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Do You UAC?

Do You UAC?  

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Brandon Live    232
^^^

Then i really don't see how it could be as annoying as people say...

I guess if software was badly designed then you couldn't install anything without admin rights but that is the developers fault, not Microsoft's.

Well, in all fairness, by default the prompts are shown in something called "Secure Desktop" - which does have a very real security purpose (one that other OSes like the Mac don't have a solution to), but it is incredibly jarring as the rest of the screen gets darkened around the dialog, and the dialog shows up in a Windows Basic theme. Of all the new things in Vista, that's the one that I feel really wasn't ready, it's just too unpleasant of an experience. I look forward to it being improved in the future, but for now I just turn it off.

Fortunately, you can turn it off without turning off UAC.

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Guest jgrodri   

ok, I get it now. Thanks!

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swgiant    0

i dun have any linux experience but iam really crazy of it. Sometimes, i will write a script for mIRC just for fun but found out the written script codes r not saved which has more than a few hundred lines. Even i edit and save the TXT file, it said "Cant be saved........." Finally, i got the answer, i have to run "Run As Administrator" Hell, so troublesome for me to each time i edit some txt or file or whatever configuration. End up, i totally disabled it. UAC really give me a nightmare.

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stockwiz    7

I turned mine off.

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freak_power    0
I turn off Secure Desktop, but leave UAC on. In fact, I'm a big fan of UAC - I find it to be a great way to gain control of the privilege level that my applications run with, while being a lot less annoying than using an actual LUA account and having to enter a password all the time.

In my opinion, Secure Desktop is what gives UAC a bad reputation. I won't use it until they make it a less jarring / slow / frustrating experience.

Wow. You have no idea how much that angers me. If only those co-workers would blame you and not us for any security problems they may run into because of your recklessness.

Actually UAC shoud pop only once asking you to provide administrator password, and then stop popping out unless you logoff or reboot machine.

That way is not annoying and your computer is well secured. Why? If you don't know admin password, you can't do whatever you were trying to do.

The way they implemented UAC now is just annoying, not making your computer more secured...because all you have to do is click Continue...pretty pointless..

Same idea, except in Vista if you are a member of the Administrators group, you don't need to enter a password. You simply have to click "Continue" or "Cancel" to allow the application to run with Admin privileges, which saves time.

Why would you be a member of Administrator group, unless you say so by login into computer as Admin and setting up user as admin as well.

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Mr. Gibs    3,865
Actually UAC shoud pop only once asking you to provide administrator password, and then stop popping out unless you logoff or reboot machine.

That way is not annoying and your computer is well secured. Why? If you don't know admin password, you can't do whatever you were trying to do.

The way they implemented UAC now is just annoying, not making your computer more secured...because all you have to do is click Continue...pretty pointless..

Why would you be a member of Administrator group, unless you say so by login into computer as Admin and setting up user as admin as well.

Lol pretty pointless to press continue yeh? Maybe thats cause idiots like you don't even bother reading what program is trying to load up or what activex your downloading...click continue for everything.

When malware tries to infect your windows folder and UAC pops up warning you, then maybe you will realize not to press continue....actually knowing how stupid you are [from the logic of your arguements] i bet you will prob press it anyways...

Btw the first account you make is an admin account...so i dont see why you will login as an admin and then make a new account.

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raskren    0
Actually UAC shoud pop only once asking you to provide administrator password, and then stop popping out unless you logoff or reboot machine.

That way is not annoying and your computer is well secured. Why? If you don't know admin password, you can't do whatever you were trying to do.

The way they implemented UAC now is just annoying, not making your computer more secured...because all you have to do is click Continue...pretty pointless..

Why would you be a member of Administrator group, unless you say so by login into computer as Admin and setting up user as admin as well.

Yeah, uh, only that is stupid. And insecure. And useless. And not worth implementing.

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Sockie    0

UAC is terrible.

I go and click on an item in control panel. I have clicked it. I know I want to do this so why is Windows locking my computer and asking permission? Yes. I double clicked it. So its clear I wanted to do what I'm doing. Why is UAC so retarded? Why can't it be smarter, why can't Windows track that there is cursor movement from the mouse device and therefore a person not a rogue program is doing an action that must therefore be correct.

Let's see how UAC improves in SP1 otherwise I'm happy to use Windows XP until 2014 or until Microsoft releases a Windows that I actually want to use.

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kalkal    476

I switched it off very soon after working with it for a while. I think it's a VERY good idea for most non technical users but a VERY bad idea for everyone else. But like I said, if it's not for you, just disable it. And if you don't know how, you're probably one of the non technical users :p

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freak_power    0
I switched it off very soon after working with it for a while. I think it's a VERY good idea for most non technical users but a VERY bad idea for everyone else. But like I said, if it's not for you, just disable it. And if you don't know how, you're probably one of the non technical users :p

And your default account should not be part of Admin group which means no **** can be installed, just like in Linux.

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Brandon Live    232
Actually UAC shoud pop only once asking you to provide administrator password, and then stop popping out unless you logoff or reboot machine.

That way is not annoying and your computer is well secured. Why? If you don't know admin password, you can't do whatever you were trying to do.

You obviously have no concept of how computers work, or why UAC exists. The entire point of it is that you can control what privilege level individual applications have. What you're describing doesn't even make any sense - if you're going to do that, why not just run as root all the time? Running every application elevated is basically your way of saying that you completely trust every piece of code on your system. I am not willing to take that risk. I don't trust any web browser to always be 100% secure. I don't trust 90% of the executables I download from the internet to be secure (or even to not be malware). So I don't want them running with permission to access my Windows directory, or the directories of other applications installed on the system.

No, UAC makes perfect sense and is implemented for the most part very well. In everyday use you should never see an elevation prompt. When you do need to install a new program, or change a system-wide setting, then clicking one extra button is a small price to pay for such a truly powerful security measure.

Why would you be a member of Administrator group, unless you say so by login into computer as Admin and setting up user as admin as well.
By default, Windows accounts created during setup are members of the Administrators group.
I switched it off very soon after working with it for a while. I think it's a VERY good idea for most non technical users but a VERY bad idea for everyone else. But like I said, if it's not for you, just disable it. And if you don't know how, you're probably one of the non technical users :p

That's where I disagree... truly technical users are the ones who are more likely to appreciate the advantages of UAC.

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freak_power    0

Trusting or not user will install anyway meaning he/she will click continue...which makes UAC just annoying....that's the point...

I said your account you login as Name Name should not be a part of admin group, just like in Linux. If you know admin password, we can safely assume that when you provide credentials that you're owner of the computer and UAC should not pop up anymore if checked the option to remember credentials for that session. If you don't know admin password, well you're not an owner of the computer or you're not supposed to be an admin by which way computer is protected from you.

The biggest problem is user, not web site you visit and gives you pop up to install something...

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SidVicious    157

UAC is one of the best things in Windows Vista.

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freak_power    0
UAC is one of the best things in Windows Vista.

One of the best things in Vista is actually Computer Management with all those options such as event viewer, performance measure tools, disk management, except for defragmentation tools which is missing progress bar and it slower then XP. Maybe it does the job better, but don't see it.

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thagame    0

Yes, iam really enjoy been annoyed

kind of a stupid poll option. i have it enabled and im not annoyed in the slightest.

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Brandon Live    232
Trusting or not user will install anyway meaning he/she will click continue...which makes UAC just annoying....that's the point...

I said your account you login as Name Name should not be a part of admin group, just like in Linux. If you know admin password, we can safely assume that when you provide credentials that you're owner of the computer and UAC should not pop up anymore if checked the option to remember credentials for that session. If you don't know admin password, well you're not an owner of the computer or you're not supposed to be an admin by which way computer is protected from you.

The biggest problem is user, not web site you visit and gives you pop up to install something...

But that misses the entire point! The point isn't that Windows doesn't think the user knows the admin password... that's why UAC exists - for ADMIN accounts. Without UAC, I have no way to tell IE, Firefox, Outlook, Trillian, or tons of other internet-exposed applications to run with limited privileges. When someone finds in exploit in any of those applications, they won't be able to do any damage because on MY machine, those applications are running with reduced privileges. They can't affect anything outside their own little sandbox.

How is that not insanely useful?

If you run every application elevated, then if any of those applications are compromised, your entire system is compromised. UAC is an extremely solid wall between individual applications and the system itself.

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dagamer34    2

The problem lies not in UAC itself, but the fact that programs aren't designed to work with Vista's security model. For example, I installed Logitech SetPoint for my wireless mouse + keyboard combo and every time I boot, I get an annoying UAC pop-up that I have to click continue for. Other things like simply deleting a file or changing some setting (before clicking apply) require a UAC pop-up. It just gets monotonous. I know Windows service packs don't have a history of critically changing too much functionality, but I'm hoping Vista SP1 makes Vista easier to use.

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Brandon Live    232
The problem lies not in UAC itself, but the fact that programs aren't designed to work with Vista's security model. For example, I installed Logitech SetPoint for my wireless mouse + keyboard combo and every time I boot, I get an annoying UAC pop-up that I have to click continue for. Other things like simply deleting a file or changing some setting (before clicking apply) require a UAC pop-up. It just gets monotonous. I know Windows service packs don't have a history of critically changing too much functionality, but I'm hoping Vista SP1 makes Vista easier to use.

Yeah, SetPoint is really annoying about that. So is the Logitech Harmony software - both of them request elevation for their updater on start-up which is ridiculous. Just turn it off... and complain to Logitech so they fix their broken software.

Deleting a file that you have permission to will never pop a UAC dialog. A normal user should never see a UAC dialog for a file operation. Even for an advanced user or system administrator it should be an extremely rare occurence. If you're seeing them frequently, you probably have your directory permissions set incorrectly. Anything accessible to your user account or the "users" group will not prompt for elevation.

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xpgeek    5

I turned it off, temporarily to instal a bunch of programs, then turned it back on. It doesn't bother me hardly at all. I prefer the extra layer of security of it, and it only even prompts me a couple times a day at most.

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The Dark Knight    263

I turned it off, too annoying.

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russellc    1
I'm not bothered by it. After having to do pretty much the exact same thing in linux for so long I've gotten used to it.

I find the one in Linux to be far, far less annoying and intrusive. From what I recall when using Vista, it didn't even ask me for a password when running a command/action pending authorization.

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1759    1

I use it, at the most, it's only a couple of extra clicks in RTM build. However, in Beta 2 it was a nightmare, but at least Microsoft listened to most of the complaints.

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S550    85

I run it, i like not installing **** i dont want.

It really sounds like Freak doesnt understand the point of security.

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Aasum    10
UAC is terrible.

I go and click on an item in control panel. I have clicked it. I know I want to do this so why is Windows locking my computer and asking permission? Yes. I double clicked it. So its clear I wanted to do what I'm doing. Why is UAC so retarded? Why can't it be smarter, why can't Windows track that there is cursor movement from the mouse device and therefore a person not a rogue program is doing an action that must therefore be correct.

Let's see how UAC improves in SP1 otherwise I'm happy to use Windows XP until 2014 or until Microsoft releases a Windows that I actually want to use.

Heard of a program called AutoIT. This program CAN move your mouse.....

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Emon    40

@Brandon Live

How can I turn off "Secure Desktop" without turning off "UAC"?

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