Official Windows 11 Insider builds


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Now that we're getting Windows 11 and things are starting to change up more than the past few years with Windows 10, I un-pinned the old Windows 10 thread and started this one.

 

With the leaked build and the event coming on the 24th things are getting interesting once more.  

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Some more info on Windows 11 from early benchmarks of the leaked build.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Looks like screenshots from a newer build have hit twitter.

 

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Dark mode looking good.

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It's looking really slick, I kinda liked it before but I really like this.

 

I just hope they manage to release with consistency for once otherwise legacy UI elements will be there for the duration of Windows 11.

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Just now, cacoe said:

It's looking really slick, I kinda liked it before but I really like this.

 

I just hope they manage to release with consistency for once otherwise legacy UI elements will be there for the duration of Windows 11.

I don't expect them to get to everything by the rumored October release date, but if the goal is to do the whole UI, maybe more of those hidden 9x era bits can get removed next year.   Windows 11 is going back to a single release per year so they've got the time to do quite a bit, if they want that is.

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Indeed, does look good. I am pretty impressed so far running the leaked build. I just hope and pray that they bring taskbar on multi monitors back! It is a nightmare snapping my head back and forth from screen 2 to 1, just to click on the app icon i am after 😁 also, makes me dizzy after a while!! 😆

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I would say, keep an eye out for today 

 

These two people are not clickbait fake journalists, of which there are too many of these days...

  • Like 2
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It'll be interesting to see the first official version they send out.  I've heard a few times that not everything is going to be in there to start.   

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First official dev build is out.   Things are going to get interesting now.

 

 

 

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Got it running last night on this HP Envy Ultrabook .. it just so happen to have an 8th gen Intel. It's Sad,  I probably have 15+ computers computers and this one (which a customer recently gave me) and an Ultrabook in my theater are the only 2 that will support Windows 11.

 

The one in my theater is a water damaged Ultrabook another customer gave me. After scrubbing the motherboard with isotropic alcohol I got it working accept for the audio, which is great because the HDMI audio output still works which makes it the perfect theater PC to hook to a receiver / projector. 

 

image.thumb.png.7a0ae6fd6074128b263b05b4741e2bf6.png

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Well, TPM stuff aside, they might add some 7th gen intel chips into the supported list.  But that still leaves me and anyone else with a 6th gen or older out.  At this point I don't care enough to be mad.  It's a shame I won't be able to upgrade to 11 on this gaming pc, or my other 3 systems actually.   I'll just ride out windows 10 till I've got a new system ready, probably sometime next year when we're all talking about Windows 11.1 or whatever new version naming they're going with.

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My computer don't meet the requirements, but it put me on W11Pro anyway? Is this actually the real deal or will i have to get rid of it when it's a official build. This is not the leaked ISO, my computer restarted to this last night.

 

 

w11.PNG

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46 minutes ago, drjekel_mrhyde said:

My computer don't meet the requirements, but it put me on W11Pro anyway? Is this actually the real deal or will i have to get rid of it when it's a official build. This is not the leaked ISO, my computer restarted to this last night.

 

 

w11.PNG

Insider builds are more relaxed on requirements.

 

I got put on Enterprise, LOL. I wasn't on Enterprise before.

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I think they relaxed the rules yesterday, windows update kicked me off at 8% last week once the popup check happened. yesterday it installed on its own. its a weird situation because as the windows core RTM'd last month everything that changes now is just UI level stuff, it really shows that nothing on the os level actually required any of the harsher restrictions.

 

So if we get kicked off once the UI goes RTM then its 100% just some guys decision and not based on os limitations.

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24 minutes ago, Louisifer said:

I think they relaxed the rules yesterday, windows update kicked me off at 8% last week once the popup check happened. yesterday it installed on its own. its a weird situation because as the windows core RTM'd last month everything that changes now is just UI level stuff, it really shows that nothing on the os level actually required any of the harsher restrictions.

 

So if we get kicked off once the UI goes RTM then its 100% just some guys decision and not based on os limitations.

What did the popup check say last week?

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It just opened a mini health checker program that listed No TPM and Secure Boot for me and then it reports back to windows update to cancel the download

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6 minutes ago, Louisifer said:

It just opened a mini health checker program that listed No TPM and Secure Boot for me and then it reports back to windows update to cancel the download

I wonder, was that the same checker app that they said they took down and will release a new version of down the road?

 

image.thumb.png.0b9f928be3ec85fa65c6dfaab1140ff2.png

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It was this. this is all it does, pops up blank with a loading icon and then populates with what you failed with and when you click close it runs a clean up script or a successful script if you pass so windows update knows the outcome.d2yddompdpqxzurm_1624000513.jpeg.241ec923041ab11691d4b670997c2515.jpeg

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Think the official stance is that  you can try it via insider preview even if you don't meet the requirements but the final is not going to install for you.

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Posted (edited)

Well I took the plunge and switched my Surface Pro X to the insiders testing on the dev channel and upgraded the OS. I've been tempted to switch it since the x64 emulation came out last November, but with the supposed improvements to the UI for touch, as well as the potential ability to run android apps coming I figured why not. So far it seems to run just fine, which I would hope for a Microsoft device (you never know). I will say it sure is a nice change for WoA compared to the unfortunate fate of the Surface RT/2 that never officially got a Windows 10 upgrade (there is a leaked ARM32 insider build of Windows 10 that will install on them).

 

I actually don't have any 64-bit productivity apps I need to use on it, so I tried a few 64-bit games instead. I found one issue that the x64 emulation at the moment can't get around, and that is if the app itself checks the architecture when it loads. For example, games that use Epic Games Unreal engine start to run and then throw an "unsupported architecture" message like this one:


1386412903_2021-07-01(2).thumb.png.70bc880d532dadf75504a307c320a766.png

 

I don't don't know if there is anything Microsoft can do about that, so it might be up to the developer. Honestly I'm not sure why Epic decided to put this check in, as doing some searching it seems it's come out since the x64 emulation arrived. I've seen posts about this from people using Windows on ARM devices like the Pro X, as well as Mac users with a device using Apple's new M1 processor running Windows in a virtual machine via Parallels. Apparently Apex Legends used to run, and then broke. I may file a support ticket with Epic asking for a way to ignore or bypass this check. Hopefully there won't be many apps like this.

Edited by domboy
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anyone else have square window borders after the upgrade? every system I did they are square.... the leaked build they where round

 

and now I also lost the new explorer toolbar, it strangely went back to the old ribbon

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FYI you can access Task Manager by right clicking the start button or crtl+shift+esc as it is no longer in the corner right click menu.

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hopefully thats something they either add back to the taskbar or we can add it via registry edit along with adding refresh back to the new desktop right click

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3 hours ago, neufuse said:

anyone else have square window borders after the upgrade? every system I did they are square.... the leaked build they where round

 

and now I also lost the new explorer toolbar, it strangely went back to the old ribbon

The loss of round borders sounds like bad video drivers.

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