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Do You UAC?

Do You UAC?  

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Aero Ultimate    2
Windows can not find 'secpol.msc'. Make sure you typed the name correctly, and then try again.

I think it's not included in the Home editions, so you'll have to edit the registry directly.

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JOHW    3
People who think that are missing the point.

I "know what I'm doing" in Linux, yet I run my OS and apps as unpriveleged - only elevating what is needed. The purpose of UAC (or su/sudo in *nix) is to prevent malware (or malicious/ignorant users) from having unnecessary elevated priveleges.

People with UAC off will be automatically hit with malware in the future because they didn't use it. With UAC, you will at least be warned, putting in a safety catch.

Seriously I dun see the argument here. I know what I am doing, and choose to have all my privileges. You can choose to be restricted. It's all a matter of personal preference. Up till now, I haven't had any problems. If I had one, I could solve it by formatting and using a backup to restore my comp within a few hours. Compared to a constantly annoying screen asking me to allow mundane tasks, I'd rather take the risk which hasn't shown to have taken effect on me *yet

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slyph    3

i disabled it the second i finished the install

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_I am Reptar    35

It's annoying and I the first thing I did was disable it.

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midway40    0

I use UAC and starting tonight I am running as a standard user. My stint with Linux has me used to having to put in the "root" password for important things. Only thing I dislike is having to provide a password just to move icons on the desktop. Thankfully I don't do that often because I like to keep my desktop neat.

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Dane    176

Can you teach UAC to play nice with other things that you do? Can you click something so it "remembers this choice for actions like this"? or something like that. My Vista shipped and should be here monday since apparently UPS dont deliver on saturday.

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Evolution    16
Can you teach UAC to play nice with other things that you do? Can you click something so it "remembers this choice for actions like this"? or something like that. My Vista shipped and should be here monday since apparently UPS dont deliver on saturday.

That would sort of defeat the purpose... if it didn't need high level privleges to perform the action, then the program was coded poorly. And if it does... you're allowing any type of malware or hacker to automatically have access to those actions. And performing a single action should only popup one consent...

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woodson    0

hate it i bought the os so i want to use it anyway i want.like what do you think you would do to your tv if it asked you ....you need permission to change chanel to 5 ..do you really want to change channel to 5 .thats right brick into screen.

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Brandon Live    232
hate it i bought the os so i want to use it anyway i want.like what do you think you would do to your tv if it asked you ....you need permission to change chanel to 5 ..do you really want to change channel to 5 .thats right brick into screen.

worst. analogy. ever.

Seriously I dun see the argument here. I know what I am doing, and choose to have all my privileges. You can choose to be restricted.

It's not about what privileges you have. It's about what priviliges you give to the applications you run. Most importantly, it's restricting the access that applications have to your system to only what they need. So if somebody hijacks your IM client with a remote code exploit, it won't be able to do serious harm to your system. It isolates the impact a compromised application can have on the rest of the system, similar to a "sandbox" sort of technique. In fact, for compatibility, that's exactly what UAC does (virtualizing registry and filesystem access).

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null_    4

I usually leave User Account Control enabled - it may seem annoying at times, but it is a decent security feature and I would rather click a few more buttons here and there instead of having something trash Windows.

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rtk    0

It'll be a lot easier to defend UAC once the exploits start to happen, and every security reports that it's only on systems with UAC off.

"Power users" are the most dangerous threat to network security. I'm hoping by SP1 or 2 that UAC will be mandatory.

@ Brandon: What's the solution for programs like Everest (with the sidebar gadget), Hyena, etc that require elevation? At home UAC is on, since Everest runs in the tray, but at Work, I've turned it off for now since many of my admin tools require elevation. Sorry to not have RTFM.

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Julius Caro    55

I have UAC enabled. I really enjoy clicking on "deny" every time adobe wants to update :p I guess I'll let it check for updates some day.

But it's really annoying when you want to modify files in certain locations

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tomwarren    68

It's very irritating for power users but for my sister and my mum and dad I keep it on as it stops them being silly :)

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stockwiz    7

how do you turn off secure desktop using the registry?

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+virtorio    3,100

I think UAC is a good concept, unfortunately implemented in a somewhat clunky, and often unhelpful (like when you click More Info and the extra info an just a GUID, what help is this to anyone?) way. Hopefully it will help some people out. I'm a Mac user so I don't find it to be too much of an inconvenience.

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franzon    7
how do you turn off secure desktop using the registry?

turn on your brain... don't disable it! :whistle:

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Wh1t3w0lf    0

I can't understand people that turn UAC off. For the first time in a Windows OS we have a security feature that closely resembles the philosophy of the more secure UNIX systems. It took too many years for MS to realize that the biggest security hole in Windows was every user being an Administrator with full privileges active. By using UAC you send a clear message to all the software vendors to develop secure applications. If software developers for Windows follow the simple guidelines that MS is trying to enforce with UAC, we would see in the following years an immediate decrease of malicious attacks with trojans, remote exploits and malware in the Windows platform.

All those who think they are power users and they don't need UAC, please just reconsider and think for a moment how dumb you make UNIX users look like. Do you really think we are paranoid or not careful enough by using superuser privilleges only when they are really needed? NO one, not even the most expert user with years of experience can be safe from a security hole in one of his system's applications. Why would you want that application to run in superuser mode? Think of UAC like the car's seatbelt. It's a minor annoyance especially if you think you drive really safely, but when the worst happens it might save your life.

UAC is more than a tool to secure Vista. It?s the process of educating the average Windows user and make him use his OS the correct way. It's is in our best interest for UAC to be a success if we want one day to have a secure and healthy Windows platform and ecosystem respectively.

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Novaoblivion    0

I have it turned off because it asks about everything, I have UNIX based systems as well and then dont ask nearly as much.

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theyarecomingforyou    10,421

Although I have been using PCs since the days of DOS, and consider myself fairly knowledgeable in the area of computers, I still have UAC enabled. There is no denying that it could be improved to be less intrusive and appear less often but it is still a valuable security tool and something to complement the anti-virus software I already use. I'd rather be informed about what's going on with my computer than have software happily mangle away my Vista install.

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FrozenBacon    0

I turned it off because when I installed vista it was late at night and I didn't want to deal with any UAC nonsense. I'll turn it back on at a later date, though , as I do like the idea.

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mrp04    375

I might have left it on if it didn't ask every time I want to change anything in the start menu! It is just too annoying, and not done correctly.

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Echilon    1

No, UAC was more of an inconveniance so I disabled it.

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xxdesmus    0

In my opinion, a very simple way to make UAC suck less would be to add some type of "Safe Applications" list...There is no reason why I need to authorize the EXACT same application EVERY single time I want to open it. That is ridiculous.

A good example is CCleaner, EVERY single f***ing time I want to open it UAC will make sure I really mean to...that is unacceptable. :no:

I've tried it, I've tried to "get used to it", but it is just a terrible implementation of a great idea. Fix it and I'll use it, but right now it is broken.

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AdverseDeviant    3

turned it back on but with that auto confirm registry thing

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Evolution    16
In my opinion, a very simple way to make UAC suck less would be to add some type of "Safe Applications" list...There is no reason why I need to authorize the EXACT same application EVERY single time I want to open it. That is ridiculous.

A good example is CCleaner, EVERY single f***ing time I want to open it UAC will make sure I really mean to...that is unacceptable. :no:

I've tried it, I've tried to "get used to it", but it is just a terrible implementation of a great idea. Fix it and I'll use it, but right now it is broken.

when I open CCleaner, it never prompts me...

BTW having a "Safe Applications" list would also mean this becomes an "Applications freely available to Hacker/Virus/Exploit" list.... that's the reason. It's not a firewall...

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