Gentoo


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Tim Dorr

awesome! looks really cool. Maybe I'll give it a go when i get back to school...

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kairon

Hm, gentoo looks nice so i just picked up the 135 MB ISO they've got, one Q before i test install in a virtual machine before moving on to dual booting XP w/ gentoo:

when it says stuff about adding lines or editing lines in files, do you just type the command it says or do u have to load a notepad program?because it skips that part..

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karmakillernz
Originally posted by kairon

Hm, gentoo looks nice so i just picked up the 135 MB ISO they've got, one Q before i test install in a virtual machine before moving on to dual booting XP w/ gentoo:

when it says stuff about adding lines or editing lines in files, do you just type the command it says or do u have to load a notepad program?because it skips that part..

Most of the time you'll need to use the included program 'nano'

So just type nano -w /etc/fstab (Or whatever). THe -w means dont word wrap as that can stuff the files up.

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kairon
Originally posted by karmakillernz

Most of the time you'll need to use the included program 'nano'

So just type nano -w /etc/fstab (Or whatever). THe -w means dont word wrap as that can stuff the files up.

and when i type nano -w I can freely edit the file and hit backspace to delete for example and type in new stuff that i need to?

then how do i save ?

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neowin_hipster
Originally posted by timdorr

awesome! looks really cool. Maybe I'll give it a go when i get back to school...

Makes the most highly optimized and compact system possible. Totally customized and l337 too. Gentoo is a species of penguin that is small and quick.

Chris says it takes like hours and hours to install though :(

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karmakillernz
Originally posted by kairon

and when i type nano -w I can freely edit the file and hit backspace to delete for example and type in new stuff that i need to?

then how do i save ?

Okay, its one of the easier console text editors ive used. To save, just hit CTRL & O, to exit CTRL & X.

Its all written down the bottom. And yes, just backspace and type whatever you want :)

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karmakillernz
Originally posted by Goalie_CA

Makes the most highly optimized and compact system possible. Totally customized and l337 too. Gentoo is a species of penguin that is small and quick.

Chris says it takes like hours and hours to install though :(

Yes. It can take longer depending. Since it compiles everything for optimum performance, it can take a while. (nearly 15 hours on mine - that was on the small ISO)

There are two ISO's. One is a 15mb one, the other is a 138mb one. THe 15 mb one is just a very basic boot up one. It then downloads the very latest files off the net and installs them.

The 138mb one has the base system, minus X and Gnome/KDE etc. From there you just build on it.

If you use the 138mb iso though, once you've finished installing do a:

emerge --update world

to get your system updated to the newest packages. :)

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lazydesert

wow

this is too complicated for my lack of brains :ermm: ;)

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trpn

hey ...

i have been hearing a lot about this distro lately ... anyone that has tried it ... please tell me what makes it better.. I know it is configured for your particular system at install (thats why it takes so long and makes it quicker when using) ... but what is it based on ? rh? deb? basically i would like to know if i struggle through the install and get it to run, what will make it better than suse or mandrake or red hat or debian ... etc

I have tried the three major rpm based distro's above (s,rh, man) but i didn;t like them .. what would seperate this one?

thanks

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karmakillernz
Originally posted by trpn

hey ...

i have been hearing a lot about this distro lately ... anyone that has tried it ... please tell me what makes it better.. I know it is configured for your particular system at install (thats why it takes so long and makes it quicker when using) ... but what is it based on ? rh? deb? basically i would like to know if i struggle through the install and get it to run, what will make it better than suse or mandrake or red hat or debian ... etc

I have tried the three major rpm based distro's above (s,rh, man) but i didn;t like them .. what would seperate this one?

thanks

Ok. Well what makes it better for me is that its fast, VERY customisable and very slim (you dont install ANYTHING you dont want). I don't like the big distro's (Suse, Mandrake, Redhat) because they are slow and, again, for me they're annoying as they try to hold your hand too much.

Gentoo isnt based off any other distro, it packaging system is called 'portage'. Its based off the Ports idea with FreeBSD.

For example: if you wanted to install Abiword for example you would type this:

emerge abiword

That would check dependencies, download abiword plus any necessery dependoncies and compiles them all. Very easy, and since its all compiled from scratch for your system its also very fast to use. Of course you can install rpm (emerge rpm ;)) and install RPM's as you would with Mandrake/Redhat etc but I prefer to compile all the software I use to get that speed advantage.

Also, another thing I like is that Gentoo is VERY up to date. A day or two after packages come out theres a new ebuild (thats the instructions telling it where do get the file, how to compile it etc) up.

Hope that helps :)

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Randy026

You guys should try Sorcerer too, see DistroWatch.com , the only bad thing about Gentoo is that when you remove something it doesn't recompile it's deps. so then the program won't work. because if you have a optional program then it will automaticly compile support for it. and if you remove that program that it depends on then it won't work right. But other than that they both are kick ass distros.

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DrunkenMaster

I just don't like the Idea of them making the ISOs with only the core system and then having to download all the source files from the Net afterward - its such an inefficient system. You're prob best to install the core system from another, more reliable and trusted distribution, IMHO, and then re-compile the more demanding software like X, KDE, Gnome, Apache, mySql, etc. This will save a lot more time.

I wouldn't recommend doing a source complie of X unless you have a fast machine or a lot of patience. Anything below a PIII with tons of Ram and you'll be waitin a long time.

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kairon
Originally posted by DrunkenMaster

I just don't like the Idea of them making the ISOs with only the core system and then having to download all the source files from the Net afterward - its such an inefficient system. You're prob best to install the core system from another, more reliable and trusted distribution, IMHO, and then re-compile the more demanding software like X, KDE, Gnome, Apache, mySql, etc. This will save a lot more time.

I wouldn't recommend doing a source complie of X unless you have a fast machine or a lot of patience. Anything below a PIII with tons of Ram and you'll be waitin a long time.

Can't you just skip to the precompiled stage 3 tarball? :p

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Tim Dorr

how does emerge compare with app-get (if at all)?

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karmakillernz
Originally posted by kairon

Can't you just skip to the precompiled stage 3 tarball? :p

Exactly... ;)

The reason it gets everything off the net is so you have an up to date system, no packages are outdated.

Originally posted by timdorr

how does emerge compare with app-get (if at all)?

Well the way basic way it works is very similar, just the way it goes about it is different. Where apt get fetches binaries, portage (emerge) fetches source code and compiles it instead. You can set up a local mirror if you want - by default it gets all its files from the ibiblio.org servers, and if it cant get it from there, it tries each server in the mirror list. :)

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trpn

ok i can see why this would be better than rpm based distro's... now, about that install ... i have to use pppoe... i have a feeling that will be a prob if i am trying to use emerge during the install.. any tips on that?

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karmakillernz
Originally posted by trpn

ok i can see why this would be better than rpm based distro's... now, about that install ... i have to use pppoe... i have a feeling that will be a prob if i am trying to use emerge during the install.. any tips on that?

Take a look at this thread:

http://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic.php?t=5244

Or, go to Gentoo forums and search for pppoe and look at some of the others. It has been done, I just havnt done it myself. :)

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Vlad
Originally posted by DrunkenMaster

I just don't like the Idea of them making the ISOs with only the core system and then having to download all the source files from the Net afterward - its such an inefficient system. You're prob best to install the core system from another, more reliable and trusted distribution, IMHO, and then re-compile the more demanding software like X, KDE, Gnome, Apache, mySql, etc. This will save a lot more time.

I wouldn't recommend doing a source complie of X unless you have a fast machine or a lot of patience. Anything below a PIII with tons of Ram and you'll be waitin a long time.

Like other people have said, it's to keep the system as up to date as possible. Part of the appeal of Gentoo is to be at the "bleeding edge" of linux, while maintaining high performance and (at least some) stability. You can also compile packages, then build packaged binaries (no more compiling needed) for your own purposes.

Yes, the installation of a full desktop-ready system takes a while, especially on slower machines. But then, that's what sleeping is for, right? I install the base system, download the source files for the software I want, start compiling and crash for the night.

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kairon

Heh, I like Gentoo.I skipped to stage 3 tarball though ,oh well.It's nice and the instructions are newbie friendly. Now to recompile my kernel for OSS Sound so i can get my damn sound working:P

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  • 4 weeks later...
lx qu33n

so is this a ditro you would recommend to a novice/moderate linux user... im past newbie but not anywhere near expert like i am at windows. i would like to dual boot with this and i was wondering if anyone could tell me just how to do that even though i have readme's but i would rather have a first-had account of someone i can talk to about it and is knowledgeable.

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neowin_hipster

If you're looking for an intermediate distro, slackware or suse is the way to go. Mandrake is definently for n00bs. I do know some total linux n00bs who've, with some patience and friends, gotten gentoo to work.

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divinatum

w00 it took me 4 days to fully install gentoo.. just to b0rk it the next day :ponder:

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lx qu33n

ok, thx for replying. i have tried... redhat, mandrake, caldera, beOS (different than linux) and i have tried FreeBSD.... the one i liked the best was redhat... so i think i will try slackware now. thx for your time and input.

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