Difference in performance on USB-C from an USB-hub; connection via adapter USB3.1-to-USB-C or direct connection


 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm having an Anker 4-port USB 3.0 Ultra Slim Data Hub (USB 3.1) (causing interference with my mouse).

 

I can connect the USB-hub to an adapter USB3.1 to USB-C (see pic with the 'B') and plug it in my computer, and have the USB-dongle for my mouse be in the generic USB 3.1 port.

 

My question performance wise (and maybe even also 'power wise'): is it better to have a "native" USB-C type usb-hub? Or can I also use an adapter from USB-C to USB 3.1 and have the same performance?

I would like to have this USB-hub powerless/no power supply.

 

In case of a direct connection a new USB-hub has to be bought by me (like e.g. this Satechi as attached)

USBC.jpg

USBC1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The difference is negligible as long as the adapter is the same speed/usb version as what is plugging into it. 
 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 30/07/2021 at 16:52, adrynalyne said:

The difference is negligible as long as the adapter is the same speed/usb version as what is plugging into it. 
 

 

OK. So USB3.1 device/hub into this adapter still brings it (down) to USB3.1. I get that ;)

So, technically it's better to have a 100% USB-C usb-hub, like e.g. the Satechi I posted here).

The devices connected to, determine the actual speed/throughput. But USB-C has a higher bandwidth, so technically my connected HDD and running device (when connected) can operate on full speed.... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

USB-C doesn’t have a higher bandwidth if it’s backed by the same tech as the USB-A ports. It’s just a different connector at that point. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
On 30/07/2021 at 16:58, adrynalyne said:

USB-C doesn’t have a higher bandwidth if it’s backed by the same tech as the USB-A ports. It’s just a different connector at that point. 

I see that "A USB-C port equipped with Thunderbolt 3 can push data speeds to a theoretical limit of 40Gbps. To show how far we've come, that's four times faster than USB 3.1"

 

So, maybe even when connecting USB3.1 (10Gbps) the 'internals' of the USB-hub are I guess "more equipped" to handle these speeds.

("simplified": 4 USB 3.1 devices of 10Gbps = 40 Gbps; instead of a USB3.1 USB-hub which gives more or less 2.5 Gbps (maybe maxed out to 5Gbps) if not all are on full load per port (10Gbps/4 ports is this 2.5Gbps)

 

Or does this kinda tech in usb-hubs work differently?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 30/07/2021 at 08:17, kiddingguy said:

I see that "A USB-C port equipped with Thunderbolt 3 can push data speeds to a theoretical limit of 40Gbps. To show how far we've come, that's four times faster than USB 3.1"

 

So, maybe even when connecting USB3.1 (10Gbps) the 'internals' of the USB-hub are I guess "more equipped" to handle these speeds.

("simplified": 4 USB 3.1 devices of 10Gbps = 40 Gbps; instead of a USB3.1 USB-hub which gives more or less 2.5 Gbps (maybe maxed out to 5Gbps) if not all are on full load per port (10Gbps/4 ports is this 2.5Gbps)

 

Or does this kinda tech in usb-hubs work differently?

Nah.

 

The controller is what matters here. If all of your controllers are USB 3.1, you get the same bandwidth regardless of connector type. If your USB-C is Thunderbolt, then thats different.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 30/07/2021 at 17:34, adrynalyne said:

Nah.

 

The controller is what matters here. If all of your controllers are USB 3.1, you get the same bandwidth regardless of connector type. If your USB-C is Thunderbolt, then thats different.

The specs on Satechi's site lists: "CONNECTOR TYPE Type-C, Thunderbolt 3 Compatible"
Than the question... is my notebook Thunderbolt 3 Compatible?! Have to look that one up ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 30/07/2021 at 08:40, kiddingguy said:

The specs on Satechi's site lists: "CONNECTOR TYPE Type-C, Thunderbolt 3 Compatible"
Than the question... is my notebook Thunderbolt 3 Compatible?! Have to look that one up ;)

Not from what I saw.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
On 30/07/2021 at 17:42, adrynalyne said:

Not from what I saw.

You're right on that one. The manual states: USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C, transfer rate up to 10 Gbps.

So... I can just use this adapter than?! And safe myself almost a 100 bucks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 30/07/2021 at 08:46, kiddingguy said:

You're right on that one. The manual states: USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C, transfer rate up to 10 Gbps.

So... I can just use this adapter than?! And safe me almost a 100 bucks.

You can; but if you run out of power for the devices or see malfunctions due to lower power, you will know why.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 30/07/2021 at 17:47, adrynalyne said:

You can; but if you run out of power for the devices or see malfunctions due to lower power, you will know why.

Yeah I know (mouse issues). But this one is not on the same USB-ports input on my mobo.

So, (hopefully) the internal power relay to these USB ports (type A & type C) are different... and therefore causing -probably- less issues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding your mouse interference ... nothing to do with the power on the A or C ports. 5 and 10 Gbps USB speeds  generate a lot of RF energy in the 2.4GHz spectrum. Poor shielding on devices or having these 5/10Gbps devices operating very close to a 2.4GHz receiver will cause issues. Physically separate them.

 

https://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/public/us/en/documents/white-papers/usb3-frequency-interference-papers.pdf

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 30/07/2021 at 18:01, jasondefaoite said:

Thx.

So, my assumption could be correct as the 2.4Ghz dongle is place next to the USB-port of the USB-hub, and hence the interference.

And... using a completely different (USB-C) port on another side of the notebook making the distance larger and, therefore, causing less interference due to the distance between the plugged in 2.4Ghz receiver and the via USB-connected usb-hub.

 

Image taken from page 9 of this white paper. 

USBC2.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I had my Logitech unifier wireless dongle, it never worked correctly in the back port, so what I did is I got a 6ft USB extension cable, plugged it in the same port and then ran the wire and taped it to the back of my screen, mouse and keyboard worked great after that.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I looked up an overview of this Asus GL731V notebook, and came across this video.

The image a still from it.

 

Looks like the connectors are wired to a different part of/on the motherboard, so with the usb-hub plugged into the USB-C port (above in picture), and the mouse-dongle in the 'regular' USB (part of the port-of-3) (right-side op picture)  I think I'm better off...

ASUS-GL731.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.