PC Health Check says "Your organisation manages updates on this PC"


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kiddingguy

I have a business notebook, on which I am the admin.

No network, just a clean install of WIndows 10 Pro at the time.

I have an Office 365 account, which doesn't machine 'this machine'.

 

When checking if this notebook can run Windows 11 via the PC Health Check tool, it states "Your organisation manages updates on this PC"

I have not/know not of any setting I have altered on this 'base installtion'. So what can this be?

 

When running WIndows Update, also no message is displayed that this computer is managed by my organization.

 

What can be the case here? Can I change some (registry) setting or something else?

(on another computer - same kind of installation and settings - this PC Health Check tool can run (and I can upgrade to Windows 11 :D)

PC_Health_Win11.png.bb124033d2faa016f3b05413225debdc.thumb.png.cb894bb00b9a1febef876d00307ac718.png

Edited by dipsylalapo
image updated
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adrynalyne

I am going to take a shot and say that you used some sort of Telemetry disabling tool?

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kiddingguy
4 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

I am going to take a shot and say that you used some sort of Telemetry disabling tool?

Not that I know of (also compared to my other notebook with basically the same software installed). How can I check this?

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kiddingguy

I do have 2 work accounts [Office 365] configured. I am the admin/main user of these as well.

On my other computer this 'Access work or school' is empty.

 

Might this have something to do with it?

PC_Health_Win11-accounts.png

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adrynalyne
2 minutes ago, kiddingguy said:

I do have 2 work accounts [Office 365] configured. I am the admin/main user of these as well.

On my other computer this 'Access work or school' is empty.

 

Might this have something to do with it?

PC_Health_Win11-accounts.png

Yeah it might.

 

it definitely does if you are logged in via AAD.

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slawek

Exactly the same:

 

private Windows 10 Professional (BOX) + PC Health Check from MS = "Your organisation bah bah bah..."

 

1. About 5 hours with gpedit.msc and the registry editor etc. - no positive result.

2. Turning on/off "telemetry" etc. - no effect. (I have above 30 years experience with MS Windows - from 2.0 to 10.)

3. Somebody in MS should be fired.  Why they don't log detail diagnostics like "rule x forbid y, turn it on/off or contact the administrator" ?!

 

screen-win11.png

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adrynalyne
2 hours ago, slawek said:

Exactly the same:

 

private Windows 10 Professional (BOX) + PC Health Check from MS = "Your organisation bah bah bah..."

 

1. About 5 hours with gpedit.msc and the registry editor etc. - no positive result.

2. Turning on/off "telemetry" etc. - no effect. (I have above 30 years experience with MS Windows - from 2.0 to 10.)

3. Somebody in MS should be fired.  Why they don't log detail diagnostics like "rule x forbid y, turn it on/off or contact the administrator" ?!

 

screen-win11.png

I’m not sure what your decades of experience have to do with anything. It works here, so clearly it’s something on your machine that is causing it, either because it contains a management profile or it’s something you’ve used or run in the past. 
 

As for detailed messages, I agree. I say that every time every OS and program does this to me. Did you check event viewer to see if it was triggered?

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Zorkon

Perhaps the tool will run if you create and log into a new local admin account? Or just enable the hidden Administrator account, login and try?

 

Also, has anyone checked with Process Monitor or similar whether the tool does create a log somewhere with useful info. regarding failed health checks?

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slawek
26 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

I’m not sure what your decades of experience have to do with anything. It works here, so clearly it’s something on your machine that is causing it, either because it contains a management profile or it’s something you’ve used or run in the past. 
 

As for detailed messages, I agree. I say that every time every OS and program does this to me. Did you check event viewer to see if it was triggered?

I have some experience and (believe or not) I started with CDC6000 mainframe and punch cards. I am a little tired to fix things broken by junior programmers. In theory there is always a cause (except maybe Big Bang). But your abstract small talk about "something what does something which casuses something" is conterproductive. It is only a strong belief that a rationale exist.

 

TRUE.

 

Actually I have fix the problem with HealthCheck, see below picture. (Well, you are probably does not read in pl_PL l10n, but you can see green circle with mark.)

 

What happen? Somebody in MS was a `clever`. She or he assume that remote logging to shares at school/university/workplace is equivalent to give some administrative rights to private computers of pupils/students/teachers/employees. Thus HealthCheck decides (well, some if or swich or while instruction inside code, actually jump-if-zero) that it was be dangerous to ask (if it is possible to change Windows 10 into Windows 11) without decision of school/university/workplace sysadmin.

 

Therefore when I remove any additional linked accounts except my private-personal one - the HealthCheck run without futher problems.

 

A bug in HealthCheck, but MS will name it a "feature".

 

screen-win11good.png

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slawek

Another funny thing - the message text is badly translated. Translated from Polish... that is: "You don't have to pay for your purchase of your computer." Should be: "The license to use Windows 11 on this computer will be granted at no additional charge."

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1MissBridget

I believe it's because you are using 365 through your work. The same thing happened to me when I checked to see if I can get the update on my personal computer. I have a 365 account through my work and university, but not a personal one. I am able to update Windows 10 at home, but not able to download Windows 11 and get the same error message saying I need to talk to my organization's IT. 

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adrynalyne
3 hours ago, slawek said:

I have some experience and (believe or not) I started with CDC6000 mainframe and punch cards. I am a little tired to fix things broken by junior programmers. In theory there is always a cause (except maybe Big Bang). But your abstract small talk about "something what does something which casuses something" is conterproductive. It is only a strong belief that a rationale exist.

 

TRUE.

 

Actually I have fix the problem with HealthCheck, see below picture. (Well, you are probably does not read in pl_PL l10n, but you can see green circle with mark.)

 

What happen? Somebody in MS was a `clever`. She or he assume that remote logging to shares at school/university/workplace is equivalent to give some administrative rights to private computers of pupils/students/teachers/employees. Thus HealthCheck decides (well, some if or swich or while instruction inside code, actually jump-if-zero) that it was be dangerous to ask (if it is possible to change Windows 10 into Windows 11) without decision of school/university/workplace sysadmin.

 

Therefore when I remove any additional linked accounts except my private-personal one - the HealthCheck run without futher problems.

 

A bug in HealthCheck, but MS will name it a "feature".

 

screen-win11good.png

Long story short for everyone else:

He needed to remove remote managed accounts.

;)

 

 

You keep going on about your experience which is great and all, but that is not a bug.

 

Edit:

 

Its the same reasoning that this shows up under Windows Update because I have an business account connected to my machine.

 

image.png.9a787e55df2b5c0eecc05caccd9ea082.png

 

 

 

Edited by adrynalyne
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kiddingguy

I guess it has something to do with these (business) Office/Microsoft 365 accounts.

I created a new user - nothing else installed, and than the tool ran just fine...

PC-health-newuser.png

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slawek

The fact that creating a new user (with administrator rights) has this effect is not surprising. The new user simply does not have an account that is recognized as a flag that the user is not authorized to make changes to the computer. 

 

According to the logic of MS, if I left an umbrella in your apartment, I would say that your apartment is no longer yours ... because it is now my property.

 

Since the de facto and de iure computer is mine and I decide whether and what account will be enabled / disabled, Microsoft's approach is simply wrong. The fact that - for various reasons - I can use various services does not mean that the computer is no longer mine and I will ultimately decide whether any windows will be on it ... or whether I will blast this crap and install Linux.

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adrynalyne
3 hours ago, slawek said:

The fact that creating a new user (with administrator rights) has this effect is not surprising. The new user simply does not have an account that is recognized as a flag that the user is not authorized to make changes to the computer. 

 

According to the logic of MS, if I left an umbrella in your apartment, I would say that your apartment is no longer yours ... because it is now my property.

 

Since the de facto and de iure computer is mine and I decide whether and what account will be enabled / disabled, Microsoft's approach is simply wrong. The fact that - for various reasons - I can use various services does not mean that the computer is no longer mine and I will ultimately decide whether any windows will be on it ... or whether I will blast this crap and install Linux.

I think Linux is a good choice. MS definitely implied that it was no longer your machine here. 

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slawek

Yes and no.

 

Yes, Linux is a good choice.

 

No, there are some software which are not avaliable on Linux. Games. CAD/CAM. Compilers/IDE (Atmel Studio for an example). 

 

Therefore MS can take hostages.

 

 

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1MissBridget
9 hours ago, kiddingguy said:

I guess it has something to do with these (business) Office/Microsoft 365 accounts.

I created a new user - nothing else installed, and than the tool ran just fine...

PC-health-newuser.png

I just did this too and it worked!

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ryandriftingfat

I just tried the new admin user account trick and it did not work for me.

 

I'm using W10 Education because the license was like $15 from my school and I have Office 365 installed that I'm licensed for through my school.

 

I created the temp admin account and tried both installing/running as another user from my main account, and logging in as the temp admin account and installing/running (uninstalling in between). Neither worked. I also verified that my organization isn't listed under Access Work or School, I unchecked the Allow this organization to manage my device on Office install and verified that my computer is not listed in Endpoint Manager through the Azure portal.

 

Dunno.

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adrynalyne
5 hours ago, slawek said:

Yes and no.

 

Yes, Linux is a good choice.

 

No, there are some software which are not avaliable on Linux. Games. CAD/CAM. Compilers/IDE (Atmel Studio for an example). 

 

Therefore MS can take hostages.

 

 

There is almost always an alternative application. So a lot of that is an excuse. Especially since WINE is a thing. 

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slawek

The fundamental mistakes made when creating PC Health Check are neither whether it can run or not on some configuration, nor that it requires some amazing tricks like setting up a separate user account.

 

The main mistake number one is that if it works so badly, it is not known if the results it shows are reliable. In particular, might it not be that MS will be guided by errors resulting from how their program evaluates the situation at the moment when one works normally (without disconnecting, relogging, etc. miracles and gymnastics)?

 

The fundamental mistake number two is that the PC Health Check should list all the tests it carries out and the results it receives. And if he encounters problems such as the set policy rules, write specifically what rule he does not like. The same settings (like telemetry) - if he doesn't like it so and so - then write it outright - in plain text. And not forcing us to guess puzzles and solve problems by trial and error.

 

 

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adrynalyne
15 minutes ago, slawek said:

The fundamental mistakes made when creating PC Health Check are neither whether it can run or not on some configuration, nor that it requires some amazing tricks like setting up a separate user account.

 

The main mistake number one is that if it works so badly, it is not known if the results it shows are reliable. In particular, might it not be that MS will be guided by errors resulting from how their program evaluates the situation at the moment when one works normally (without disconnecting, relogging, etc. miracles and gymnastics)?

 

The fundamental mistake number two is that the PC Health Check should list all the tests it carries out and the results it receives. And if he encounters problems such as the set policy rules, write specifically what rule he does not like. The same settings (like telemetry) - if he doesn't like it so and so - then write it outright - in plain text. And not forcing us to guess puzzles and solve problems by trial and error.

 

 

You should let MS know that. 

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slawek
9 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

There is almost always an alternative application. So a lot of that is an excuse. Especially since WINE is a thing. 

Almost. (I have been using Linux for many years. I used the Xenix a long time ago.)

 

For example: Atmel Studio (for embeded MCU, currently it is Microchip Studio) are not avaliable for Linux. Even more: Atmel-ICE  (about $100 hardware programmer/debugger for MCU) need a special drivers... I doubt if these drivers can be installed in Windows 11. Actually I have old laptop with Windows Vista to workaround "signed drivers" problems.

 

Another example - the Cyberpunk 2077 - as far as I know there is not avaliable on Linux.

 

Yes, I can switch to Linux... and waste my 30-year experience with Windows programming.

 

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adrynalyne
18 minutes ago, slawek said:

Almost. (I have been using Linux for many years. I used the Xenix a long time ago.)

 

For example: Atmel Studio (for embeded MCU, currently it is Microchip Studio) are not avaliable for Linux. Even more: Atmel-ICE  (about $100 hardware programmer/debugger for MCU) need a special drivers... I doubt if these drivers can be installed in Windows 11. Actually I have old laptop with Windows Vista to workaround "signed drivers" problems.

 

Another example - the Cyberpunk 2077 - as far as I know there is not avaliable on Linux.

 

Yes, I can switch to Linux... and waste my 30-year experience with Windows programming.

 

Heh. Read what I said again. 
Exit: nope, I needed to re-read again. 
 

Ywah I’m aware it doesn’t apply to everyone but it def.applies to quite a few who swear it doesn’t. With VMs, there is no reason why any programming experience needs to disappear either. 

Edited by adrynalyne
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kiddingguy

The newly released version didn't fix the message of my organization running this thing :(

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slawek

This was to be expected. MS takes much longer to respond meaningfully. First, the regular employee has to report the problem upwards. This then has to be considered at all appropriate levels. Then distributed down to specific employees. Then a bit of rocking around with code auditing, quality control and transferring between different departments. Finally, management again - checking that everything was done right. It's probably not Waterfall, but some PRINCE2 / SCRUM etc. At least not Agile as it would be appropriate for a small company. Microsoft is micro in name only. My guess is that programmers in MS account for less than 30% of the staff.

 

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