New IE 7 Icon and Logo


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DarkCircuit
Very nice icon, too bad I'll be removing it and replacing it with a firefox icons on every single one of my customer's computers that comes in through my doors.

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If you did that to mine, and I was a customer, Id kick your ass. :ninja:

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wcitech

Customer, I would explain to you first why your computer was in my shop in the first place. My average repair bill is from $80-$100. Since about 80% of the time it is BECAUSE of IE that they had to bring their computer in to me in the first place, the response is never "I'll kick your ass" :ninja: but "Thanks for showing me the light, now I'll be safe from Spyware/Adware" :yes:

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DarkCircuit

Umm.. 80% of people that come in to your shop pay you THAT for removing crapware that they have not because of I.E., but because they dont know how to install a firewall / anti-spyware program?

I would be like, dude ... are you dumb? I asked you to fix my computer, not put this crappy fox on my desktop. Cmere punk.

:laugh:

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Pink Floyd

that is a very nice logo with effects.

good work ms (Y)

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megamanXplosion
Customer, I would explain to you first why your computer was in my shop in the first place. My average repair bill is from $80-$100. Since about 80% of the time it is BECAUSE of IE that they had to bring their computer in to me in the first place, the response is never "I'll kick your ass"? but "Thanks for showing me the light, now I'll be safe from Spyware/Adware"

May I introduce you to the concept of restricted privileges? 80% of the problems are because of the users running programs, like Internet Explorer and other internet-facing software, with administrator privileges. That is the true source of evil. It is easy to secure Internet Explorer (and other internet-facing programs.) First you need a .reg file to enable the "Basic User" privilege level (which prevents programs with this privilege level from altering the System32 directory, from altering the Program Files directory, altering global registry settings, etc.) Then you can simply import another .reg file to apply that privilege level to many of the internet-facing programs that are out there.

Once you have Internet Explorer running under basic user privileges, place some of the most commonly-known sites that require the ability to use activeX in a safe and responsible manner (Windows Update, Microsoft Update, Trend Micro, etc.) into the Trusted Sites list.

If you have the knowledge to export from the registry, then you can learn how to apply them manually here (Browsing the Web and Reading E-mail Safely as an Administrator, Part 2) and you can export the results from the registry to easily apply to other computers (I would recommend doing this even if you do install Firefox for them, and I would apply the privileges to Firefox as well since it has absolutely no use for administrative privileges as far as I know.)

I feel that it is important that you leave Internet Explorer open to people. You can effectively secure IE6 and Internet Explorer 7 will be dramatically more secure in comparison. Spoofing and phishing are about the only real flaws in Internet Explorer under the basic user privilege level since most vulnerabilities require active scripting and activeX object installations and the others rely on the user being uninformed (spoofing and phishing.) Internet Explorer 7 has been massively improved in fighting spoofing and phishing attempts (no longer possible to hide the address of a site, padlock has been moved to the top of the interface to grab the user's attention easier, contains anti-phishing detection that warns you when a site *might* be trying to trick you, and contains anti-phishing filters that block sites that are known to be malicious. Under Windows Vista, Internet Explorer 7 restricts its privileges much further than the method I've shown you (it cannot do this in Windows XP and previous versions because they do not support least-privilege user access.)

There's no reason to not put Internet Explorer 7 on machines, or to remove it from them. You have to keep your customers in mind, they may not be the only people who use the computer. Take me, for instance, my 2nd computer is used by the whole family, including my parents, and they are frustrated when they do not see the familiar "e" on the desktop - they don't want to learn a new program, they do not want to be forcefully converted to another program, they just want to use the computer like they always have. Hiding Internet Explorer from your customers is bad because it introduces unnecessary frustration.

Edited by megamanXplosion
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wcitech
Umm.. 80% of people that come in to your shop pay you THAT for removing crapware that they have not because of I.E., but because they dont know how to install a firewall / anti-spyware program?

I would be like, dude ... are you dumb? I asked you to fix my computer, not put this crappy fox on my desktop. Cmere punk.

:laugh:

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If I removed the problems but didn't provide an efficient means to prevent them in the future, they'd be back in two months. In that case, I'd be a con-artist, not a technician.

I always explain what firefox is, why the should use it, and how to access IE just incase they decide not to take my advice.

If you are denying that the fox isn't a whole lot more secure (and all around better) than Ignorant Explorer (6!), you're just being a zealot.

There's no reason to not put Internet Explorer 7 on machines, or to remove it from them. You have to keep your customers in mind, they may not be the only people who use the computer. Take me, for instance, my 2nd computer is used by the whole family, including my parents, and they are frustrated when they do not see the familiar "e" on the desktop - they don't want to learn a new program, they do not want to be forcefully converted to another program, they just want to use the computer like they always have. Hiding Internet Explorer from your customers is bad because it introduces unnecessary frustration.

You're right about this. In many instances I will re-arrange firefox and skin it to look just like IE, keeping the customer in mind. There has been a time or two when I've even switched it to the IE icon. However, I do always explain it, and for a year now people have been greatful 100% of the time.

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DarkCircuit

Lol! Read above. My thoughts exactly. True though, ahaha .. noobs dont secure IE for the most part, but Im no zealot. Ive broken every browser that is out there in my own testing.

IE6 can be secure if you know how to configure it correctly. Instead of configuring it correctly however, you choose to do THIS!

"You're right about this. In many instances I will re-arrange firefox and skin it to look just like IE, keeping the customer in mind. There has been a time or two when I've even switched it to the IE icon. However, I do always explain it, and for a year now people have been greatful 100% of the time. "

Man ... that sort of IS being a con artist.

If I got my laptop back, saw an IE icon, clicked on it, and then saw a stupid foxes face, I think I really WOULD kick your ass. Lol! :laugh:

Why dont .. lol... you just ahah.. harden I.E. and patch the holes properly?

That should stop any repeat business you get? :yes:

EDIT: BTW ...

3lm0mmx3vl.jpg

Edited by DarkCircuit
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FlibbyFlobby

@wcitech I think getting customers to run Firefox as well as IE is good, however making one look like the other is a bit lame, even if you are telling them. Why not just give them a quick 10 minute outline of the basics of why you need Firefox and IE on your system, that way they have the knowledge and understanding. This is the biggest problem I see these days, people who arent computer literate are just pushed out the door being told they need this and need that, without reasoning. I think more people need empower them somewhat by giving them the knowledge to make their own choices. (Btw: 80 - 100$ to clean spyware? :s)

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alsheron
Actually ... after looking at it for a bit, and putting it on the Desktop, ...

I dunno ... kind of looks ok.

Catches the eye ... just looks a little like ... NASA, or, .. I dunno, they need to turn down the orange tone a bit .. hrmm ...

Still ugly, but not so ugly that I wont use it because it's new. Lol.

desktopie3yo.jpg

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What are the other icons you're using there on your desktop? Where can you get them?

Thanks!

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DarkCircuit
What are the other icons you're using there on your desktop? Where can you get them?

Thanks!

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They are in Windows Vista. :p

Edit: You can however get a few of them by downloading an icon pack (google it), or for fun try the Longhorn Transformation Pack v 10 from softpedia.com.

Run that, and only choose to change the icons.

Your welcome. ;)

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radioboy

so this makes the new features in longhorn:

new IE logo

DRM to protect the logo

AWESOME

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Antaris
"Since Firefox is still buggy with many websites" - what crack are you smoking?  Maybe you haven't heard of something called web standards, but Firefox is more supportive of them than IE will ever be.  The whole campaign to market Firefox as a better Internet browser is from the standpoint that it is in conjuction with web standards and offers better security.  Show me proof that Firefox is not more secure, doesn't support web standards, and, not to mention, doesn't offer a numerous amount of features that IE doesn't have (Some to name: extensions, themes, download manager). 

Firefox is the basis for the browser of the future, not IE.  And do you know why?  Because it is in agreement with the progression of web development.  IE7 has just recently jumped on the bandwagon of tabbed browsing and numerous other features, which may I remind you have already been incorporated into other ones such as FF, Opera, and Maxthon.  This just goes to show that MS has overestimated their tactics with IE; they had to ressurect the development of IE just to keep their share of the market.  Pretty sad if you ask me.

This is not just a browser war; it is a war between the development of the Internet and the development of a commercially marketable product that appeals to the masses (IE).  Firefox is on the Internet's side, and are numerous other applications, companies, and individuals.  Who is Microsoft of not offer everything it possibly can to the surfers of the Internet?  Why should Microsoft deprieve surfers of security, standarization, and so much more?  Because all they want to do is make some money, keep up it's share of the market, and make sure to crush the competition all while inhibiting the growth and experience of the Internet.

The facts have been presented numerous times over; Firefox is more secure, but it, as well as others (don't make this seem like a FF vs. IE fight), is a newborn in a world of one adult who has to be nursed over time and time again to keep up with the competition (competition which includes both surfers and hackers).  Firefox is everything IE has been, is, and will be because it is only a newborn at a critical growing stage of its life where bullies will stop at nothing to keep it down at the bottom.

Is this post biased?  No, not one bit.  I use IE and Firefox (IE on one PC, FF on the other), but I also have experienced first hand how vulnerable IE is compared to Firefox when the PC using IE gets popups and viruses.  Firefox gives me a better experience with the web, but as a web designer, I have to develop pages that work the same in both.  Ah, the woes of developing a web standards compliant website that looks as it should in IE...not much fun.  Simply put, I use both, but FF has hands down proven itself to be better for me, and as a businessman, my clients as well.  You decide which is better for you, everyone else, and the Internet.

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What the funking-wangles has that got to do with the new IE icon??

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Guol

to all the dear people in this thread having a browser war: there are many other forums out there...so quit spamming this forum and go tell someone who cares

to the sane people here: i reckon the icon looks pretty slick, and in fact microsoft are doing a great job. keep it up MS ;)

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DarkCircuit
to all the dear people in this thread having a browser war: there are many other forums out there...so quit spamming this forum and go tell someone who cares

to the sane people here: i reckon the icon looks pretty slick, and in fact microsoft are doing a great job. keep it up MS  ;)

586379383[/snapback]

Right right ...

take it outside. Agreed.

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RudyJ

Looks quite nice actually ...on a dark background :) post-52372-1124106933_thumb.jpg

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Sonic2k

What i dont understand is why the change from Microsoft Internet Explorer to Windows Internet Explorer

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wcitech
(Btw: 80 - 100$ to clean spyware? :s)

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Sorry man but if you think $80 is too expensive to

a) clean up viruses

b) clean up spyware

c) install adequate protection

d) install all avalible Windows security updates

e) train the user on keeping their computer secure in the future

then you're either

a) ten years old and $80 seems like a lot of money

b) live in a town with a population of 200 where ma and pa stores will do almost everythign for cheap

c) just plain have NO IDEA what you're talking about.

Most computer stores in my small town charge $65-90 / hr, which is cheaper than you'll find in most cities. My rate is $40 in-house and $50 on-site, which has been accepted by my community with open arms.

Okay, I'm done with my ranting on this subject, reply as you wish.

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Ar3s

this actually looks quite good compared to the others i seen. :)

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FlibbyFlobby
Sorry man but if you think $80 is too expensive to

a) clean up viruses

b) clean up spyware

c) install adequate protection

d) install all avalible Windows security updates

e) train the user on keeping their computer secure in the future

then you're either

a) ten years old and $80 seems like a lot of money

b) live in a town with a population of 200 where ma and pa stores will do almost everythign for cheap

c) just plain have NO IDEA what you're talking about.

Most computer stores in my small town charge $65-90 / hr, which is cheaper than you'll find in most cities.  My rate is $40 in-house and $50 on-site, which has been accepted by my community with open arms.

Okay, I'm done with my ranting on this subject, reply as you wish.

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I wouldnt say $80 was expensive if it wasnt for that fact that doing all of that (including removing viruses fully from the registry) is just really really easy and definately not $80 worth of work, hence why I said it.

Ontopic: Anyone know if they will be rebranding the interface like they did with XP with the new icons etc, or are we just gonna get XP icons?

Edited by ziadoz
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wcitech
I wouldnt say $80 was expensive if it wasnt for that fact that doing all of that (including removing viruses fully from the registry) is just really really easy and definately not $80 worth of work, hence why I said it.

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Maybe to you and I, but we're geeks. Some people can take apart cars, some people can take apart computers, some people can take apart humans.

The customers that _I_ deal with are usually between 40-60 years old and have difficulty double clicking. I'm their PC doctor and mechanic. When I started in the business I was $25/hr and I actually lost customers because they suspected that I provided unsatisfactory service for such a price.

And I think ALL the icons will be changed.

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THE BAT

Looks Very Nice

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fuBar.

Some of the written posts are well said and a good read.

But many people here, you are just arguing about one damn icon change for Internet Explorer.

Please grow up

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umar7001

Well...that new icon looks great! I certainly like it a lot better than the one Beta 1 was released with.

Does anyone know yet if Outlook Express 7 (provided there will be one?) is going to have a new icon and logo as well?

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AnimeUSA
so this makes the new features in longhorn:

new IE logo

DRM to protect the logo

AWESOME

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:yes:

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Denis W.
so this makes the new features in longhorn:

new IE logo

DRM to protect the logo

AWESOME

586379294[/snapback]

Right. Next time please include the 98% of new features you completely missed. :rolleyes:

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