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goodcase    5

buslightslarge0rk.jpg

the quality got butchered because of my resize software. Its not my picture or the camera.

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metro    0
Amazing shot, great work! (Y)

Thank you :D

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Dejon    4
369482062_4d2165392a.jpg

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jbarcus81    5

I could use some pointers on night-shooting... I took this tonight.. just fooling around.. I've had this camera for a couple months now.. this picture was taken looking toward Fort Worth, TX... I figure if I mess around a bit.. I'll figure it out.. focusing though... not sure what if anything to focus on... manual focus and set to infinite??? I'm using a Pentax K110D... Settings used.. Exposure was 8 seconds.. can I turn that up?? ISO 200.. what are some good tips to follow when shooting at night with NO flash???

______

post-4844-1169785456_thumb.jpg

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metro    0
I could use some pointers on night-shooting... I took this tonight.. just fooling around.. I've had this camera for a couple months now.. this picture was taken looking toward Fort Worth, TX... I figure if I mess around a bit.. I'll figure it out.. focusing though... not sure what if anything to focus on... manual focus and set to infinite??? I'm using a Pentax K110D... Settings used.. Exposure was 8 seconds.. can I turn that up?? ISO 200.. what are some good tips to follow when shooting at night with NO flash???

At night there are a few things, you can turn the ISO up and use a faster shutter, or you can use a lower ISO and use a longer shutter. Both will generate noise in your photo at night but regardless of how you do it, I would make sure that you have the camera mounted on a tripod. To me, it is a must have for night shots and I always have a tripod wherever I have my camera with me.

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ECEGatorTuro    0
At night there are a few things, you can turn the ISO up and use a faster shutter, or you can use a lower ISO and use a longer shutter. Both will generate noise in your photo at night but regardless of how you do it, I would make sure that you have the camera mounted on a tripod. To me, it is a must have for night shots and I always have a tripod wherever I have my camera with me.

But you would also want to keep your ISO speed down sinec the higher you turn it up in the camera, the more noise you will tend to see in the image. Obviously turning down the ISO will lengthen exposure times but that's fine since you're taking long exposures anyway.

Just set your focus to manual, open your aperture up all the way or anywhere less than f/8 and make sure you use a tripod (obviously). Other than that, mirror lockup can help with the vibration but for the most part, it should be spray and pray from there. Just keep taking pictures and experiment!

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neufuse    4,416
A couple to kick the start of the new year :D

342157893_7363ca3e08.jpg

329967003_e4c0c35c80.jpg

what kind of camera is that? what exposure was used?

anyone use neutral density filters? what do you think of them?

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ECEGatorTuro    0
what kind of camera is that? what exposure was used?

anyone use neutral density filters? what do you think of them?

I know the second picture was an HDR composition and that's why it looks interesting.

As far as ND filters, they have a purpose just like any other filter. All they do is reduce every wavelength of light coming through it equally (hence the name, neutral) which directly translates into stopping down your exposure. The best example that I can think of is the following: Let's say you are trying to take a picture of a waterfall on a VERY bright day. In order to take great flowing water pictures, you need to have a slow shutter speed to capture the motion blur. Let's say you decide on setting your shutter speed at about 1/10 or 1/4 of a second. Even at the slowest ISO setting (most DSLRs only go down to 100 or even 50 possibly), the aperture setting may still be too open at the maximum setting (usually f/32). Because of this, you need to continue to reduce the amount of light coming into the lens by using a ND filter to keep a slow enough shutter speed to blur the water motion. Get it?

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kombolcha    11

took these a few weeks ago... just cropped to post it here.. casio z1000.

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MasterC    10

I just started getting into Photography thanks to a Digital Photography class I'm taking at school.

Windmills2.jpg

Highway2.jpg

I took these two on a recent trip to Palm Springs. The first is of a couple of windmills in a gigantic windmill farm (like hundreds of them!). The second is on the way home.

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Rob2687    72

^Those would make for some cool wallpapers.

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wired57    4

Images Removed

Please adhere to the size restrictions.

Edited by Chris Allen
Images removed.

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Xtremist    0

the 11hr exposure on the other page. How did they take that without it being over exposed i mean having the lense open for 11hrs must of over exposed it like make it really white. does it also damage ur camera doing exposures that long?

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metro    0
what kind of camera is that? what exposure was used?

anyone use neutral density filters? what do you think of them?

Canon Powershot A620 in manual mode with my settings adjusted manually for each shot. The only things that were constant were aperature, ISO, and Auto WB. I used f/2.8 and an ISO of 50. Exposure values are various, as both compositions are in HDR and have multiple exposures merged and tonemapped for the effect. The first one is just less subtle than the night photo. I know that on the night one, the longest shutter speed used was either 15 or 13 seconds to capture the final shot at +2EV.

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ECEGatorTuro    0
the 11hr exposure on the other page. How did they take that without it being over exposed i mean having the lense open for 11hrs must of over exposed it like make it really white. does it also damage ur camera doing exposures that long?

Not really... you have to understand how film (or digital sensors) work. The film/sensor only reacts to light. So if it is pitch black outside, nothing will expose and therefore there is nothing to over expose. In fact, you can try this out yourself by just leaving the lens cap on your camera in a dark place and take a one hour (or longer) exposure. Since a star is only a point source of light, that will only expose along the path that the star takes across the sky. The star is not bright enough to over expose the film/sensor. Now if it was a full moon out when that photo was taken, it *may* have made the foreground brighter but even then, there is just not enoough light to over expose.

Also, you will not damage your camera doing that. Film cameras are best for this because they require no power to lock up the mirror while the shutter stays open so you can leave it open all night long with no problem. DSLRs need power to keep the mirror locked up so you will have a limitation in terms of the length of exposure PLUS the time it takes for noise reduction (which takes just as long as the exposure).

Long term night exposures are fun to do and play with so definitely give it a shot if you're never done it. The full moon is great for shooting long term exposures of landscapes such as snow-covered mountains, etc. For an example, check out the first page and you'll see a 30" exposure of the San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff, AZ under a full moon. I would have exposed longer but I didn't have my remote trigger yet. :(

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Pink Floyd    15

nice pitrue of the road (Y)

and ugh I hate spiders hehe

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fuel925    0

Heres one I made earlier:

377414608_6d570767d1.jpg?v=0

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Dejon    4
377924001_c128b6a6eb_b_d.jpg

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Bubbabyte    14

I'm new to HDR but here is one i did a few days ago of the CN Tower in Toronto. I'm very impressed with it being that i had to zoom pretty far, it came out pretty smooth. I'm fully aware that looking at the thumbail you can see a halo from the HDR processing, normally i would have edited it so that there was no halo, but i can't see any signs of halo's when the picture is made larger. But like i said.. i'm new to HDR.. hope i'm off to a decent start :)

post-10919-1170482339_thumb.jpg

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Bubbabyte    14

here is another.. not HDR (although i do have another hdr if you would like) this one was stitched together from 3 photos and edited in photoshop.

post-10919-1170482794_thumb.jpg

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Xtremist    0
Heres one I made earlier:

377414608_6d570767d1.jpg?v=0

You didnt happen to read this months practical photography for that idea did you.... :p

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Xtremist    0
Not really... you have to understand how film (or digital sensors) work. The film/sensor only reacts to light. So if it is pitch black outside, nothing will expose and therefore there is nothing to over expose. In fact, you can try this out yourself by just leaving the lens cap on your camera in a dark place and take a one hour (or longer) exposure. Since a star is only a point source of light, that will only expose along the path that the star takes across the sky. The star is not bright enough to over expose the film/sensor. Now if it was a full moon out when that photo was taken, it *may* have made the foreground brighter but even then, there is just not enoough light to over expose.

Also, you will not damage your camera doing that. Film cameras are best for this because they require no power to lock up the mirror while the shutter stays open so you can leave it open all night long with no problem. DSLRs need power to keep the mirror locked up so you will have a limitation in terms of the length of exposure PLUS the time it takes for noise reduction (which takes just as long as the exposure).

Long term night exposures are fun to do and play with so definitely give it a shot if you're never done it. The full moon is great for shooting long term exposures of landscapes such as snow-covered mountains, etc. For an example, check out the first page and you'll see a 30" exposure of the San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff, AZ under a full moon. I would have exposed longer but I didn't have my remote trigger yet. :(

Sorry bout the doubble post, so how would you do an 11hr exposure with a Digital SLR then regarding the battery. Obviouslly you cant change the batt half way through the 11hrs. I know yith my nikon you can get a power lead to plug the camera into an electrical socket but if your outside there obviouslly wont be any plug sockets.

Any suggestions, my dad does have a pentax film slr from when he was a teenager its a good quality camera. but i would prefer to use digital

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ECEGatorTuro    0
Sorry bout the doubble post, so how would you do an 11hr exposure with a Digital SLR then regarding the battery. Obviouslly you cant change the batt half way through the 11hrs. I know yith my nikon you can get a power lead to plug the camera into an electrical socket but if your outside there obviouslly wont be any plug sockets.

Any suggestions, my dad does have a pentax film slr from when he was a teenager its a good quality camera. but i would prefer to use digital

Well, if you can find an adapter for a DSLR that can plug into an electrical socket, you are in business. All you need to do is buy an DC/AC power inverter at any place that sells auto hardware. They cost anywhere from $20-$100 depending on how many watts you want.

One note though... If you're going to be doing 11hr exposures, I would highly recommend film and not a DSLR. Remember, the DSLR needs to do post-processing for noise reduction and that will take an additional 11hr for an 11hr exposure. The NR will only fix so much noise and it will create obvious visual processing artifacts in the image. With film, you won't have to worry about any of the DSLR problems such as power, noise, etc. Just find yourself on eBay a cheap old SLR and you're set!

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fuel925    0
You didnt happen to read this months practical photography for that idea did you.... :p

Nope, nice try.. it was actually Digital Photo magazine.....

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dL    0

post-28244-1170631488_thumb.jpg

Location: Burnaby Mountain Park, Burnaby B.C.

Camera: Canon SD630

dL

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