Are you getting vaccinated, or have been?


Do you plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19?  

142 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19?

    • I have already been vaccinated
      103
    • I want to get vaccinated but haven't yet
      18
    • I refuse to get vaccinated
      16


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6 hours ago, cmcgregor80 said:

Who are you waiting to approve? FDA already approved both of them months ago.  This was in december

An emergency use authorization is NOT even close to to same as an approved drug. Phizer has just started their stage 4 testing for approval that may happen by later this year. What do you know, the FDA actually requires longer term safety testing in order to get approval. You do realize that if you are the one in a million that do suffer from an unforseen side effect that in the US, you have absolutely no legal recourse against the drug manufacturer, don't you?

 

Also consider that every other attempt at creating a coronavirus vaccine has resulted in a significant percent of recipients developing immune system issues 12 to 18 months downstream. 

 

In my case, I'm planning to get one (J&J) after that process is complete and the J&J gets approval. As I've said before, my wife and I are not putting anyone at risk. We don't travel, go to the theater, eat in restaurants or even work in an office. I grocery shop once a week and they just put my stuff in the trunk. We have zero personal contact with anyone. We live in a county that has just over a million people, a case fatality rate of .9% (most of those from several senior center group homes). Our hospitalization rate for those who develop covid is under 2%. Why should I rush out for an unapproved vaccine that offers me a 95% rate of not being hospitalized if I get covid when I already have a 98% chance of not being hospitalized?

 

If I had an in office job, wanted to get back to social gatherings, eat at my favorite restaurant or had famiky we planned to visit I'd likey have been vaccinated but for our lifestyle and location, there just isn't an urgent need.

 

That to me isn't a refusal but an informed and safe choice.

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Yes, I got two shots of Pfizer.

 

I got COVID before my age group (16-24) was eligible for the vaccine and had to go to the hospital.

 

If you can get the vaccine, get it ASAP.

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44 minutes ago, spy beef said:

No, I'm too scared of the microchips.

Bro, QAnon is bad for you.

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5 hours ago, Nick H. said:

Wow, really? Why so long between shots? Over here we have to wait 21 days (I think) between doses, but they seem to pretty much have you booked for your second dose the day after the wait time is up.

No idea. 

 

It was the earliest that I was able to book it. They're ramping up the rollout of the second dose because of the spread of the Indian variant so could be sooner. 

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Was meant to get vaccinated last week, but I managed to go and get myself infected the week before, so I'm not eligible for vaccination for 6 months. Going to try in 3 though as I have heard that that is possible. 

 

Luckily I wasn't too sick, but I wasn't asymptomatic either. Was basically like a normal case of the flu, but know people that had it much worse. My aunt was in hospital for 5 weeks and was a bit touch and go for a while.

On 29/05/2021 at 19:54, Biscuits Brown said:

An emergency use authorization is NOT even close to to same as an approved drug. Phizer has just started their stage 4 testing for approval that may happen by later this year. What do you know, the FDA actually requires longer term safety testing in order to get approval. You do realize that if you are the one in a million that do suffer from an unforseen side effect that in the US, you have absolutely no legal recourse against the drug manufacturer, don't you?

 

Also consider that every other attempt at creating a coronavirus vaccine has resulted in a significant percent of recipients developing immune system issues 12 to 18 months downstream. 

 

...

 

That to me isn't a refusal but an informed and safe choice.

wow, you really have no idea what you're talking about, do you.

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1 hour ago, illumination said:

Was meant to get vaccinated last week, but I managed to go and get myself infected the week before, so I'm not eligible for vaccination for 6 months. Going to try in 3 though as I have heard that that is possible. 

Forgive me if I am wrong, but if you caught COVID-19 you will now have the same sort of immunity that the vaccine is offering? That is also the reason they say you aren't eligiable for the vacine for 6 months, because you will already have the antibodies 😛 

 

It is a bit confusing to me, but I believe that until COVID-19 is no longer a pandemic, those that have been vaccinated will likely have to have another round of shots in a year.

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Posted (edited)

Getting it? no right now, not until long term side effects are studied... no I'm not saying I don't trust it, I just feel like in my situation I don't have an urgency to get it I work isolated all day, I don't interact with people and rarely go places that are crowded. I already had COVID back in December, and it was barely anything for me, not even a temp only found out because my wife got exposed by a coworker, nether of us had any symptoms. I also have a family history of having odd issues with some compounds used in some drugs, so that kind of makes me want to stay away until we have at least 2yrs of detailed knowledge on the drug. Emergency approval yeah great for people that really need it, but I trust science and science says things can change, hypothesizes can be altered and what we know can change over time. When it gets full approval like other drugs I'll be more comfortable, but even with full approval we find out years later what can really happen some stuff does take time to find out.

2 hours ago, illumination said:

Was meant to get vaccinated last week, but I managed to go and get myself infected the week before, so I'm not eligible for vaccination for 6 months. Going to try in 3 though as I have heard that that is possible. 

 

Luckily I wasn't too sick, but I wasn't asymptomatic either. Was basically like a normal case of the flu, but know people that had it much worse. My aunt was in hospital for 5 weeks and was a bit touch and go for a while.

wow, you really have no idea what you're talking about, do you.

not eligible for 6 months? huh? here they say if you had COVID still get the shot, where are you located? I'm in Pennsylvania in the USA and they are giving it to people that had it as recently as 2 weeks before (just to make sure they are over it first). The CDC only says wait 90 days if you where treated with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma for COVID.

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I got the first shot and the only side effect was a sore arm.

Two days later I got a new 5G phone.

A few weeks after that I got my second shot, and phone firmware update on the same day. My reception got much better and I had a sore arm with a mild headache. 

 

My only question is, if I got one vaccine, can I switch cell providers later on?

 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Steven P. said:

Forgive me if I am wrong, but if you caught COVID-19 you will now have the same sort of immunity that the vaccine is offering? That is also the reason they say you aren't eligiable for the vacine for 6 months, because you will already have the antibodies 😛 

 

The natural protection is not as long as those who have been vaccinated I believe. I heard that is roughly 3 to 8 months. 

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On 29/05/2021 at 10:54, Biscuits Brown said:

An emergency use authorization is NOT even close to to same as an approved drug.

This isn't true.  There are processes for FDA approval and the EUA is decided upon when the immediate public health concern overrides normal approval processes, as in our current pandemic.  However, "FDA approval" does not add to (or negate) the science, safety, and efficacy of the drug, which is why the J&J vaccine was immediately pulled based upon a blood clot reported issue, for example.  Any drug which might be sold or prescribed is immediately pulled at any point for issues found; J&J might have been pulled a year from now even with full "approval".  In order for any drug at all to be used, all manufacturers must prove safety and efficacy.  That bar has already been met in the case of the USA Covid-19 vaccines. 

 

The difference with "FDA approval" is that drug manufacturers have to follow a process which is very long, detailed, costly, and very bureaucratic, which ultimately allows the manufacturers to directly market their drugs to consumers.  It has no real difference in litigation, support, efficacy, etc.   This process takes a long time.  It costs a lot.  Not our concern, but it IS a concern when there is a world health crisis... and this is where the EUA comes in.  All it does is shortcut the time to market and the ability for the manufacturer to sell directly.   All the other requirements for use are met.  All of them.   There will be no further magic juju added to any vaccine approved for EUA between now and it's full approval, other than millions more people consuming it and further proving it is still safe, still supported, still effective.

 

The drug IS approved for use by the FDA in the scope of a public health crisis.   "FDA approval" only allows Pfizer (for example) to "sell" the vaccine 3 years from now when we don't have a current worldwide pandemic going on.   Or probably it' derivative boosters.  

 

EUA is most definitely equal to an approved drug, contextually.  It meets the exact same bars of supportability, efficacy, and safety. 

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22 minutes ago, mram said:

 

This isn't true.  There are processes for FDA approval and the EUA is decided upon when the immediate public health concern overrides normal approval processes, as in our current pandemic.  However, "FDA approval" does not add to (or negate) the science, safety, and efficacy of the drug, which is why the J&J vaccine was immediately pulled based upon a blood clot reported issue, for example.  Any drug which might be sold or prescribed is immediately pulled at any point for issues found; J&J might have been pulled a year from now even with full "approval".  In order for any drug at all to be used, all manufacturers must prove safety and efficacy.  That bar has already been met in the case of the USA Covid-19 vaccines. 

 

The difference with "FDA approval" is that drug manufacturers have to follow a process which is very long, detailed, costly, and very bureaucratic, which ultimately allows the manufacturers to directly market their drugs to consumers.  It has no real difference in litigation, support, efficacy, etc.   This process takes a long time.  It costs a lot.  Not our concern, but it IS a concern when there is a world health crisis... and this is where the EUA comes in.  All it does is shortcut the time to market and the ability for the manufacturer to sell directly.   All the other requirements for use are met.  All of them.   There will be no further magic juju added to any vaccine approved for EUA between now and it's full approval, other than millions more people consuming it and further proving it is still safe, still supported, still effective.

 

The drug IS approved for use by the FDA in the scope of a public health crisis.   "FDA approval" only allows Pfizer (for example) to "sell" the vaccine 3 years from now when we don't have a current worldwide pandemic going on.   Or probably it' derivative boosters.  

 

EUA is most definitely equal to an approved drug, contextually.  It meets the exact same bars of supportability, efficacy, and safety. 

 

Hey, if that works for you, cool. The multipage paperwork you should have received when you got the shot would disagree with you but no one bothers to read it. It clearly states you received and experimental treatment that was granted emergency use authorization, is not approved and by accepting the shot you understand the manufacturer is immune from civil or criminal action in the event you suffer any adverse effects. 

 

Once again, if you're vaccinated, why do you even care? I'm not a threat to you (or pretty much anyone). If what you took actually worked, you'd have nothing to worry about. I mean I've had my measles vaccine and don't fear those that choose not to get one because that vaccine works and has decades of data proving it. Why do so many people care if I get sick for a few days?

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, Biscuits Brown said:

once again, if you're vaccinated, why do you even care? I'm not a threat to you (or pretty much anyone).

Children (in my and many other countries) cannot be vaccinated. Neither can some elderly and the immune compromised. The risk (and why people care) is you could inadvertently kill people who are not able to, for one reason or another, have the vaccination. You say you don't go out, don't go to crowded areas, don't blah blah. And I call ######. Even the hermiest hermit is around people. No one goes to your house? You think it can't be transported on clothing? The apple you picked up and decided not to buy?

 

I'd say the difference between your concern for taking the drug and the concern of others is, on average, about the same. I don't want to get a relatively untested vaccine either. The difference though, between you and those who have been vaccinated, is they aren't just caring about themselves. Sorry, not sorry. You will receive no sympathy from others and your "why would people care" attitude only confirms how little you think of others, or placing yourself in their shoes.

 

You live in a Country with a very significant threat of infection. You're being selfish. Period. Get vaccinated.

 

As for the poll:

I will get vaccinated when Australia allows me too. 

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My wife and I have both completed the Pfizer shots. My 14yr old son gets his second shot next Wednesday. Not just waiting for under 12 to be tested and open for my daughter.

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I am 65+ and had my two Pfizer shots (two weeks apart) in mid-March and early-April. No reactions, no problems. Feeling fine, also wearing a mask at all times out in public, in stores, etc.                             

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I've only had the dance to get one dose so far (in canada its delayed a bit).  Eagerly awaiting the second.

 

As for the 'refusing' crowd, you have no right to complain about covid, the economic impacts, lockdowns, etc...you are part of the problem. 

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10 hours ago, Steven P. said:

Forgive me if I am wrong, but if you caught COVID-19 you will now have the same sort of immunity that the vaccine is offering? That is also the reason they say you aren't eligiable for the vacine for 6 months, because you will already have the antibodies 😛 

 

It is a bit confusing to me, but I believe that until COVID-19 is no longer a pandemic, those that have been vaccinated will likely have to have another round of shots in a year.

oh, yes, I wasn't suggesting I didn't know why I'm ineligible. My understanding is that the only reason for not vaccinating those infected sooner is because it allows more vaccine doses for those with no immunity. Which I totally agree with. Here in Switzerland, vaccination is open to everyone older than 16, so we're way past vaccinating 'at risk' individuals. Within the 2-3 months that I will wait before applying for vaccination, that will be the case even more.

 

The latest research that I have heard says that immunity due to infection is around 80%, compared to the 94% for mRNA and 70% for the J&J/AstraZeneca, so somewhere in the middle. However the level of antibodies is also a lot more variable with infection than it is after vaccination, with various reasons for why they think that. Which is why researchers are recommending getting vaccinated 1 month after getting over an infection. They also say that vaccination after infection provides protection well above levels seen with vaccination alone.

9 hours ago, neufuse said:

not eligible for 6 months? huh? here they say if you had COVID still get the shot, where are you located? I'm in Pennsylvania in the USA and they are giving it to people that had it as recently as 2 weeks before (just to make sure they are over it first). The CDC only says wait 90 days if you where treated with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma for COVID.

yes, that is the current guidance in Switzerland.

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14 hours ago, Biscuits Brown said:

Hey, if that works for you, cool. The multipage paperwork you should have received when you got the shot would disagree with you but no one bothers to read it. It clearly states you received and experimental treatment that was granted emergency use authorization, is not approved and by accepting the shot you understand the manufacturer is immune from civil or criminal action in the event you suffer any adverse effects. 

In regards to the paperwork, here it is:

Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine EUA Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers (fda.gov)

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine EUA Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers (fda.gov)

Yes, the forms state that these are unapproved, and allowed under the EUA.  This isn't a surprise - see my explanation above in my previous reply (nutshell:  EUA is just as safe, effective, and tested as fully approved).  However no where is it stated these vaccines are "experimental" from either the FDA or the companies themselves.  

 

And what you're citing in regards to immunity is the PREP Act, reference here:

https://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/legal/prepact/Pages/prepqa.aspx

And here is the HHS declaration of use for the PREP Act here:

2020-05484.pdf (govinfo.gov)

I'm not really going to get into the nitty gritty here, there's a lot to absorb.  The takeaway here is there is practically no difference between the litigation of adverse effects of a vaccine that is distributed by a fully approved FDA drug vs one that is approved under EUA (the essential elements are VICP vs CICP).   Besides this being a ridiculous argument at the outset (for example: you're more likely to just have an allergic reaction), the manufacturer is not immune from litigation over long term effects. 

 

The liability of a fully approved FDA vaccine vs a EUA approved vaccine has practically no difference to us mere mortals.   It's not experimental, there is recourse.  

 

15 hours ago, Biscuits Brown said:

Once again, if you're vaccinated, why do you even care? I'm not a threat to you (or pretty much anyone). 

Anyone is a threat to the continued pandemic when they promote vaccine hesitancy without accurate data to support their statements.  Unfortunately in the USA there are a large amount of people who are not interested in fact and would rather exercise their beliefs.  That, ironically, does not help the pandemic - or any diseases hitherto thought of as entirely eradicated - go away, and ultimately does not help others.  Herd immunity is only achieved through a majority percentage of people to protect the minority which cannot be vaccinated for whatever reason.  So yes, there is definitely a threat to others for spreading disinformation.

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On 30/05/2021 at 23:09, Biscuits Brown said:

 

Hey, if that works for you, cool. The multipage paperwork you should have received when you got the shot would disagree with you but no one bothers to read it. It clearly states you received and experimental treatment that was granted emergency use authorization, is not approved and by accepting the shot you understand the manufacturer is immune from civil or criminal action in the event you suffer any adverse effects. 

 

Once again, if you're vaccinated, why do you even care? I'm not a threat to you (or pretty much anyone). If what you took actually worked, you'd have nothing to worry about. I mean I've had my measles vaccine and don't fear those that choose not to get one because that vaccine works and has decades of data proving it. Why do so many people care if I get sick for a few days?

Vaccinated people can still get covid. So can people that can't get vaccinated. You are putting them at risk because you don't understand how they work.

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On 29/05/2021 at 21:45, dipsylalapo said:

No idea. 

 

It was the earliest that I was able to book it. They're ramping up the rollout of the second dose because of the spread of the Indian variant so could be sooner. 

I just found out the other day that I was wrong. While it's 21 days between shots, that's the recommended minimum time. The reality is that for most people the second shot is a couple of months later.

 

With that said, I'm hopefully about to accept a new job which will have me travelling back to Switzerland. So I'm going to have to contact the COVID advice phone number and see if it's possible to get moved up.

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Had my 2nd AZ shot this weekend and beyond a very slightly sore arm, no further effects.

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Changed my result to have been vaccinated. I was expecting the UK government to announce under 30's could get the vaccine at the start of last week or the end of the week before but the announcement never came, that, coupled with growing case numbers and me learning that other countries allowed people to claim leftovers, I decided to get in touch with my local GP surgery and asked if there was a leftovers list. They never explicitly said yes but they did take my details, two days later the local vaccination centre called me saying they had some leftover Pfizers and I was free to come for my jab but I'd have to hurry because they were closed now. So darted down there on my bike, made a mess of the consent form thanks to that energetic bike ride and then got the vaccine (I didn't even go dizzy!). The next day I had a sore arm but that has gone now. Next one was scheduled for eight weeks later.

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Had my second dose of AZ on Thursday.  Felt rough after both doses, although more fatigue than anything else for the 2nd.  Was fine after a good night's sleep,

Does it make me more confident about going out where there are lots of people? To be honest, not really.

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