Falcon Heavy: USSF-44 spysat (+ 2 others)


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Falcon Heavy will be flexing its muscles a bit; three direct to geostationary satellites at once. No GTO (geostationary transfer orbit), straight to 35,785 km (22,236 miles).

 

USSF-44: a US spysat

 

Aurora 4A: a commercial commsat

 

TETRA-1: a tech demo microsat built by Boeing's Millennium Space Systems [read: Boeing Phantom Works] for USSF's Space and Missile Systems Center’s Space Enterprise Consortium

 

Date: October 9, 2021
Time: TBA
Pad: LC-39A
Recovery: 2 boosters on Just Read the Instructions and A Shortfall of Gravitas
Orbit: direct insertion to geosynchronous orbit

 

Bring yer popcorn

 

Aurora 4A

https://www.anchoragepress.com/news/new-telecom-satellite-for-alaska-on-schedule-for-launch-next-summer-will-provide-broadband-high/article_3c355424-0dad-11eb-8f93-0feaade192f0.html

 

TETRA-1

https://www.satellitetoday.com/government-military/2020/04/24/u-s-space-forces-tetra-1-satellite-is-ready-for-launch/

 

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really looking forward to this one. Will it be the regular fairing or using the new extended one? Any changes to the 'second' stage to get it straight to geostationary?

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On 25/09/2021 at 01:58, bguy_1986 said:

I also want to make sure I read/understood this right because I'm an idiot...haha.  Center core isn't being recovered?

No it’s to be expended. This is going to be a really high power launch, that’s why there will be two recovery ships out at sea for the side boosters, there means there won’t be one for the main stage and it will be going too fast to slow down.

 

Anyone know how much this launch is costing compared to a fully recovered FH? I presume we won’t see any centre stages land now to be honest.

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On 25/09/2021 at 03:14, anthdci said:

>

Anyone know how much this launch is costing compared to a fully recovered FH? I presume we won’t see any centre stages land now to be honest.

 

A fully expended new Falcon Heavy is about $150m + launch services like fuelling the payload,  storage, etc.

 

An expended center core w/recovered boosters FH launch is about $90m + launch services, and can deliver about 90% of the full expended performance (57.4t to LEO vs 63.8t).

 

This launch having a Space Force primary payload, they likely asked for extra margins hence the expense of the center core.

 

"Lower energy" launches, like tossing a car into the asteroid belt 😂, with lower margins could see the boosters land at LZ-1/2 and the center core on a droneship.

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On 24/09/2021 at 15:20, anthdci said:

really looking forward to this one. Will it be the regular fairing or using the new extended one? Any changes to the 'second' stage to get it straight to geostationary?

 

Most likely a standard fairing.

 

The extended fairing will be for the really big DoD spy birds, launching 2 Lunar Gateway modules at once, etc. and those will need the LC-39A mobile vertical integration tower, which hasn't been built yet. They're preparing the pad & infrastructure, and building the segments off-site.

 

Pad-39A-mobile-service-tower-renders-SpaceX-Falcon-Heavy-stretched-fairing-1.thumb.jpg.5bf5dda0ee1fca695c8f67d6424dd0c9.jpg

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