Official Windows 11 Insider builds


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1 hour ago, George P said:

 

 

I hope it's not RTM yet... I'm hoping they'll add app/icon folders/groups back to the start menu (for pinned apps) before it's finalized (I made sure I found and up-voted feedback requesting that). That's the main thing I miss from Windows 10. And we don't have the Andriod apps yet either, though I suppose that could already be in the build just not enabled.

 

Though, if one installed a leaked build from the insiders ring and it gets updates not sure how that's proof it's RTM...

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Just received an email from the Insiders.. stating that the Beta ring will be getting builds later this month.

 

In response to 22000 being the RTM.. not sure. Kinda leaves it up in the air.. I mean, are they releasing it soon.. or in the fall as previously known?

 

22000 may be the build prime number, but if the Dev ring is on .51... it may be well into those numbers as the final RTM. Ex: 22000.750. (give or take - just guessing)

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Build 22000.71 is out.

 

 

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Guys if you are using 22000.71 or lower build, create a folder and rename it to

System.{BB06C0E4-D293-4f75-8A90-CB05B6477EEE}

Then open it to see the absurdity. I am sure most of you will be familiar with the Classic System Properties. Windows Branding and logo is wrong there.

 

FnXjRz9.png

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On 18/07/2021 at 19:35, d5aqoëp said:

Guys if you are using 22000.71 or lower build, create a folder and rename it to

 

System.{BB06C0E4-D293-4f75-8A90-CB05B6477EEE}

 

Then open it to see the absurdity. I am sure most of you will be familiar with the Classic System Properties. Windows Branding and logo is wrong there.

 

FnXjRz9.png

welcome to beta stuff where ###### isnt finnished... Nothing new moving along

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Considering the control panel is on the way out, slow death for sure, and probably going to be even more hidden away in 11, I'd say they're not going to bother making any sort of changes to it you might find if you dig.

 

If there was some way to rip it out without breaking apps I'm sure they would've done it long ago.  It's that double edge sword called compatibility.  On one hand it makes Windows what it is, on the other it's also the bane of it's existence.

 

That's why the ideas about everything in containers that 10X was going for was super interesting IMO.  Maybe that'll find it's way into full Windows in time.

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I haven't noticed any issues with Build 22000.71 myself. 

Quote

We’ve addressed an issue that was making your mouse move slowly when hovering over the Taskbar previews.

I was experiencing that issue on my Surface Pro X with the last build, and it caused some serious mouse pointer lag when the preview popped up. Whew, so glad that's fixed.

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Looks like I have Teams chat, but it doesn't display anything, super handy...

 

SNAG-0000.png

 

Already tried killing the instance, didn't help.

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On 23/07/2021 at 02:55, Steven P. said:

Looks like I have Teams chat, but it doesn't display anything, super handy...

 

Already tried killing the instance, didn't help.

Tried updating graphics drivers?  You wouldn't think you'd even need to with a new OS but it was really slow with some of my non DirectX games until I did.

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On 23/07/2021 at 17:10, Randomevent said:

Tried updating graphics drivers?  You wouldn't think you'd even need to with a new OS but it was really slow with some of my non DirectX games until I did.

Well it is in a VM so IDK.

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On 27/07/2021 at 08:47, Steven P. said:

Well it is in a VM so IDK.

...and later I think it cleared up on its own.  I don't know, don't ask me.  :p

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On 28/07/2021 at 12:49, domboy said:

Has anyone gotten this new build?

Unlikely anyone will before tomorrow at the earliest.

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On 28/07/2021 at 21:49, domboy said:

Has anyone gotten this new build?

 

On 28/07/2021 at 21:51, adrynalyne said:

Unlikely anyone will before tomorrow at the earliest.

Yep, apparently there will also be a beta build (promised before the end of the month) so I expect we will see that tomorrow, Thursday 1PM ET

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On 28/07/2021 at 15:55, Steven P. said:

 

Yep, apparently there will also be a beta build (promised before the end of the month) so I expect we will see that tomorrow, Thursday 1PM ET

 

On 28/07/2021 at 15:51, adrynalyne said:

Unlikely anyone will before tomorrow at the earliest.

Ah ok, I do see Thursday/Friday is when mine has install the previous two builds. I wasn't sure since that tweet had the date as the 27th. Thanks.

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On 28/07/2021 at 22:09, domboy said:

 

Ah ok, I do see Thursday/Friday is when mine has install the previous two builds. I wasn't sure since that tweet had the date as the 27th. Thanks.

Microsoft tests the builds internally for a few days usually, if no computer is on fire, they release it, apparently :D 

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On 28/07/2021 at 16:13, Tantawi said:

Microsoft tests the builds internally for a few days usually, if no computer is on fire, they release it, apparently :D 

Makes sense. Thanks for the explanation! This is my first time trying an Insiders build.

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What about memory management (and gaming on it)?

It is better, the same, improved or worsened in comparison to Windows 10 latest builds?

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On 29/07/2021 at 09:19, kiddingguy said:

What about memory management (and gaming on it)?

It is better, the same, improved or worsened in comparison to Windows 10 latest builds?

Too early to make that determination. Its very rough still, and gaming really shouldn't be evaluated and considered accurate due to a lot of debugging processes running.

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On 29/07/2021 at 11:25, adrynalyne said:

Too early to make that determination. Its very rough still, and gaming really shouldn't be evaluated and considered accurate due to a lot of debugging processes running.

I don't really benchmark stuff usually so take this as you will (I do most of my gaming on Xbox atm) but it feels better for it in general.  Not significantly, but it's nice to have Auto HDR as well.

 

That said, the AMD driver installer insists their current win10 drivers are outdated but sticking with the OS' default gives me some wonky perf at times.  I'll stick with the win10 driver releases for now.

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Just to show you how ahead MS is internally compared to the build they push out to testers.

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