Why Do People Care So Much About Automatic Updates?


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I may look like I'm trolling, I'm really not - I just don't understand why people are so afraid of updates.

 

I have a home PC, play a few games on it, a bit of web browsing, Spotify...  I don't code, use virtual machines, so anything "exciting" but I'd also have thought I'm in the majority of Windows Home users.

 

The last 12 months worth of updates has been fine... nothing that has been installed has broken the system.

 

While I understand many here will be using their home PCs to do more than the general gaming, web browsing, I don't understand why people got all mad about automatic (some called it forced) updates.  Surely you'd want your system to be on the latest and most secure version?  But I don't understand what people do.  Leave the update for X months, then install it?  Why delay?  Do people have setups that seem to break every time some sort of update is installed?  I also understand some updates can be buggy, and the rare one that can break nearly every system but I'm not quite sure what it is about updates that people seem to be afraid of them.

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For me it isn't necessarily the update itself, but the restart that is sometimes required after. I might have several things going on, so needing to note down where I am for each thing so that I can go back to it after the restart is a pain. Thank god browsers started using a "restore session" feature!

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On 02/09/2021 at 07:38, Sir Topham Hatt said:

I just don't understand why people are so afraid of updates.

I have had updates hose machines before.  That is why.  This within itself is sufficient reason for me to hold-fire on most updates for a week or so.

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On 02/09/2021 at 07:38, Sir Topham Hatt said:

I have a home PC, play a few games on it, a bit of web browsing, Spotify...  I don't code, use virtual machines, so anything "exciting" but I'd also have thought I'm in the majority of Windows Home users.

Where have you seen that people are afraid of updates? If it's on this forum it's probably a skewed audience where an update can break compatibility with certain programs.

 

You may be in the majority of Windows Home Users with how you use your machine, but most websites/forums where people are complaining are likely to be in minority and may have very valid reasons for not wanting an update.

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I don't personally care tbh, at most it's a minor annoyance when a restart is required or boot takes a bit longer for update.

 

Can't say that I've had any compatibility problems either, not via Windows update, driver updates on the other hand...

 

More annoying is the bandwidth being taken at random in the BG.

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Like Nick, it's not the updates themselves so much as the forced restart without my explicit permission. I've lost days of work before now because a restart has force closed a program losing data. For instance at work I do a lot inside a VM hosted by Oracle Virtual Box. When W10 force restarts the VM gets closed and anything running in the VM is gone. I've also written programs that were running simulations that needed to run for several days. They get force closed and lose everything.

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why? because a few months ago we had about 12 servers go nuts after the latest CU fixed the print spooler issue... took us down for some services for a couple days and this wasn't even auto updates! this was scheduled updates, our initial testing seemed to work, when deployed still broke stuff we didn't account for.. if that can happen with some testing, it sure can happen with no deployment testing automatically

 

yeah home users should be pushed to update as soon as possible but enterprises need to schedule stuff or at least get a period of time to schedule stuff and I mean months not days so complete testing can be done

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I don't dislike updates. I hate the interruptions. Windows updates are disruptive because:

 

- They start unexpectedly when I start my computer. A computer is usually started to actually use it, not to wait for updates.

- They show disruptive notifications, in which I have to tell it when it is OK to reboot my computer

- They start unexpectedly when I want to shut down my computer (How many times I had to leave the office in a hurry to get the kids from school before it closes, and Windows updates start when I want to shut down and put the PC in my bag. I had to let it finish its updates on multiple occasions while driving, with the computer in the seat next to me)

 

The updates implementation in Windows is just not convenient for someone that actually want to use his/her computer.

 

I prefer the updates implementation on Linux. When updates are available, an icon appears next to the clock. If you don't want to update right now, you just ignore it and continue your work/entertainment. When you choose to update, most of the times, they don't require a reboot. When they do require a reboot (e.g. kernel updates), there is only a one-time popup letting you choose to restart or not. If you don't restart immediately, you're not nagged about it ever again. the update just happens at the next reboot. That's so bliss!

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On Patch Tuesdays I jump in head first and at Noon install the update on all my PC's. Never had one that had a show stopper issues on any of them. I install them all at the same time, so I'm in control when they install the update and reboot.

 

I just don't want to accidently leave something open and unsaved over night only to have the PC decide to update. 

 

If there is a problem I'd like to have things like my file server update while I'm home and not while I'm at my gf's house.

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On 02/09/2021 at 08:43, Raphaël G. said:

I don't dislike updates. I hate the interruptions. Windows updates are disruptive because:

 

- They start unexpectedly when I start my computer. A computer is usually started to actually use it, not to wait for updates.

- They show disruptive notifications, in which I have to tell it when it is OK to reboot my computer

- They start unexpectedly when I want to shut down my computer (How many times I had to leave the office in a hurry to get the kids from school before it closes, and Windows updates start when I want to shut down and put the PC in my bag. I had to let it finish its updates on multiple occasions while driving, with the computer in the seat next to me)

 

The updates implementation in Windows is just not convenient for someone that actually want to use his/her computer.

 

I prefer the updates implementation on Linux. When updates are available, an icon appears next to the clock. If you don't want to update right now, you just ignore it and continue your work/entertainment. When you choose to update, most of the times, they don't require a reboot. When they do require a reboot (e.g. kernel updates), there is only a one-time popup letting you choose to restart or not. If you don't restart immediately, you're not nagged about it ever again. the update just happens at the next reboot. That's so bliss!

That last paragraph is EXACTLY why I've switched from Windows to Linux on all but the wife's machine and it's very close to getting wiped also as I simply can't stand how long Windows updates take! Heck, I can clean install and update Linux in the amount of time it takes to install those stupid Cumulative updates on Windows. Also, as mentioned by Raphael, no nagging about updates from Linux either.

 

Also hate those "feature" updates which install who knows what on your machine that you most likely have absolutely  no use for!

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In my own case, I'm legally obligated to consider Microsoft a threat actor -- or potential threat actor -- due to old confidentiality and security contracts. This means that I can't give them what's basically an unlimited backdoor to my systems... especially since they have historically abused it.

 

Updates are one thing. Windows 7 even allowed you to uninstall them if you knew what you were doing. Starting with Win 10, that ability went away. Coupled with the automatic, forced updates, Microsoft can now use your OS to deliver pretty much any obnoxious adware or spyware they wish... and you can't get rid of it. This isn't a hypothetical.

 

Microsoft has used their access to Windows 10 systems to delete programs, to support their spying campaigns, to push unwanted and deceptive malware onto users, to force people to use their online services, and to detect competing software while pushing obnoxious and deceptive ads on people who use it.

 

(I actually had problems finding the links for that last one, since none of the ones I did find through a quick series of Google and DuckDuckGo searches were about the specific incident I was thinking of... which kinda actually reinforces my point there.)

 

This is not the behavior of a benevolent or trustworthy actor. And even if there weren't contractual issues involved, I couldn't justify trusting someone that thoroughly after they've already shown a willingness to abuse that trust.

 

Thus I'm posting this from the one Windows 7 machine I still have and regularly use -- almost all my others have moved to Linux, but I still need something that can run old software from time to time.

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