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Xcode - Worth Learning?

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DjmUK    0

I'm primarily a web programmer, but all this talk about how easy Xcode is, and of course it's the recommended language in Apple's pages. I don't own a mac yet, but I plan on getting an Intel Mac mini when available (I have the time to save up).

But would it be worth learning, and if so - for what purpose? oh, is this used to create Dashboard Widgets (because I wouldn't mind learning how to write those), unless Applescript is used to write them. (then again, Applescript vs Xcode)

To Sum Up

- Worth learning Xcode 2.0/1 for my limited purposes

- What can Xcode create

- Dashboard Widget programming language

- Applescript vs Xcode

Thanks in advance.

P.S.

I have searched Apple's website but I'm not entirely clear. Also, sorry for all the questions.

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Southern Patriot    912

To sum up your questions:

1. XCode can be used to write dashboard widgets, but from what I understand it's not required for that.

2. XCode is an IDE for programming a variety of languages (even AppleScript). It's not a language itself.

XCode is in a way the Mac equivalent of Visual Studio on Windows, with the added advantage that it is free.

The best thing for you to do would be to sign up for a free developer account at Apple Developer Connection. You can get lots of good information there.

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DjmUK    0

Don't I have to pay for ADC membership?

So, Xcode is Visual Studio...if that's the case, then what language is used: C/C++ ?

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the evn show    138
Don't I have to pay for ADC membership?

So, Xcode is Visual Studio...if that's the case, then what language is used: C/C++ ?

586047264[/snapback]

XCode is just an IDE and much like Visual Studio you can use any one of a dozens of languages.

I've used it to write PHP, others use it for Python. The most common languages used to create

Mac OS X applications (and by extension the most popular languages for use with XCode) are:

  • Objective-C
  • Objective-C++
  • C++
  • Java
  • AppleScript

You create the interface for a Dashboard widget using HTML, CSS and Javascript. Javascript

widgets have hooks so that they can call on functionality from Cocoa objects or shell scripts so

you could use XCode to create them too.

This question is a lot like asking "What program do you use to create a document?" It really

depends on what you're trying to accomplish. You wouldn't use XCode to create something like

TV-tracker, but you might find it easier if you wanted to make Airport Control or a BlueTooth file

exchange widget.

If you want to write software for OS X on Intel then the only reasonable choice at this time is to

use XCode. If you just want to make web pages (which is what dashboard widgets are) then you

probably don't need to. You wouldn't just be learning the IDE you'd also have to pick up OOP.

AppleScript can be used in XCode to create full featured applications because there are full Cocoa

bindings for AppleScript. Most users will access AppleScript through the script editor. It's

powerful enough for the simple workflow automation that AppleScript was designed for and it

features interface recording/playback.

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Southern Patriot    912
Don't I have to pay for ADC membership?

586047264[/snapback]

No, not for basic use. You simply create an account, but don't buy one of the memberships. That will still give you access to some of the downloads, such as documentation, example code, and XCode updates. You don't even have to create an account if you just want to look at the Reference Library there.

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DjmUK    0

Thanks the evn show & roadwarrior, that's a lot of help. I'll sign up for the basic ADC tomorrow and look at the options :)

Javascript's the only language I've avoided, I've learned ASP, PHP, MySQL, (X)/D/HTML & CSS. I guess JS will be the next language to learn (possibly along side AppleScript) and then compiling in Xcode :D

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Wizz    0

I have to say I gave XCode 2.1 a go yesterday and made myself a Cocoa-Java currency converter using the tutorial included in the documentation. I've got previous experience in C# so I picked up the syntax pretty easily. Xcode is a nice and easy environment to use.

I even ticked the little box so now it should run on MacOS X for Intel as well :D.

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DjmUK    0
I have to say I gave XCode 2.1 a go yesterday and made myself a Cocoa-Java currency converter using the tutorial included in the documentation. I've got previous experience in C# so I picked up the syntax pretty easily. Xcode is a nice and easy environment to use.

I even ticked the little box so now it should run on MacOS X for Intel as well :D.

586053543[/snapback]

Nice! shame my first mac won't be until Intel Mac mini...but by that time JavaScript should be in my head.

P.S.

Your first universal binary program :) however, don't suppose you can test the Intel version - but hey, there are extremely few programs out there by 3rd party's that are U.B's, and you're now one of them :D

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rajputwarrior    280

if you are a student the $99US ADC membership is more then worth it

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Southern Patriot    912
Nice! shame my first mac won't be until Intel Mac mini...but by that time JavaScript should be in my head.

P.S.

Your first universal binary program :) however, don't suppose you can test the Intel version - but hey, there are extremely few programs out there by 3rd party's that are U.B's, and you're now one of them :D

586053879[/snapback]

I have a custom version of the Halime newsreader that I was playing around with the other night that is now a Universal Binary. Of course, I can't test it right now, but I do have it.

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maxsquared    0

From my understand, xcode is an IDE it's not a programming language, so I don't think you can learn it. (by saying that, you can always learn how to use a software, in that case, xcode is pretty easy to learn)

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