Information Technology vs. Computer Science


Recommended Posts

Lexcyn
What is the difference between COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS and INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY.

585393262[/snapback]

Computer Information Systems focuses mainly on how to build information systems (such as databses) for companies. It's more business focused I find.

Correct me if I am wrong.

Link to post
Share on other sites
kjordan2001
Hardly. Most graduating CS majors haven't a clue how an operating system works yet alone a chip. They are experts at algorithms and data structures. Basically they abstract themselves beyond implementation. That is the goal of computer science.

What you describe is computer engineerin. We are the ones designing chips and embedded systems. Look how many standards are IEEE.

585393561[/snapback]

Chips yes, operating systems no. Every university I know requires CS majors to take an operating systems course. Maybe not the type you're thinking of (embedded?), but even then there's CS courses that cover some stuff from embedded systems. CS majors don't really need to know all that much about chip design since we build on top of that chip, not the actual chip.

Link to post
Share on other sites
neowin_hipster

I must admit I haven't taken OS I and II yet, but I was in a class last semester which required knowledge of posix. I had selected a team member with fairly high grade. A 4th year cs major who'd taken both courses. I kind of expected to give him a crash course in architecture which is no biggie, but i didn't plan to have to teach him things like mutex, pipe, scheduling, threads, and other basics. At first i thought he had a vague idea but didn't have a clue when he went to go use them. Apparently you study certain algorithms commonly used but you never see it implemented. You can check the curriculum out. It has a lot to do with stuff relevent to db coders (from my point of view). So i sat down and explained the basics, who/what/when/where/why/ and how. Btw, he's not the only one i've encountered like this.

But i will restate, that cs majors aren't as well versed in lower-levels of architecture as engineering students. Likewise engineers typically don't know as much about ai and algorithms. I will agree with you there, cs majors don't need to know about chip design and that stuff because you guys don't have to deal with that. You've abstracted yourselves beyond it. It's not a bad thing you know. Not an insult. The only reason engineers care about implementation is because we need to do it. You guys have a different class of things to worry about.

Link to post
Share on other sites
PsychCom

here in norway we have IT and IKT. they mean the same.

IT = information technology

IKT= information and communication technology

I think the same thing aplies to IT and CIT ?

Im a NetworkAdministrator at a high school getting my certificate of apprenticeship in IKT-Managment operator (aka System Admin)

if you choose Computer Science you will spend more time in developing and making solutions on a grand scale. much programing and so forth...

but IT is more of a systemadmin who gives support, manage, operates and runs the systems.

I chose the IT becouse of the fact that i get more active work than a CIT, and i like to manage, set everything up and get it to run properly.

Link to post
Share on other sites
UKer
Computer Information Systems focuses mainly on how to build information systems (such as databses) for companies. It's more business focused I find.

Correct me if I am wrong.

585393590[/snapback]

You are somewhat wrong, as IS is a mix.

I teach IS at Master's level and it does involve database design and modelling for developing large scale systems, as well as other business related areas such as IS Project Management (i.e. UML modelling), information storage and retrieval (search engines etc) and ePublishing (XML etc), but some of the work is run by the Information Studies Department and half by CS, so ~50% is technical stuff like object oriented programming and network and computer architecture, you can even choose from two 'pathways', one is less techical but still includes things like Java and the other is more CS-oriented and includes much more demanding technical skills.

An example of a management-related course that involves things like databases would be Information Management, this is far less techical and more business oriented.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...
kamotekyu_ph

Computer Information Systems focuses mainly on how to build information systems (such as databses) for companies. It's more business focused I find.

Correct me if I am wrong.

IT - computers and telecommunications

IS - how to manage the IT

Link to post
Share on other sites
W1cked-J

IMO an IT degree is useless. Most computer jobs ask for a computer science degree, whether it's networking or programming.

That is a bit harsh!! Remember that when one of us with the IT degree has to fix your e-mail or network issue ;) . I have a IT Degree in Networking systems (Associates) and it is not useless and I can honestly say the knowledge I have from that and from learning on my own has helped me get ahead in my career rather quickly. 3 1/2 years ago I was a Journeyman Tool & Die Maker and decided to make a change into IT. Yes I took a cut in pay ($11k/year) to go into to IT but now, 3 1/2 years later I am $13k/year AHEAD of where I was as a Tool Maker.

The big thing is Degrees are not as important as some might think. The first job I had in IT, that company could have cared less if I had a degree, they were more worried about what I knew, not how I learned it. And I must have done something right because when I announced to them this past Nov that I was leaving for another company they fought like all hell to keep me. In the end I just needed a change in my life to make things move along. So over all, a degree helps but if you find the right place they won't have to see that expensive piece of paper. :D

Link to post
Share on other sites
illicit

Man this is gonna turn into a flame war.

I majored in IT. I have a great and lucrative job at a major insurance company. I have friends who majored in CS. They have great and lucrative jobs also. The thing that attracted me to IT is that it is much more concerned with business needs and the application of technology to the enterprise. This kind of thinking will get you really far in the corporate environment.

If you want to work on/manage projects and business process go IT. If you want to write code go CS.

Well said...

Link to post
Share on other sites
runningking7

To oversimplify:

Computer Science = programming

IT = networking/integration

Exactly what I would have said

Link to post
Share on other sites
Martyn

It depends on the country that you will be studying in, I think. In the UK a Computer Science degree seems more sought after than a IT degree. So if I was to pick one I think I would go for Computer Science.

Link to post
Share on other sites
daeus

I've found educational establishments all crossover the boundaries of what their courses cover by the name of it, CS can mean the same as an IT course at different establishments.

Also all "IT" is "ICT" these days because of how networking has become so important.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jexel

I'm hoping to do Combined Computer Science and commerce. Though the unis are not very elaborate on the course information. Probably the best way to find out information about any course is to go to the uni's open day and simply ask questions.

Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.