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[new tv] plasma? lcd?

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insanekiwi    0

i am thinking about buying a new tv. i?m considering either a plasma or lcd tv, what is the differenz between these two? what are the atvantages and/or disatvantages of the two mentioned? thanks for any input

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Toxicfume    7

Nice link bangbang, but this made me wonder:

3. Does not perform as well at higher altitudes.
What does that mean? Plasma TV's won't work well if you live on mountains? :s

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bangbang023    31

I'm guessing the lower air pressure may have an affect on the plasma gas cells.

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SonComet    0

Another plasma vs lcd

A forum to look at.

If you are gonna use this for sd (although you have to stretch sd to 16:9 on a plasma to avoid uneven aging of the phosphors) and hdtv and dvds, then get the plasma. If you are gonna be using it with a computer then the lcd is better. Plasmas just offer much better pq than lcd tvs at this point in time. Sure the LED backlights on the sony qualia 005 are interesting, but they run really hot and I don't think you have or want to spend 15k for a 46" lcd tv. People tried to tell me of the wonders of lcd tvs awhile back, and I have to say that after seeing them for myself and extensive research that current lcds leave me very unimpressed. They are gret computer monitors, but not great tvs. Although who knows what the future may hold.

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bangbang023    31

I don't know what LCD's you have seen, but Samsung and Sharp make some very amazing LCD's. Sharp has a 45" set that does 1080p. I was talking to a guy from Sharp and he told me they couldn't make them fast enough to meet the demand for such a high end device. LCD's, if you get a good one, are just better, IMO.

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SonComet    0

Resolution isn't everything. The grayscaling, colors (red shift, grayscale, and color temp are inadequate for a tv that retails for 8K), and black lvls on that 45" sharp are sub par in this price range. It's a good tv, but a 50" panasonic plasma offers a much better overall picture with great grayscaling, black lvls, and color. I think you need to look beyond resolution when looking at tvs, especially lcd models. Also, even after isf calibration that 45" sharp can't perform. Sure it has better black lvls than most other lcds, but they are not near crt quality like the 50" panasonic onyx that it competes against, and due to grayscaling issues (and the others that I mentioned which still persist) its skin tones are unnatural, and not everyone likes the restrictive viewing angles of lcd, dlp, rp lcd, and rp crt tvs. Like I said, I am excited about the potential that LED backlights give to lcd tvs, but until they are the standard I feel that current models a waste of money for normal tv and dvd viewing.

Edited by SonComet

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bangbang023    31
Resolution isn't everything.  The grayscaling, colors (red shift, grayscale, and color temp are inadequate for a tv that retails for 8K), and black lvls on that 45" sharp are sub par in this price range.  It's a good tv, but a 50" panasonic plasma offers a much better overall picture with great grayscaling, black lvls, and color.  I think you need to look beyond resolution when looking at tvs, especially lcd models.  Also, even after isf calibration that 45" sharp can't perform.  Sure it has better black lvls than most other lcds, but they are not near crt quality like the 50" panasonic onyx that it competes against, and due to grayscaling issues (and the others that I mentioned which still persist) its skin tones are unnatural, and not everyone likes the restrictive viewing angles of lcd, dlp, rp lcd, and rp crt tvs.  Like I said, I am excited about the potential that LED backlights give to lcd tvs, but until they are the standard I feel that current models a waste of money for normal tv and dvd viewing.

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The Sharps do lack black levels, but then again the Samsungs don't. They have as good levels as many plasmas and run a lot cooler. On top of that. I don't know what you're talking about, but LCD TV's has basically the same viewing angles as Plasmas while digital projo's tend to reach their limit about 10 degree less at 160.

Plasma is an overrated technology, IMO, and can become restrictive when you want to start doing things like playing video games or using your PC on it. Burn in is still an issue, no matter how much they do to prevent it. On top of that, many midrange sets offer a much shorter lifespan than their LCD counterparts (there are exceptions, such as Pioneer).

Yes, LCD does need to mature more, but a good LCD set will do wonders for people, especially once they connect their PC to it.

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Hypoxiaicon    0

Is burn in really an Issue for 'Normal' Usage?

If you dont hook up your PC then there isnt much of problem.

Unless you leave the same game screen paused for like 3-4 Days then Burn in will occure, same for Teletext etc.

I guess it depends on how much you use it.

For my dad, I recommended Plasma. Simply due to the fact that he watches around 2-3 hours of TV a day and Plays on the Xbox for 3-4 Hours A night.

Plasma for that is fine, Also with that usage most can managed 6-7 years or maybe more.

And If you bought a Cathode Ray TV, after 6-7 years of use they normally pack up for some reason of other.

I do agree with you Bangbang though, LCD does need time to mature, But its will become the better, by far out of Plasma and LCD.

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bangbang023    31

I, working at Best Buy, have had a few complaints from people who said news channel tickers burned their screens. I guess it ultimately comes down to what you plan to do with the set:

Play games, use PC, watch news alot: LCD

Watching high action movies, sports, moderate gaming: Plasma.

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SonComet    0

Ok, first off we have to clear something up. LCDs do not have equal viewing angles as plasmas. They list similar specs but they measure differently. You can see this most apparently buy checking out the vertical viewing angles on the sharp or samsung lcds in relation to a plasma in person (which I think you were the one who worked at best buy, so that should be easy for you). Also, you claim a much shorter lifespan, but newer plasmas have a 60,000 hour half-life which is equal to an lcd tv's bulb. And yes I do realize that you can replace the bulb in the lcd, but if you can afford one of these tvs in the first place then 5-7 years down the line (a long time before the half-life is even close when only watching 8 hours a day) you would most likely drop another 8k on the latest and greatest currently available. So unless you are taking out a loan to pay for it then lifespan is no longer an issue. BTW a typical direct view crt tv has a halflife of 30,000 hours. Also, burn-in may still be an issue, but at this stage if you take a few easy precautions, then you are highly unlikely to burn-in your plasma. It wasn't always like this, but is now.

When plasmas appeared they had horribly grayscales, color reproduction, black lvls, burnt in easily, huge amounts of heat, and short 10,000 hour half-lifes. Now the better ones have near direct view crt black lvls, great color reproduction, grayscales, long lifespans, much lower chance of burn-in, and many newer models operate silently without the need for fans (not true of newer 60-65" models). LCD tvs just don't offer anything for me other than the elimantion of burn-in, and the ability to extend the life by replacing the backlight if I want to use an extremely outdated tv for 20 years.

I just don't understand what makes lcds better at this point in time. Every benefit they have isn't really that big of a benefit, especially when measured against current plasma technology. And I am not sure if I mentioned this yet, but even the samsung's black levels are not near those possible on plasmas or direct view crts. Based on user opinions and reviews it seems that the samsung seems to slightly crush blacks to do as well as it does for an LCD tv.

Also, to add to the list that you made. LCD tvs are better if you like to watch 4:3 content cropped on a widescreen tv. If you watch majority 4:3 content cropped on a plasma then you risk aging the phosphors on the center 4:3 area of the screen more quickly than the phospors on the edges. For that reason I will only play widescreen games and live with stretched sd tv on a plasma. But seeing as how most future games will be 16:9, that shouldn't be that big of a problem for me in the future as I don't really watch enough sd tv for that to bother me.

Oh and one last thing (I love talking about tvs with people, my friends think I'm insane but that's ok :)). The reason why plasmas have almost perfect viewing angles is because each pixel generates its own light. LCDs have much worse viewing angles due to the fact that they only generate light from a few back lights. That's why I'm wondering if LED backlights will help because of the hugely increased number of lights. Also, it may be awhile before LED lit LCDs run cool (the current 46" and 40" sonys that were shown at ces run very very hot).

Edited by SonComet

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u_diddy    0

Why are you considering plasma and lcd when ypu can get dlp's for virtually the same price. They are almost as thin as plasma and lcd but they last as long as crt's. Thepicture quality of dlp's are better with no picture degradation over time. Get a DLP.

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bangbang023    31
Why are you considering plasma and lcd when ypu can get dlp's for virtually the same price. They are almost as thin as plasma and lcd but they last as long as crt's. Thepicture quality of dlp's are better with no picture degradation over time. Get a DLP.

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1) DLP's are much cheaper

2) DLP's are no where near as thin as a flat panel

3) DLP's suffer from short light bulb life span resulting in higher maintanence cost than either a plasma or LCD.

I prefer digital projo, but all 3 facts you presented are wrong.

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Jason S.    1,495

ive heard that plasma's only last 4-5 years... short lifespan. wouldnt stop me from buying one though.

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u_diddy    0
1) DLP's are much cheaper

2) DLP's are no where near as thin as a flat panel

3) DLP's suffer from short light bulb life span resulting in higher maintanence cost than either a plasma or LCD.

I prefer digital projo, but all 3 facts you presented are wrong.

585722537[/snapback]

meh?

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bangbang023    31
meh?

585722645[/snapback]

what's not to understand. You gave incorrect information and I corrected it.

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digistil    0
ive heard that plasma's only last 4-5 years... short lifespan.  wouldnt stop me from buying one though.

585722562[/snapback]

I've heard the same...it would absolutely keep me from buying one.

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bangbang023    31

Depends on the plasma. Pioneer guarantees, or at least they did, that their Elites will last 20 years, in terms of the gas.

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u_diddy    0

1) DLP vs. LCD vs. LCOS Rear Projection Televisions

This is where the competition gets interesting. This is essentially a battle between Texas Instruments, Intel and all of the LCD manufacturers (Sony, Philips, Toshiba, Samsung). Many companies are hedging their bets on this one (Samsung manufactures all 3), however the real winner will be the one who can produce the best picture at the lowest cost. My bet is on DLP or LCOS. DLP is currently in its third iteration (HD2+) and will have its fourth generation product (xHD3) out, or at least announced, by the end of the year. The advances in DLP both current and forthcoming are exceptional, but so is Intel?s LCOS chip which is essentially a densely-packed LCD ? creating a finer picture without any of the ?screen door? artifacts found in many LCD displays. Intel has claimed that LCOS will enable 50-inch HDTV displays for less than $2,000 within a year.

LCD rear projection does have some advantages, however. It is being developed further and further and will benefit from rapid price drops as manufacturing ramps up and technologies improve. Right now you can find large, HD-ready LCD-based RPTVs for under $1500. A similar DLP or LCOS version (currently) will cost you at least $1000 more.

2)LCD 2"

Plasma 4-6"

DLP 7"-Whatever (I never said they were as thin as a flat panel, you can't hang a DLP on a wall, but they also aren't anywhere near as big as say a projection. I'd say a matter of a few inches is pretty close).

3) I was under the impression the bulb life was longer. I read about 8-10k. Plasma 25-30k and lcd 50-75k (RP LCD about 8-10k also).

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bangbang023    31
1) DLP vs. LCD vs. LCOS Rear Projection Televisions

This is where the competition gets interesting. This is essentially a battle between Texas Instruments, Intel and all of the LCD manufacturers (Sony, Philips, Toshiba, Samsung). Many companies are hedging their bets on this one (Samsung manufactures all 3), however the real winner will be the one who can produce the best picture at the lowest cost. My bet is on DLP or LCOS. DLP is currently in its third iteration (HD2+) and will have its fourth generation product (xHD3) out, or at least announced, by the end of the year. The advances in DLP both current and forthcoming are exceptional, but so is Intel?s LCOS chip which is essentially a densely-packed LCD ? creating a finer picture without any of the ?screen door? artifacts found in many LCD displays. Intel has claimed that LCOS will enable 50-inch HDTV displays for less than $2,000 within a year.

LCD rear projection does have some advantages, however. It is being developed further and further and will benefit from rapid price drops as manufacturing ramps up and technologies improve. Right now you can find large, HD-ready LCD-based RPTVs for under $1500. A similar DLP or LCOS version (currently) will cost you at least $1000 more.

2)LCD 2"

  Plasma 4-6"

  DLP 7"-Whatever (I never said they were as thin as a flat panel, you can't hang a DLP on a wall, but they also aren't anywhere near as big as say a projection. I'd say a matter of a few inches is pretty close).

3) I was under the impression the bulb life was longer. I read about 8-10k. Plasma 25-30k and lcd 50-75k (RP LCD about 8-10k also).

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Normal DLP's are 14" and deeper usually. Still much smaller than rear projos, but no where near as thin as you would make them seem. RCA does have one 7" set out there but it is also quite expensive.

DLP bulbs last, generally, 8,000 hours which, on average household viewing, equates to 2 and a half years. LCOS is, indeed, a very nice technology that has had a very slow takeoff in the projection TV market, although it is very popular within the projector arena.

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SonComet    0

LCOS has been awful in jvc's tvs, don't know about that mitsu lcos model, and I've heard great things about the qualia 006 (but all I have to go on are consumer reviews. Although I haven't really searched for any professional ones, heh). I just hope that sony releases an lcos model 50" or smaller sometime in the next year or so :).

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bangbang023    31
LCOS has been awful in jvc's tvs, don't know about that mitsu lcos model, and I've heard great things about the qualia 006 (but all I have to go on are consumer reviews.  Although I haven't really searched for any professional ones, heh).  I just hope that sony releases an lcos model 50" or smaller sometime in the next year or so :).

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The problem with the JVC implementation is that they modified it and included a lamp amplifier so the picture is overly bright and is very grainy. I have no idea how they managed to alter the technology so much that they butchered it, but they did.

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Bhav    18
ive heard that plasma's only last 4-5 years... short lifespan.  wouldnt stop me from buying one though.

585722562[/snapback]

isn't that because you have the refill the gas or something? i think it's 7 years though.

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insanekiwi    0

alright cool. thanks for all the replies folks.

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