA511

 

image.thumb.png.9c4a07c12c4f00e307d5f7d83335abe4.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

16 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0
Sulphy

It could just be down to the wiring in your house, especially if it is an older house! I have the same issue, not much i can do without rewiring everything.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
Brandon H

powerline adapters, while nice, are luck of the draw. They're completely dependent on how good the wiring is in the building.

 

There are several factors such as how long a distance it has to travel on the wire (if they're on the same wiring juncture etc.), how old the wiring is, what grade of wires are used, etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
sikhwarrior

well I have been living in this house for 8 years and judging by where the sockets are positioned, I guess they are easily over 30 years old. I don't really want to use WI-FI but looks like I might have to invest in some powerline adapaters with WI-FI. A year ago the same powerline had been giving me anywhere between 250Mbps to 368Mbps with Virgin media as my ISP. Strange how in a year the speeds have dropped a lot 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
+spikey_richie
37 minutes ago, sikhwarrior said:

Strange how in a year the speeds have dropped a lot 

It could be that other devices that are connected to the mains supply are causing noise/interference, which is adversely impacting your speed. You could try unplugging anything unnecessary which is on the same ring as the powerline adapters, and see if the speed improves. Also, make sure you're not using a multi socket. They work best when plugged straight into a wall outlet.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
Brandon H
41 minutes ago, sikhwarrior said:

well I have been living in this house for 8 years and judging by where the sockets are positioned, I guess they are easily over 30 years old. I don't really want to use WI-FI but looks like I might have to invest in some powerline adapaters with WI-FI. A year ago the same powerline had been giving me anywhere between 250Mbps to 368Mbps with Virgin media as my ISP. Strange how in a year the speeds have dropped a lot 

how long have you had the same powerline adapters? from personal experience I can say they don't generally have the best longevity. When I was in a townhome I used them for my room when the router was on the other side of the house and they would work well but generally burnt out after a year or slightly longer of use and I would have to replace them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
sikhwarrior
45 minutes ago, spikey_richie said:

It could be that other devices that are connected to the mains supply are causing noise/interference, which is adversely impacting your speed. You could try unplugging anything unnecessary which is on the same ring as the powerline adapters, and see if the speed improves. Also, make sure you're not using a multi socket. They work best when plugged straight into a wall outlet.

Just moved both powerline to their own sockets and I am getting around. Will finally try in the same room to see if that has any

 

 

47 minutes ago, Brandon H said:

how long have you had the same powerline adapters? from personal experience I can say they don't generally have the best longevity. When I was in a townhome I used them for my room when the router was on the other side of the house and they would work well but generally burnt out after a year or slightly longer of use and I would have to replace them.

I have had these powerlines for around 5/6 years now. I am looking at newer ones TP-link. I have got a few cat 5e cables that I am using so might just bite the bullet and just get new powerline adapters.    

image.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
Brandon H
Just now, sikhwarrior said:

I have had these powerlines for around 5/6 years now. I am looking at newer ones TP-link. I have got a few cat 5e cables that I am using so might just bite the bullet and just get new powerline adapters.    

oh yeah then a new set may help; that set might just be on its last legs and is getting ready to burn out all together.

 

worth a shot at least considering powerline adapters aren't too terribly expensive :) 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
helpifIcan

Just in case you haven't tried yet remove both of them and swap them sounds silly but you never know. If they have a any setup I would also go back to factory default and see if that helps.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
sikhwarrior

An update to my issue, I received my new powerline adapters  and installed the tp link software, the software reported that the line can handle 315Mbps. I spoke with my ISP who said it sounds like a router issue and are sending me a new one. Next stage is waiting for the new router from my ISP to come and see if that helps. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
+BudMan

The best way to test the speed of powerline adapters is iperf with server on 1 end of powerline adapter A, and client on other side of adapter B..

 

This came up many moons ago, and yeah comes up every so often again - The thread from years ago was part of the reason I started compiling iperf3 for windows and posting it here whenever it updates..

 

 

As stated powerline adapters can be hit or miss.. If while connected to the router you see full speed, but through the powerline you do not - how does that make any sense that its your routers issue?  Your isp sending you a new router is unlikely to solve the problem if your seeing full speed you pay for via connection to the router.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
Superuser
On 11/12/2020 at 14:10, sikhwarrior said:

An update to my issue, I received my new powerline adapters  and installed the tp link software, the software reported that the line can handle 315Mbps. I spoke with my ISP who said it sounds like a router issue and are sending me a new one. Next stage is waiting for the new router from my ISP to come and see if that helps. 

Why are you wasting your time with this? Throw out the powerline apapters and either upgrade your WiFi access point (consider a mesh setup) or run Ethernet cable.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
+BudMan
50 minutes ago, Superuser said:

or run Ethernet cable.

That would be the correct solution to be honest ;)  Powerlines are always a MacGyver sort of solution if you ask me..  Running actual wire is going to give you best results.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
Superuser
33 minutes ago, BudMan said:

That would be the correct solution to be honest ;)  Powerlines are always a MacGyver sort of solution if you ask me..  Running actual wire is going to give you best results.

Yeah, I don't get it... A good WiFi setup would be better than powerline adapters in most cases.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
+BudMan

Depends on what your doing.. powerline can be very stable and when working correctly have very little jitter compared to wireless.

 

They can be a solution when a wire can not be run.. Or can not be used.. I had to use them in my son's new place.. He wanted to setup a hdhomerun which has no wireless only wired.  He had no wire where he needed to put it to be able to connect it to an antenna without a lot of work.  Either running a wire for ethernet, or for running an antenna to where he could connect it with a wire.

 

It doesn't need a lot of bandwidth..  So could of setup some sort of wireless bridge device as one solution.. But to be honest the powerline was easier solution.  If it had not worked, would of needed to either run a wire.  Possible maybe to leverage moca, since he has it in the area.  And if bandwidth would of been needed - might have gone that route.

 

But the powerline was a simple/reasonable priced - hey macgyver how you going to get out this one.. You have paperclip and some chewing gum ;)

 

They really have zero setup, at most you push a button on them..  They are no brainer to understand.. What goes in this one - comes out the other one ;)

 

I don't think they should ever be considered a first choice option..  But they do have use cases for sure.   Setting up a mesh network sure could be option - but most decent mesh networks are not all that cheap..  If how your house is wired doesn't allow them to function at a decent speed/reliability then you just return them and try another option.. My son was getting 80mbps on some of the testing I did - which is more than enough for him to stream some live tv from his hdhomerun device.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
sikhwarrior
On 24/12/2020 at 16:20, BudMan said:

Depends on what your doing.. powerline can be very stable and when working correctly have very little jitter compared to wireless.

 

They can be a solution when a wire can not be run.. Or can not be used.. I had to use them in my son's new place.. He wanted to setup a hdhomerun which has no wireless only wired.  He had no wire where he needed to put it to be able to connect it to an antenna without a lot of work.  Either running a wire for ethernet, or for running an antenna to where he could connect it with a wire.

 

It doesn't need a lot of bandwidth..  So could of setup some sort of wireless bridge device as one solution.. But to be honest the powerline was easier solution.  If it had not worked, would of needed to either run a wire.  Possible maybe to leverage moca, since he has it in the area.  And if bandwidth would of been needed - might have gone that route.

 

But the powerline was a simple/reasonable priced - hey macgyver how you going to get out this one.. You have paperclip and some chewing gum ;)

 

They really have zero setup, at most you push a button on them..  They are no brainer to understand.. What goes in this one - comes out the other one ;)

 

I don't think they should ever be considered a first choice option..  But they do have use cases for sure.   Setting up a mesh network sure could be option - but most decent mesh networks are not all that cheap..  If how your house is wired doesn't allow them to function at a decent speed/reliability then you just return them and try another option.. My son was getting 80mbps on some of the testing I did - which is more than enough for him to stream some live tv from his hdhomerun device.

 

 

For me, I just wanted low latency while gaming. I will be upgrading the Wi-Fi system as it does seem to be a lot better than having too many wires everywhere. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
+BudMan
1 hour ago, sikhwarrior said:

than having too many wires everywhere. 

You don't lay them across the floor ;)

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Barney T.
      This topic is for the placement of links to how-to articles, tips, FAQs, or helpful information related to internet, network, and security. Please post links to the actual articles.
       
      Internet Basics
       
      Test Your connection speed! Alternate connection speed test  
       
      Networking Basics
       
      What is a good network configuration?  
       
      Security Basics
       
      http://www.us-cert.gov/ http://osvdb.org/ http://www.sans.org/ http://nvd.nist.gov/ http://cve.mitre.org/  
             Security Tools
       
      http://nmap.org/ http://www.tenable.com/products/nessus http://ettercap.github.io/ettercap/ http://www.wireshark.org/          Security Tools for basic users:
       
      http://technet.microsoft.com/en-US/security/cc184924.aspx http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=39273  
       
      FAQ's
    • By EVJOHN
      Having just moved house, I noticed the wifi in my study was patchy. I therefore invested in a TP Link Powerline (TL-WPA4220) to run from my router to my study.
       
      It works perfectly on all my personal devices (Windows, Apple, Android etc) with them all getting the full wifi speeds promised by my ISP (Vodafone), both over wifi and ethernet. 
       
      The main reason I installed this, however, was for a fast reliable connection to my work computer. But whether via wifi or ethernet I'm getting much slower speeds on my work laptop than my personal devices connected to the same powerline - even slower than before I installed it when I was working at the far edge of my router's range. I'll be getting 70mbps download and 25mbps upload speeds on my personal devices and 2mbps download and 5mbps upload on my work computer.
       
      I called my work IT, they suggested my ISP was throttling my use (when testing the connection on my work laptop we found that when I connected to my ISPs network / server the speed was as expected, but any other server was very slugglish, which led them to think this).
       
      I contacted by ISP who insist they're not throttling my use and it must be something to do with my employer's IT policy. They did give me a static IP address suggesting this might help (but it hasn't).
       
      Any ideas why this might be happening?My main suspicoion is that it's something to do with the VPN on my work laptop (zscaler), although when I tried installing a VPN on my own persional laptop it had no effect on speeds. How could my laptop / VPN even recognise that my internet is coming from a different source? Are there any known issues with powerlines accessing secure VPN networks?
       
      I'm being bounced around to different people none of whom have a clue, so any advice would be gratefully received!
    • By dipsylalapo
      Hey everyone, 
       
      I haven't touched my network setup in a long time as it's been working with no issues for months. 
       
      Over the last week or so, I've noticed that some devices struggle to stay connected to the network. At the moment, there's a Kindle and a desktop that are struggling to stay connected. 
       
      I've no idea where to start looking into this so any pointers would be great!
       
      I have a USG, two Unifi APs (Lite) and a D-Link switch (DGS-1100-08P).
    • By News Staff
      Get the Ultimate Cybersecurity Certification Bundle for only $39.99
      by Steven Parker



      Today's highlighted deal comes via our Online Courses section of the Neowin Deals store, where you can save 52% off the Ultimate Cybersecurity Certification Bundle. Your 28-hour roadmap as an ultimate security professional — Master network monitoring, PenTesting, and routing techniques and vulnerabilities.

      What's the deal?
      This deal consists of the following courses:

      Parsing TCP Socket Data with C/C++
      Understand Socket Programming & Build Apps in Your Network or Internet Introduction of C++ Sockets
      Learn the Most Fundamental & Practical IT Communications & Develop Your Own Socket Apps How Hackers Find SQL Injections in Minutes with Sqlmap
      Effectively Detect & Exploit SQL Injection Vulnerabilities — Ideal for Penetration Testers, Ethical Hackers, Bug Hunters, and More How Web Hackers Make Big Money: Remote Code Execution
      Become a Succesful RCE Hunter with 1-Hour Crash Course from Top Hacker Dawid Czagan Double Your Web Hacking Rewards with Fuzzing
      Learn the Vulnerability Detection Technique Used by Many Successful Hackers & Make Money in Bug Bounty Programs Practical Blockchain & Smart Contracts: Ethereum and Solidity
      Implement Blockchain in Your Software Projects & Upcoming Project Ideas CCNP Routing & Switching ROUTE300-101
      Join the Professional World of Cisco Systems & Gain a Higher Level of Routing Competence Setting up Nagios 4 Monitoring
      Set Up a Monitoring Console Showing the Health of Multiple Remote Servers The Ethical Hacking MasterClass
      Perform Advanced Penetration Testing, Exploit Vulnerable Systems & Patch Them Good to know
      Length of access: lifetime Certification of completion included Redemption deadline: redeem your code within 30 days of purchase For full descriptions, terms, and instructor info please click here.

      What's the benefit?
      This Ultimate Cybersecurity Certification Bundle normally costs $84.91 but it can be yours for just $39.99 for a limited time, that's a saving of $44.92 (54%) off!

      >> Get this deal, or learn more about it <<
      See all Online Courses on offer, This is a time-limited deal, ending soon!
      Get $1 credit for every $25 spent · Give $10, Get $10 · 10% off for first-time buyers.

      Not for you?
      If this offer doesn't interest you, why not check out the following offers:

      The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 256GB Giveaway 20% off Ivacy VPN subscription with coupon code IVACY20 NordVPN subscription at up to 70% off Private Internet Access VPN subscription at up to 71% off Unlocator VPN or SmartDNS unblock Geoblock with 7-day free trial Disable Sponsored posts · Other recent deals · Preferred partner software

      Disclosure: This is a StackCommerce deal or giveaway in partnership with Neowin; an account at StackCommerce is required to participate in any deals or giveaways. For a full description of StackCommerce's privacy guidelines, go here. Neowin benefits from shared revenue of each sale made through our branded deals site, and it all goes toward the running costs.

    • By zikalify
      EE will be the exclusive carrier of the new Motorola Razr in the UK
      by Paul Hill

      EE has announced that the new Motorola Razr will be exclusively stocked online and in its stores following a partnership with Motorola. The new Motorola Razr is a callback to the Motorola Razr from the 2000s which was a very popular flip phone. The new version also incorporates a flip design in order to house a 6.2-inch Flex View display.

      Aside from the big display on the inside of the phone, there’s also an external 2.7-inch Quick View display where you can access important information. The Quick View display allows you to make calls, reply to messages, pay with a tap, control your music, take selfies, use Google Assistant, and access some settings such as turning on Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, a Hotspot, and more.



      Commenting on the news, Sharon Meadows, Director of Devices, Partnerships & Business Development at EE, said:

      The Motorola Razr is due to launch in January 2020 for $1,500 (£1,170). EE has not announced the plans which it will sell this device on but the price announced by Motorola suggests that the plans will be pricey.