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MLB Bans THG


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According to Yahoo News,

MLB has issued a statement banning the use of THG.

The health policy advisory committee of management and the players' association unanimously determined last Thursday that THG builds muscle mass and should be added to baseball's list of banned substances.

Baseball's decision was revealed to The Associated Press on Wednesday by Rob Manfred, executive vice president for labor relations in the commissioner's office, and Gene Orza, the union's chief operating officer.

The Food and Drug Administration (news - web sites) ruled Oct. 28 that THG, which stands for tetrahydrogestrinone, is an illegal drug that lacks federal permission for sale in the United States.

Because baseball and other sports did not know about THG before last October, drug testing was unable to detect it.

Barry Bonds' personal trainer, Greg Anderson, was among four men indicted last month on charges of illegally supplying performance-enhancing drugs from BALCO. All four pleaded innocent.

Bonds, Jason Giambi and Gary Sheffield were among the athletes called to testify before a grand jury. All have denied using illegal steroids.

Anabolic steroids are synthetic versions of the male hormone testosterone. Some are approved by FDA for prescription-only sale to treat certain diseases.

Baseball commissioner Bud Selig told a Congressional committee last week that he hopes to have a tougher testing plan than the one called for in baseball's labor contract.

The plan has drawn some criticism. Players with major league contracts are tested only twice in a one-week period each year, and penalties — no suspension until the second offense — are far weaker than those called for in Olympic sports.

The day before the hearing, Selig sent a letter to the union asking to discuss the drug agreement. The players' association has not yet responded.

Selig is powerless to act unilaterally because drug testing is covered by collective bargaining. While the major league baseball constitution gives Selig broad power to act in the "best interests of baseball," in the labor contract he agreed the commissioner will take no action to "negate rights of players."

Something needed in the wake of the Bonds trial. but still the last para is the worst thing to happen. ESPN reported last night that an anonmyous baseball player gives an interview in the issue on March29 that the union will oppose any moves becoz the owners do not want it. Players are not allowed to talk to the press even if they do not take steroids. So, if the union is not up for it, then god knows what will happen?

i think the owners are only interested in protecting their investment, not concerned about the general welfare of the game at all. Something should be done along the lines of NFL.

What do you guys think?

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it sucks that the players get away with **** like that. baseball needs a real commissioner - not acting - who has some balls to take over the running of the game. selig is useless in the position.

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it sucks that the players get away with **** like that. baseball needs a real commissioner - not acting - who has some balls to take over the running of the game. selig is useless in the position.

MLB Commish has less powers but needs the vote of the union for anything to act on. That's why it sucks, not becoz Selig cannot do anything. His hands are tied but seriously, I would prefer something like the NFL does for its drug testing.

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While the major league baseball constitution gives Selig broad power to act in the "best interests of baseball," in the labor contract he agreed the commissioner will take no action to "negate rights of players."

Selig needs to give this some serious consideration. If you've been watching much ESPN lately, you've seen several MLB players give interviews on the steroid issue. When asked if they would take a steroid test, almost every one of them has said something along the lines of "Yes, I'd be glad to. I want to clear my name, but the players union won't allow that and i'm not going to go against my own union."

Every day the players union goes on without allowing its players to take these tests, it makes it more and more obvious that they are trying to hide something, most likely some of the more prominent players who are known steroid users. The union heads want to protect these big time players because they think if the public knew they used steroids, it would have an adverse effect on the game. The truth is quite the opposite. The players who would test positive for steroids would surely look like fools and all their achievements would be put into question, but at least then the rest of the players would be off the hook, there would by none of this constant uncertainty, and we could go on with what is shaping up to be of the most exciting baseball seasons ever.

This is in the "best interest of baseball." This is also Bud Selig's chance to make a name for himself. He is going to be remembered as a lousy commissioner if this steroid cloud is still looming when he leaves the office after the CBA expires in 2006. I can't wait for this season to start, it would really be a shame if it was overshadowed by drug use all year.

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