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Possible to wire ethernet like phone?


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Qwakui

I just bought a laptop and would like to have it on my home network while it is in any room in the house. Wireless is not an option because of price, security, speed, and interference, so I will use ethernet. I have a 4-port switch. The first 3 ports are used for 3 desktops in the house. They are wired such that a CAT5 cable goes from the switch, to the crawlspace, and then to the room where the computer is, where it is connected to a wall jack. The 4th port on my switch is unused. If I connect a CAT5 cable from the switch to a wall jack somewhere in my house, then connect another wall jack to that wall jack and so on for as many jacks as I'd like (like telephones wires are done) will that work? If so, what will be the pro's and con's? Will I be able to use all of the jacks in this chain at once or just one at a time?

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episode

Only one at a time, they would be the same connection, just piggybacked. Wiring a house for ethernet is a b*tch.

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Roger H.

well wireless in the end would probably be cheaper but since you already had the switch ii guess you're plan should work. I think you should be able to use all of them at onetime since that's how networks are anyways... i don't see how you'd use all of them at onetime since you only have 1 laptop? You'd move to each room with the laptop and plug it in there wherever you went to the cable would only be used once is and shouldn't matter since the other jacks would just allow the signals to pass thru like the jack wasn't even there...

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Qwakui

Using all jacks at once would not happen with just one laptop, but for further down the road, I will want to add more desktops/laptops to my network and spend the least amount of money possible. Episode, if what you say is true (I'm not arguing with you), how then do home phoneline networks work if they're wired the same way?

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Xcalibur
Originally posted by Qwakui

Using all jacks at once would not happen with just one laptop, but for further down the road, I will want to add more desktops/laptops to my network and spend the least amount of money possible. Episode, if what you say is true (I'm not arguing with you), how then do home phoneline networks work if they're wired the same way?

phoneline networking = bad

i used it for a few years and it sucked. i'm using ethernet now.

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modem

Qwakui,

I have actually done quite a bit of work with the phone systems in the manner you described. I've also wired my house for ethernet and phone systems so I'm quite familiar with these setups. To answer your question about what are the pro's and cons.

The biggest pro would be that you could go from room to room unplug your laptop goto the next room and have that instant internet access. That unfortunately is about the only pro involved with that.

The con's are actually quite a few more than the pros. As a few people have mentioned only ONE computer can be on that cable and working at one time. So if you never planned to upgrade to more computers that setup would be great. But if you did, you would have to immediately re-wire those entire rooms. You asked why that can work for a phone system and not for a computer system...here's why.

Phone systems are based on an analog signal. Unlike digital signals, analog tones in their raw format (minus a modem) can not carry a digital signal. They can't carry a header with a destination IP address or any address. Phone signals just continue on down a wire until there is a device to stop it and create a ring or until the signal dies out. That is why if you have 4 phones on the same line all 4 phones ring at once and you can carry a convo with 4 people together like that.

Now with a Digital signal, that signal carries headers and information destined for one IP address only. Also the ethernet protocol was purposely designed this way for one device on one wire to a direct connection to a hub/switch. Thats what gives it the star topology classification. What you said reminds me of a Bus topology from the old thicknet days of coax connecting 10 computers together. That there could be a option, but it only maxes out at 10Mbps unlike ethernet with 100 and 1000 Mbps.

I hope this helps.

-Bradley

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