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Old Man Pickle

Nexus 5 (running CM11 with Nova Launcher)

Wallpaper from mantia.me

Icons are call Voxel

 

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giannisgx89

Nexus 5

CM11 Latest Nightly

Dashclock Widget

Nova Launcher

Morena - Flat Icon Pack (wall included in the pack) Download: http://goo.gl/eRnMhT

 

2u7vsb8.png

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beanboy89

azg0d95.png

Nexus 7. CM11. Google Experience Launcher. Chronus Widget.

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uberjon

Samsung Galaxy Note 2 (N7100) on Stock 4.3

ZfBOzzg.png

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
beanboy89

ouTP0kW.png

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  • 3 weeks later...
Redmak

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+Heartripper

WP_20140416.png

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AsherGZ

Aq3etaG.jpg

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AsherGZ

Going for a little Android look on my Lumia!

 

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Geoffrey B.

Windows Phone 8.1 (Dev Preview)

Nokia Lumia 928

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Redmak

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Geoffrey B.

Nokia Lumia 928

Windows Phone 8.1 Dev Preview

 

post-120066-0-60622900-1398278036.png

 

I have attached the wallpaper as well if anyone else wants it.. i found it on wallbase.cc

post-120066-0-90060900-1398278193.jpg

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beanboy89

Just got a Nexus 5!

 

Yd6pAx5.png

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benthebear

Photo%20May%2001,%208%2056%2025%20PM.png

 

Getting jealous of the Windows Phone 8.1 screenshots. It's probably time for me to switch back to Windows Phone. 

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+Frank B.

Setting up my new gadget. Yes, the SIM card is still in the old phone.

 

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+Frank B.

Fully configured it looks like this:

 

Go0hiKX.jpg

 

Phone model: Sony Xperia Z2

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david

Device: Nexus 4

ROM: SlimKat (4.4.2 KitKat)

Kernel: FK.204 with OTG

Launcher: Nova Prime

Video of home screen: https://vidd.me/WRu

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RadishTM

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Jamushroom

Got my iPad Air around January but never actually posted a screenshot of it. So here are my first two, with my own custom-made wallpaper!

iPad_Air_09-05-2014-Lock.png

iPad_Air_09-05-2014-Home.png

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+Frank B.

As it turns out the Google Now launcher works on the Xperia Z2, despite the Play Store claiming it's not compatible.

 

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+Heartripper

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    • By Rich Woods
      It's OK that Qualcomm didn't announce a new chip for Windows at Snapdragon Summit
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      This year, Qualcomm's Snapdragon Technology Summit was held as a digital-only experience, thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic. Journalists like myself would rather be in Maui right now, as it's all the more depressing to look at my "on this day" memories from the last few years.

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      Qualcomm isn't ignoring it
      Qualcomm isn't ignoring Apple's switch to ARM. In fact, it's said a few times that Apple's switch to ARM sort of legitimizes ARM PCs, reaffirming Qualcomm's idea that we don't need Intel to have a great PC experience.

      I do understand the sentiment. Qualcomm has talked about Windows on ARM at Snapdragon Summit for the last four years, just like it talked up mixed reality last year. And in case you're wondering, it's not giving up on mixed reality either. It's just a shorter conference this year since it's not being held in-person. Day one is always a high-level vision keynote, day two is a deep dive on Qualcomm's flagship product (the smartphone chipset), and day three is anything else it wants to show off. There's just no day three this year.

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      Don't expect Qualcomm to compete with this in the foreseeable future. The company is playing to its strengths right now, and trying to gain bits of the market in areas where it can. Again, things might be different if Microsoft could somehow make a top-down decision that all PCs going forward would have ARM64 processors, but it can't.

      Don't forget about Chrome OS
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      And it seems as though the Snapdragon 7c and Chrome OS were made for each other. There have been plenty of ARM-powered Chromebooks in the past, so there aren't any compatibility issues, and Android apps run just fine on Snapdragon chips, obviously. Add cellular to the mix on a browser-based operating system, and it looks pretty good.

      Chrome OS is also a very light operating system, needing fewer resources than Windows or macOS. Comparing any silicon on a Chromebook to Apple's M1 on a MacBook is like comparing apples to, well, Apples.

      Qualcomm still needs to step it up
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      In the Windows world, ARM PCs are positioned almost like they're not real PCs. I remember when the first Windows on ARM PCs shipped; tablets like HP's Envy x2 also had an Intel variant. HP told me at the time that you get the Intel one if you want a PC-like experience, and you get the ARM one if you want an iPad-like experience.

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      Looking back at my editorial from May though, I did say that Microsoft and Qualcomm will be able to learn from how Apple implements ARM, not that they would be prepared for it ahead of time. And I have no doubt that Qualcomm is taking notes not just on what Apple is doing, but on how the public is responding to it.

    • By indospot
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