Is midnight the start of a day or end of a day?


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KrAzY

Ok, quick question. Does midnight signify the beginning of the day or the end of the day?

So if I were to say either of these:

Military time: Monday @ 00:00 Hours or 24:00 Hours

Regular time: Monday @ 12:00 A.M.

Would that be the when:

Sunday becomes Monday

-or-

Monday becomes Tuesday

Hmm....

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lostspyder

midnight is only the begining of the night :ninja:

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Chad.C

00:00 Hours is both the beginning and ending..

I tend to also start a new week from Sunday, but then Monday seems more logical.

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radioboy

it would signify the beginning of monday, aka there are 23 more hours of monday ahead of you

the exception is tv listings... usually tuesday at 2am means 2am on wednesday

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KrAzY

If I scheduled something for Monday at Midnight.

Would you be there Sunday @ 11:59PM or Monday 11:59PM?

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Post-It Note

I would think it would be Monday at 11:59.

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KrAzY
I would think it would be Monday at 11:59.

585507560[/snapback]

That's the way I'm leaning...

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RatherLargeBear

Midnight.

as in middle of the night

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shihchiun

I think 00:00 is the beginning of a new day and 23:59 is the last minute of a day.

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EvilPodAE

Monday 12:01AM-12:00PM

Tuesday 12:01AM-12:00PM

Thats why whenever your insurance expires on a certain date say Feb 1st, when they send you the letter they say your coverage expires 12:01AM on Feb 1st. Not that I would know this from expierence.

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kylejn

Midnight is the start of a day.

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gigapixels

End of day - 11:59:59 PM

Beginning of day - 12:00 AM

There are milliseconds ;)

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Pajter

I see it as a circle, it "starts" at 00:00 hours, but it also "ends" there. Still, for me, 00:00 is the start of a new day for me. When it's sunday, it becomes monday @ 00:00 hour... Yeah, something like that :p

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lostspyder
I would think it would be Monday at 11:59.

585507560[/snapback]

hehe i love your sig man

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ozgeek

Yep. 00:00 is the starting time of a day so if your are on a Sunday night and it's 11.59:59 PM, one more millisecond will result in the start of Monday's day. Same goes on for the other days.

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.will
End of day - 11:59:59 PM

Beginning of day - 12:00 AM

There are milliseconds ;)

585507620[/snapback]

no you can break it down to 11 hrs 59 mins 59.99 sec which could be broken down to 11 hrs 59 mins 59.999 sec which could be broken down to 11 hrs 59 mins 59.9999 sec, etc, etc, etc.

picture it as a number line

---------------------------------------|------------------------------------------

MONDAY......................................TUESDAY.......................................

the | signifies midnight. a line has no width. it is a one demensional object. right up until midnight its monday. right after midnight its tuesday. at THE EXACT MOMENT of midnight, its neither monday nor tuesday because that moment does not exist as humans can comprehend. that EXACT MOMENT has no length. its just a moment.

i guess im overanalyzing this.

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Thrawn

The fact of the matter is that saying "Monday at midnight" is an ambiguous statement, and if you wanted to specify a date and time at midnight, you?d have to be more specific, ie, Monday morning at midnight (or Monday morning at 12:00), or Monday night at midnight (or Monday night at 12:00). But with military time, I think it?s incorrect to write 24:00. Either it?s 11:59:59? or it?s 00:00 (zero hours).

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John

"Midnight" is the first instant of a day. Monday @ midnight would technically be the minute before 12:01 AM :yes: Which is still considered Monday.

Similarly, 12:00 PM is noon, or "midday". Even though 12 comes after 11, that's technically wrong. 12 comes before 1.

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Porssi

Everything that has a beginning, has an end :shifty:

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Post-It Note
Both.

585508926[/snapback]

It can't be both! What if you were going to greet someone? Would you say either "Good morning" or "Good evening"?

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deadlogics
Everything that has a beginning, has an end :shifty:

585508891[/snapback]

I see the end coming, I see the darkness spreading. I guess it's time to go to bed now :)

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CAH

Midnight is high noon for vampires :ninja:

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FiREFLi
It can't be both!  What if you were going to greet someone?  Would you say either "Good morning" or "Good evening"?

585512452[/snapback]

Actually I tihnk it can... with the help of a mathematical illustration

Take monday as day 9 and tuesday as day 10. where each new number is a new midnight. Ok, still with me?

[11:55] As we get closer [11:59] and closer [11:59.9] to tuesday [11:59.999999] the number '9' get's closer and closer to '10'.

So as in the above sentance you might have something like this: 9.7, 9.9, 9.99999 and then we get to 9.9 recurring, that is an infinite amount of 9s on the end. And then we can do the maths (just take '.999...' as the recurring decimal here)

x = 9.999...

10x = 99.999...

9x = 10x - x

9x = 99.999... - 9.999...

9x = 90

[divide both sides by 9]

9x/9 = 90/9

x = 10

Hence: 9.999... = 10

9.999... is the VERY end of monday

10 is the VERY beginning of tuesday

The two are the same point in time :p

So now you can see why I said both. :p

Beat that. :ninja:

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sundayx

i just refer to the time before i sleep a day, so the day starts from when i wake up.

yesterday ----> sleep -----> today

so if im up all night, its the same day.

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