[HardDrive] Do you think the WD HC550 16T is a inferior version of 18T?


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Both 16T and 18T has 9 disks. 

16T's Areal Density (Gbits/sq. in, max) is 918, 18T's is 1022.

So someone says 16T is a downgrade version of 18T, and the disks are inferior-quality product.

 

What is the truth?

 

Thanks.

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They are right, Generally higher areal density is considered more desirable.

 

On paper the 18TB is faster, but not enough to notice the difference IMO. It's not like an SSD vs HDD situation.

Quote

Sustained transfer rate (MB/s, max) / (MiB/s, max)  269/257 (18TB) 262/250 (16TB)

https://documents.westerndigital.com/content/dam/doc-library/en_us/assets/public/western-digital/product/data-center-drives/ultrastar-dc-hc500-series/data-sheet-ultrastar-dc-hc550.pdf

 

But I have no way to tell whether it's an "inferior-quality product" though. Perhaps others may know.

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On 29/11/2021 at 15:38, hellowalkman said:

They are right, Generally higher areal density is considered more desirable.

 

On paper the 18TB is faster, but not enough to notice the difference IMO. It's not like an SSD vs HDD situation.

https://documents.westerndigital.com/content/dam/doc-library/en_us/assets/public/western-digital/product/data-center-drives/ultrastar-dc-hc500-series/data-sheet-ultrastar-dc-hc550.pdf

 

But I have no way to tell whether it's an "inferior-quality product" though. Perhaps others may know.

I've read the data sheet, too.

Except the performance difference, I just care about if it would have quality or lifetime issues.

Because I just bought TWO 16T.😂

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Hello,


That seems unlikely.  The platters have to be manufactured with a specific storage capacity in mind, if areal density is the deciding factor for that.  It does not seem to me like a hard disk drive manufacturer would say "oh, these platters have insufficiently small magnetic particles on them for 1,022 Gbit/in2, so we'll use them in making 988 Gbit/in2 hard disk drives."  In other words, I do not think they would bin drive platters that way in the same way a CPU manufacturer bins CPUs by cores and frequency.  There would be too many different kinds of platters to hold in inventory for manufacturing, and it would make testing and quality assurance very burdensome.

 

Regards,


Aryeh Goretsky

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