Would you rather Live in California or Alaska


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Would you rather Live in California or Alaska   

28 members have voted

  1. 1. Which do you prefer and why?

    • California
      12
    • Alaska
      12


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Is there a reason for the question?

Am I guaranteed a job and roof over my head in both locations?

Is there an option to stay where I am instead of choosing either?

 

It seems quite a limited question, and I haven't been to either place before so I'm not sure. I'd choose Alaska because it's remote, I guess? I'm also not one for really hot weather.

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Alaska...by far.   CA cities are a mess like San Fran and it seems the are pushing more and more people out with high taxes.  Need to be either rich, or poor, to live in CA.

 

Alaska...less crowded, cleaner air, open landscape, and better scenery

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10 minutes ago, techbeck said:

Alaska...by far.   CA cities are a mess like San Fran and it seems the are pushing more and more people out with high taxes.  Need to be either rich, or poor, to live in CA.

 

Alaska...less crowded, cleaner air, open landscape, and better scenery

I could not have said it better myself.

 

If I chose CA, it would definitely be the northern most part.  Google Northern CA, it speaks for itself.

 

I had a customer service job years back that required me to telephone people in California. The following is an approximation and average: Anyone from San Francisco south,  the people were mostly rude and a bit nutty. Anyone north of San Fran the people were pleasant and realistic. 

 

I'm not saying all people in these areas are what I experienced. Only speaking of a majority. 

 

 

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There are other things to consider b/w the two states. CA is beautiful, as is Alaska. CA has the pacific coast, huge mountains, national parks, desert. it's amazing.

 

unfortunately, CA suffers from wildly progressive politics, a huge homeless problem. San Fran is overrun with homeless people defecating in the street. CA's taxes are some of the highest in the country. The cost of living in most of the state is some of the highest in the country, as well.

 

Conversely, AK is far more conservative. They have more of a liberty-based lifestyle. However, the population is so small, and the cities so far apart, that it would probably bother me quite a bit. The long winters and short summers would get annoying. Plus, a flight to any other part of the world takes forever.

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I've lived in southern California three times and I've had enough. I'd try Alaska.

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If I only had the two choices, I would say Alaska. California is too overcrowded for my liking, and that combined with all the other BS that is happening right now, I would say Alaska is a better location.

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I loved spending time in Alaska.   California, not so much, and it's been years since i've been there, so it sounds even worse.

 

I haven't seen anyone that voted for california speak up about why they chose that location.

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16 minutes ago, Buttus said:

I loved spending time in Alaska.   California, not so much, and it's been years since i've been there, so it sounds even worse.

 

I haven't seen anyone that voted for california speak up about why they chose that location.

Well here ya go then.

 

I currently live here in Southern Cali (Nearish San Diego). I've visited 40 other states, including Alaska, and nowhere except maybe Hawaii has decent surf, good food (There is good food elsewhere, but nowhere has the mix of the two).

Is it crowded here? Yeah definitely more than when I was a kid but lets be clear here, Cali is more than just San Fran. Southern Cali is quite different from northern Cali. A lot of the complaints listed so far are not valid here.

 

Homeless problem? I guess if 2-3 that I see once a week is a huge problem. In LA there is a problem, but its like you have to go looking for it, its not like there are just homeless people strewn 'round the streets willy nilly. Same in San Diego you go looking of course you will find homeless, but on a normal average day, no.

 

Taxes? Cost of living? Well, the taxes I don't care about because they do a pretty good job on roads, I've got good clean water, schools here are good, and Id pay 2x this rate to see the ocean daily. Same with the cost of living, I suck it up knowing I've got ocean in front of me, snowy mtn behind me, and desert in between. All within 2hr drive.

 

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  • 1 month later...

Alaska. It's easier to warm up by adding layers. It's hard to cool down in heat, and I've lived in SoCal for 2 years already; it was too hot for me.

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