How to enable the root account in Ubuntu


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Agnes Leroy

Ubuntu is one of the few Linux distributions out there that will not enable the root account.In case you want to enable root login on your Ubuntu system this post will show you how you can do that.

As you have noticed during the Ubuntu installation there was no question about the root password,as you might have been used to see during other Linux distributioninstallation process. This is why the root account is inactive andcan?t be used (no password configured) until we will setup a properpassword for it. To do this, we simply need to run:

sudo passwd root

This will ask for a new root password and once you confirm it, you can start using the root account to login.

In case you will want tdisable back the root accounb>t, just lock the root account by running:

sudo passwd -l root

Are you aware of any other Linux distribution that doesn?t enablethe root account at installation time? I am just curious because Ibelieve that this is a great idea? but I haven?t seen it implemented inother distributions.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Quillz

Thanks, this was a useful how-to. Although I've found that with Ubuntu, you really don't need to create a root user, since you can just use sudo.

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Phixion
Thanks, this was a useful how-to. Although I've found that with Ubuntu, you really don't need to create a root user, since you can just use sudo.

Distro's don't run as root as standard because its pointless and dangerous. A big plus in Linux is the security, if you run as root you throw that security down the drain :)

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  • 2 months later...
Quillz
Distro's don't run as root as standard because its pointless and dangerous. A big plus in Linux is the security, if you run as root you throw that security down the drain :)

I'd have to agree with you. This is one of the biggest criticisms of Linspire and its derivatives, the fact that by default, you're running as a root user. The way I see it, anything that you could possibly need to accomplish with a root account can be and/or should be done with sudo.

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MR_Candyman

personally, I prefer to do the above, then keep logging as as my user and when I need root access, I just su it, then I don't have to annoyingly type sudo everytime I need to write a line in. Just makes it a bit handier for me without killing my security

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farmeunit

I like to enable the root account when I first get it up and running so I can install everything I need without typing 'sudo' every time.

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  • 2 weeks later...
devilotX

you guys know you can just sudo su *password* and it will give you a constant root prompt right? that way you don't have to sudo over and over if you have a bunch of commands.

sudo su *password* gives you a root terminal, do your work, close out, no need for a root login.

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  • 10 months later...
Vinno

The command: sudo -i

also works, gets you into root and type exit when your done.

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  • 6 months later...
redvamp128

I ran into the similar issue where it would not let me edit the Menu.1st file Said I was not the owner- Tried opening with Sudo but to no avail-

I added a user then changed them to member of root- then logged off. Then signed in as the newly created user then I opened a command prompt- typed whoami and it said I was then root. Changed the Menu.1st file.

Because at the Sign in screen for some strange reason Ubuntu will not let Root have a desktop- but will allow a User in the root privilages can.

I hope this helps. BEFORE ANYONE SAYS IT I KNOW_ Resurecting an Old thread but I found another way to do this where still allowing you to maintain the User status but allowing you not to have to Type Sudo before everything.

The reason I had to do this... Is because even with the Sudo Su "Password" open editor- To change the Menu.1st it said I was not the owner and would not allow me to save.

But by creating the New User "Admin" then making him a member of Root. I was able to sign in with a full desktop and use the Text Editor to change and save the file.

Edited by redvamp128
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Budious
you guys know you can just sudo su *password* and it will give you a constant root prompt right? that way you don't have to sudo over and over if you have a bunch of commands.

sudo su *password* gives you a root terminal, do your work, close out, no need for a root login.

That's a good tip that I had not thought about. Using sudo to call up su, brilliant!

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